DODMERB question

SCubb

Member
DS fractured his ankle 4 years ago. Since then he has played multiple years of varsity soccer and track - no issues.
Given potential sensitivity to concerns about running - should he go to a doctor for a proactive follow up in advance of meeting with DODMERB doctor? So he has a DR note saying his ankle is a non issue? Or should we wait to see if it becomes an issue first?
 

brewmeist

Member
My feeling is that going to the doctor about it now will suddenly make this non-issue an issue. Many SA appointees have had previous injuries, especially if they play a varsity sport. Trust the system.
 

shock-n-awe

Member
DS fractured his ankle 4 years ago. Since then he has played multiple years of varsity soccer and track - no issues.
Given potential sensitivity to concerns about running - should he go to a doctor for a proactive follow up in advance of meeting with DODMERB doctor? So he has a DR note saying his ankle is a non issue? Or should we wait to see if it becomes an issue first?
My DS had broken his collarbone and had a plate and screws installed while in middle school. When he began his quest to attend an SA, I found SAF. While reading the many threads about DODMERB issues, DQ’s, and remedials, it sounded daunting to get through unless your worst medical issue had been a common cold! We also attended many of the annual All Academy day briefs and Larry Mullen from DODMERB spoke at one. Long story short, I don’t recall him directly advising us to revisit DS old injury, but I ultimately determined it was in our best interest. So we scheduled a visit to the office where he had the surgery, and actually met with the surgeon who worked on DS for an evaluation. He cleared him 100% with no restrictions and presented us with a letter stating that. I did have to pay for that visit out of pocket, but worth it IMO. We brought that letter to the DODMERB exam and had no issue with it. Could DS have gotten through DODMERB without our letter? Maybe maybe not, but we were prepared to show he was healthy and unrestricted.
So my advice is to be proactive and get “pre” qualified for any known medical issues prior to the DODMERB exam if possible.
It will hopefully save you valuable time and prevent headaches and heart attacks later.
 
My DS had broken his collarbone and had a plate and screws installed while in middle school.
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Plate and screws in the collarbone is not all that uncommon. I would be more worried about damage to the SC joint and/or rotator instead.
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If he takes a wicked tumble or hit to that area, he could bend the plate and back the screws out a bit. I have seen pictures of that. But, it is easily fixable.
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Heatherg21

Member
Our DS has his DOD medical on Monday, Eye Dr. on Wednesday. We are taking medical records with us from his middle school injury with surgeries, hardware and hardware removal. Thankfully the last appointment the doctor noted 100% full recovery, no issues, healthy young man. Fingers crossed!
 
keep in mind - civilian doctors don't "clear" a candidate. the only thing they can do is provide add to the info that is in the records, to define and describe history and current condition and then DODMERB makes a decision. there are many many cases of candidates getting a DQ after sending in a letter from a doctor saying 'cleared for military service'

history of broken bones is not an issue if they are properly healed. retained hardware (pins, screws, etc) are also not a DQ if bones are healed and not symptomatic. however, a broken bone that did not heal correctly can be a DQ

the source doc is at https://www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmotc/nami/arwg/Documents/WaiverGuide/DODI_6130.03_JUL12.pdf
 

shock-n-awe

Member
Indeed, the only people that ”clear” anyone medically for military service is that service or their designated contractor. While broken bones and mending plates are not uncommon, they will still gain DODMERB attention even if minor.

I am only providing my experience as an example (of endless conditions) of medical history that could possibly cause a challenge at DODMERB. The ultimate message I am trying to send is for people to be proactive in the process and by getting “cleared” by their medical provider of whatever prior condition (s) they may have had. It won’t hurt, and may likely help the process.
This falls under “Control what you can control “ and know you did all that you could and the rest is up to the DODMERB judges.
 
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