Disqualified for things I don't have?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by wp_classof2023, Feb 13, 2019.

  1. wp_classof2023

    wp_classof2023 Member

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    I was medically DQ'ed by DoDMERB early on the application process. It was really frustrating because everything that they claimed I had, I didn't. When I was in my physical exam I even stated that I did not have these medical issues. Thankfully I was able to get a waiver to USAFA and I'm fairly competitive. I'm currently waiting to be granted a waiver by USMA and USNA. Is anyone else in the same boat?
     
  2. usafa2023hopeful

    usafa2023hopeful Member

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    I'm in a similar situation. My medical disqualifications are issues that I have had, but my current medical status should not disqualify me based on DODMERB's descriptions. How long did your waiver process take? Also, did USAFA notify you they were in the waiver review process?
     
  3. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    If you have the waiver for the USAFA and you want to go there, why don't you accept and just let the other waivers go. I am assuming here that you want to fly, since you applied to USNA and USAFA. USMA only has rotary wing aviation? Or did you just hedge your bets and apply across the board?
     
  4. wp_classof2023

    wp_classof2023 Member

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    I applied to all three just in case. I haven't received my appointment to USAFA so it's still up in the air
     
  5. candide72

    candide72 Member

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    I got DQd for vision and then my ow doctor said I have incredibly good vision. I’ll never understand how two doctors can come to such different conclusions...
     
  6. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    That's why the phrase is "seeking out a second opinion". :) Not a "second fact".

    Thanks to all that posted their experiences so far in this thread. Great examples of how the DODMERB probably merits more care and consideration for its application than for the original SA or ROTC applications.

    The good news is that, generally speaking, once you make it through that wicket, you are through. DODMERB doesn't apply any more once you are out of officer training (assuming you didn't get away with lying about a condition, of course).
     
  7. candide72

    candide72 Member

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    I didn’t seek a second opinion, I just needed new glasses and he remarked how good my vision was and how I’m correctable to 20/15. I don’t know how two doctors can come to such different conclusions about what prescription I need within a week?
     
  8. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    Does anyone know....is it DoDMERB who performs the Medical Board for members separating or retiring who are claiming disabilities? I know that different Commands do the initial medical, but does DoDMERB review the findings and issue a disability determination, or is it down by the individual commands?
     
  9. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    Alright, there was a little bit of a joke in there, but I'll let it go and explain. The phrase with doctors is to "seek a second opinion". In other words, you are requesting a subjetive assessment.

    You got one doctor's opinion that your vision sucked. The next one said it was great. Clearly one of them is wrong, as this would otherwise violate the Law of Noncontradiction. Perhaps one was an ophthalmologist and the other was an optometrist. Perhaps one sucks at their job, and the other one doesn't. Perhaps one looked at you harder than the other. Perhaps one made a mistake-- it happens.

    All that matters is which physician DODMERB believes.
     
  10. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    When leaving active duty, you do a discharge physical at your nearest MTF, usually. That’s the time to ensure any service or combat-related illnesses, injuries or conditions are documented.

    The VA does the examinations for the purpose of rating disability. The separating or retiring member submits a claim that includes copies of relevant military health records. It’s all about proving you got it while serving.
     
  11. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    Thank you Ma'am..:) I knew VA did the VA rating exams but was not sure where the "military" rating comes from. So when a military med or personnel board is done, VA reviews the record and assigned a "military disability rating", then and the veteran is "separated" they can only contest the VA part of their disability? I only ask because I have met Veterans who carry a 20% service disability and are 70% or higher for VA disability, but since they do not have a 30% "service" disability they cannot get CRDP. Is there a way or a place to send these Vets to help them increase their service disability? I don't think VA can go back and increase a service med board rating, or can they?
     
  12. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    I am a life member of the DAV, Disabled American Veterans, a non-profit. They have mobile vet service vans, the schedule for which you can find on their website. They have certified VA disability counselors who can advise. Any vet can use their services.

    In addition, most states will have a city or county Veteran Service Officer (VSO) Office, with counselors certified on both Fed VA and state veteran benefits.

    The VA also has a number of community centers now to aid in vet outreach and referrals to the right folks to get answers.

    Other service organizations such as AMVETS, American Legion, VFW, etc., also offer trained VSO services.

    I got my retirement disability raised because of something that occurred near the end of my AD duty time, and then started recurring regularly. I submitted a new claim to the VA.
     
  13. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    I am sorry Ma'am for the tardy response, things at home have pretty hectic. I am also a Life Member of the DAV, as well as being an Accredited Service officer by the VA. I volunteer at a VET Center and can do everything a County or State Service Officer can... I do outreach with the VET Center, and know most of the NSO's who man the Mobile Service Offices, so Thank You Ma'am for your service and I hope the DAV has helped and supported you.
     
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