Does being in a fraternity effect being able to join an rotc

fighter12

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Hello, I am a freshman at Texas A&M University, and I have recently had the desire to join the military, most likely the army or the air force. I was told by a recruiter that it would be a good idea to enroll in my schools rotc program, which I believe would be the corps of cadets. I like the idea of it, however I have already taken on the obligation of my fraternity (I joined a fraternity the first semester of my freshman year). Is it possible to be in this fraternity and also be a part of the corps, or do I need to find some other avenue?
 

MidCakePa

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Don’t know Texas A&M and what’s required to participate in its Corps of Cadets. But I do know you need to answer this question: What’s more important to you, becoming a commissioned officer or participating in a fraternity? That will determine your priorities and appropriate actions, should you need to make a hard choice or apportion your time/energy/resources.

What’s not clear from your post is whether you want to earn an officer’s commission or enlist. Big difference. Make sure you know that difference and what either choice entails.
 
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NJROTC-CC

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Both could be big time commitments. I don’t know about Corps of Cadets at a senior military college. But I know people who have done both at civilian colleges. The TAMU web page says:

“Army ROTC Cadets have the same lifestyles and academic schedules as any other college students. They join fraternities and sororities. They participate in varsity team and individual sports. They take part in community service projects and lead student organizations like MSC SCONA. But there are two intensive Army ROTC courses”

I was not in ROTC, but I am a Sigma Chi. After I pledged and then initiated, there was not a big mandatory time demand at all. I was an officer in the fraternity, but there were other brothers who I never saw around at all. Since you’ve already joined the fraternity, if you start ROTC next year, I would think you can do it. But you may not have as much time to devote to the fraternity.


Best advice: go talk to the cadre
 
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dadinnc

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Hello, I am a freshman at Texas A&M University, and I have recently had the desire to join the military, most likely the army or the air force. I was told by a recruiter that it would be a good idea to enroll in my schools rotc program, which I believe would be the corps of cadets. I like the idea of it, however I have already taken on the obligation of my fraternity (I joined a fraternity the first semester of my freshman year). Is it possible to be in this fraternity and also be a part of the corps, or do I need to find some other avenue?
I applaud your desire to serve. I don’t know much about Texas A&M other than the fact that it is one of six senior military schools. My son is a first year cadet at another of the six. Being a first year cadet, along with academics, is all consuming (especially first semester). The advice to carefully weigh and consider your priorities is spot on. There is not a wrong answer. Just give whatever path you choose your best effort. Good luck!
 

Cadet35

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Yes it’s possible, I recommend against it, however since you’re already in the frat just get your priorities straight and watch who you surround yourself with consistently. Nothing but trouble comes from greek life besides maybe a few solid connections IMO.
 

nature boy

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IDK about Texas A&M either. I am an Engineering major, I am an officer in the fraternity, starter on the wrestling team, made Dean's list both semesters last year and just this past semester too. If you are good at time management, there's no reason it can't be done for 4 years in college. For me, whenever there's a conflict, AROTC takes precedence, since they're paying the freight for me to attend school; I was upfront with everyone about this- sport coaches, fraternity, etc and no one has had a problem with it to date.
 

PRBWJB

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My husband did both in the 80’s.
I do believe sororities are a bigger time commitment now (as compared to when I was in college), but don’t know about fraternities. I would suggest you stay away from any leadership/officer positions in your fraternity.
I speak as a recent advisor for a national sorority at a small state university in the South.
 

USMA2026Cadet

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I’m currently in ROTC and there are many cadets in fraternities at my college. It can be done, and if you’re good with time management, you’ll be good. The point of ROTC is to provide a pathway towards commissioning as an officer while providing a normal college experience, which greek life is fully a part of at most institutions. Best of luck!
 

jaglvr

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At A&M, if you enroll in the ROTC program (have to by sophomore year or you're out of luck anyway), you HAVE to be in the Corps. You can be in the Corps and NOT ROTC but not the other way around. The Corp would teach you the military discipline on its own and lead you to possible avenues of commissioning on its own, but it would be harder without the added ROTC piece of it. FYI, ALL band members of the A&M marching and ARE members of the Corps. But they aren't all (probably very few) participants of ROTC.
 

USA1962

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Yes it’s possible, I recommend against it, however since you’re already in the frat just get your priorities straight and watch who you surround yourself with consistently. Nothing but trouble comes from greek life besides maybe a few solid connections IMO.
Fraternities and sororities attract the best and most driven and successful men and women at most schools. Not sure your experience, however with 2 students In Greek life, I see it only as a positive.
 

gooseblitz

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I had 2 fraternity brothers in college that were ROTC. I also had a teammate on football team who was in ROTC. Football took more time that fraternity. But no issue for them.
 

Cadet35

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Fraternities and sororities attract the best and most driven and successful men and women at most schools. Not sure your experience, however with 2 students In Greek life, I see it only as a positive.

It is the exact opposite in my experience. Hard drugs and alcohol 25/8. My college has very little professional fraternities and sororities so that may very well factor into my viewpoint.
 

unkown1961

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It is the exact opposite in my experience. Hard drugs and alcohol 25/8. My college has very little professional fraternities and sororities so that may very well factor into my viewpoint.
That has been my sons' experiences on their campuses. At Southern Cal one frat's members were very driven - they drugged and sexually assaulted women at their parties.
My daughter had a great experience at her sorority, but it was at MIT so devoid of the usual Rush BS like having to buy special outfits and nice stationary to write thank you letters. And they while they had a good time, the weekends didn't start in Thursday nights.
But my sons considered a lot of, not all mind you, frat members as focused on partying (and "d bags" per one of them). I'm 60 and that's been the rep of frats from when I went to college.
In sum, I don't think being a frat member or not is any indication of being among the most driven and successful students at a school (I teach at a state university and I've seen both sides from my students).
If one wants to join a frat, do it for the right reasons and just make sure they'll be accommodating to ROTC requirements, especially during the initiation period. ROTC needs to come first. Also check out who the members are and if they share one's values.
 

MidCakePa

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There are social fraternities and professional fraternities. Big difference. Many will say that social fraternities do many “good works” in the community, which I believe. I also know several men who say their fraternity (and fraternity brothers) is what set them on the path to success.

I also read every year tragic stories of ridiculous hazing practices, alcohol-fueled misbehavior and deaths, shameful misogyny and sexual assault, etc.

Like so many other things in life, there is much that is good there. But also enough bad that I would never say Greek life is “nothing but positive.” As others noted above, choose carefully. And be true to your own values and ethics. No one needs any certain tribe so badly that they must compromise their core beliefs.
 

gooseblitz

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I am a fraternity member. My personal experience has been very positive. I'm 52 and when I just went across the country to visit schools with my DS I had several current undergrads from multiple colleges from my fraternity meet me to show us around their campuses. The social advantages are nice. It has helped my career. That being said while visiting schools and local chapters of my fraternity I could tell I would be cautious about my son joining a few of them. He is a more serious student than I was. definitely a decision you'd need to make specific to your circumstance.
 
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