Do admissions look at applicants who were not born in the United States differently?

ABCDE_2026

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For example, I was born in China then adopted by parents who are American citizens. I love the United States more than anything and have no loyalties to China whatsoever. Due to what's going on with China and stuff, would the fact that I was born there affect my application?
 
For example, I was born in China then adopted by parents who are American citizens. I love the United States more than anything and have no loyalties to China whatsoever. Due to what's going on with China and stuff, would the fact that I was born there affect my application?
No. Take joy in being a classic representative of the melting pot.
 
One of my best friends at the academy was born in Russia and adopted by American citizens. Your Chinese birth will not affect your application.
 
My son won an appointment to CGAS this year. He was born in the UK and we moved to the US 9 years ago. He thought this and him having travelled extensively and experienced different cultures actually strengthened his application.
 
Frankly, I doubt the Admissions Board knows, and certainly doesn't care, if you were adopted or born in another country, unless you emphasize the issue in your personal statement. An Admissions Counselor "briefs" the Admissions Board on the highlights of your package - and I doubt that place of birth or adoption is even considered significant.
 
The answer to your question is a simple 'no'. Did your parents take the extra step of obtaining an N-600 Certificate of Citizenship? I know that not having one is sometimes an issue as males turn 18 and need to register for Selective Service. Not having a COC can also come into play when applying for Federal Financial Aid. I know it is an expensive proposition, but it's best to have a COC, just in case you are asked for one.
 
Form N-600 volume 12, Part H

Under Chapter 2, part C, it reads;
  • The child is adopted in the United States or abroad;
  • The child is adopted before he or she reaches 16 years of age (except for certain cases where the child may be adopted before reaching 18 years of age); and
  • The child is in the legal custody of the adopting parent or parents at the time of the adoption.
In general, the adoption must:
  • Be valid under the law of the country or place granting the adoption;
  • Create a legal permanent parent-child relationship between a child and someone who is not already the child’s legal parent; and
  • Terminate the legal parent-child relationship with the prior legal parent(s).
 
The answer to your question is a simple 'no'. Did your parents take the extra step of obtaining an N-600 Certificate of Citizenship? I know that not having one is sometimes an issue as males turn 18 and need to register for Selective Service. Not having a COC can also come into play when applying for Federal Financial Aid. I know it is an expensive proposition, but it's best to have a COC, just in case you are asked for one.
One shouldn't be needed even USCIS state one isn't required. A US passport also proves citizenship.
 
@sanman Agree 100%. You'd think a US passport alone would prove citizenship. I only mention it due to recent real world incidences that I know of first-hand among families who adopted from China and Korea. It keeps popping up and causing trouble for people I know in the adoption community. In the early 2000s it was suggested that parents obtain a COC for their newly adopted child in addition to a US passport. At $1,000 a pop, after spending on average $30,000 to adopt, most were like, we'll take care of it later. It's now later and they never took care of it and it can cause issues, especially for boys.

I'm simply pointing this out for the OP. Perhaps s/he already has a COC in hand, in which case they are covered for all possible situations.
 
No. Take joy in being a classic representative of the melting pot.
A teacher of mine years ago had a different analogy, that the United States is a tossed salad instead of a melting pot. The melting pot reference suggests that we are becoming a homogeneous culture, with all culture melting into one. Whereas, in a tossed salad each ingredient has it's own unique flavor that can be identified individually and, when combined with other the other ingredients results, combines to make something better than the sum of the parts. Lettuce, tomatoes, onions, cheese, dressing, BACON, etc are each good by themselves, but combine together for a tasty tossed salad.
 
Not required and expensive but will expedite the process of proving citizenship. Passports expire and there is some anecdotal discussion that the passport office may require a COC to renew a passport.
 
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