eczema waiver

Pima

10-Year Member
Use the search tab here, there is a tone of eczema threads. DoDMERB DQs, the commissioning source waives. You have not said which branch, nor which source. USMA may say no, but NROTC may say yes.

Short answer is make sure it is eczema. Long answer is eczema is not only the medication prescribed, but the risk of side effects for shots due to deployments.
~ Eczema goes in remission and nobody can predict when you will have an outbreak. Stress and food allergies can create problems. No offense, but this is not about you. It is about the mission being completed and those that have to step in your place if you cannot be deployed.
~~ Can they deploy you to a base/post in the sandbox where they can't get a refill for your prescription of dupixent right away? If the answer is no, than that means somebody else must be deployed in your stead so they can complete the mission.
 
Thank you for the answer, Pima. yes, read most of the eczema posts and sounds like "mild" is the keyword for waiver. Dupixent is new drug and not sure what's military's opinion on it.
Totally understand your point of complication of deployment.

Applied USAFA, USNA, NROTIC and AFROTC. Currently awarded NROTC 4y scholarship, USAFA medical status "Disqualified" due to D111.10 (eczema), not knowing if waiver will be filed or not. USNA and AFROTC is still in progress, but most likely will have the same result due to D111.10.
 

GoCubbies

Member
any thoughts on waiver possibility of eczema being treated by dupixent?
If you don't mind me asking, any reason why your doctor is using a drug that is FDA approved for moderate to severe eczema? In general, if you have mild eczema, then using Dupixent is overkill.

It's also quite expensive since it's relatively new. The military healthcare program (Tricare) will make you jump through hoops to get it - and that's even if they'll consider dispensing it. The med is given as an injection too which is generally a big no-no for deployment purposes.

I digress a bit, because it's really the condition (ie eczema) that will be the issue for you rather than the med. However, someone reviewing your records may put 2+2 together and think you've got moderate to severe eczema since that's what Duxpixent is used for.
 
It was mild most of the time and bad at one time (past spring), hence parent decided to go with Dupixent and started in last summer. Would be convincing to stop it now and see how it will go? and prove it is "mild"?
 

A1Janitor

Banned
It was mild most of the time and bad at one time (past spring), hence parent decided to go with Dupixent and started in last summer. Would be convincing to stop it now and see how it will go? and prove it is "mild"?
I would do that immediately ... find a drug that they allow and get that one.
 

FMHS-79

Parent
It was mild most of the time and bad at one time (past spring), hence parent decided to go with Dupixent and started in last summer. Would be convincing to stop it now and see how it will go? and prove it is "mild"?
I would do that immediately ... find a drug that they allow and get that one.
As @GoCubbies, indicated above, it is really the condition and not medicine which is the issue. At this stage of the game, I would be hesitant to start experimenting with other medications in the hope that it might help convince the waiver authorities that the condition is mild enough to be waiverable. Has NROTC or DoDMERB contacted you regarding additional information needed for the waiver assessment?
 

A1Janitor

Banned
It was mild most of the time and bad at one time (past spring), hence parent decided to go with Dupixent and started in last summer. Would be convincing to stop it now and see how it will go? and prove it is "mild"?
I would do that immediately ... find a drug that they allow and get that one.
As @GoCubbies, indicated above, it is really the condition and not medicine which is the issue. At this stage of the game, I would be hesitant to start experimenting with other medications in the hope that it might help convince the waiver authorities that the condition is mild enough to be waiverable. Has NROTC or DoDMERB contacted you regarding additional information needed for the waiver assessment?
I understand that perspective. And agree with it.

I’m coming from the father perspective knowing the kid’s eczema is mild. I know people with mild. My older brother is bad. He wouldn’t be qualified.

If lesser drugs don’t solve it ... it’s a dq. If they do, it shouldn’t be.
 
Thank you all for replying. No, not being contacted by SA/DoDMERG for AMI yet. Worrying this would be the shop stopper...as a sad father now, I should've consulted expert before suggesting dupixent while ago and continue with the cream solution
 

GoCubbies

Member
Thank you all for replying. No, not being contacted by SA/DoDMERG for AMI yet. Worrying this would be the shop stopper...as a sad father now, I should've consulted expert before suggesting dupixent while ago and continue with the cream solution
Sir... you never know. If you haven't word from DODMERB about how USNA and AFROTC dispositioned the exam, then you're still good. However, having been on this forum for just over a year now, I've seen eczema to be the one of a handful of conditions the services are really concerned about. You are correct, if USAFA DQ'ed, then USNA and AFROTC will most likely DQ also. Eczema is 4-letter word somehow. When the medical reviewer sees the word "eczema" , then the ding-ding-ding starts to sound. Assuming Dupixent was written on the DODMERB exam form, then the double ding-ding-ding goes off.

I think the best that can happen is the medical records reflect mild eczema, the distribution around the body is minimal, and lesions resolve with OTC hydrocortisone cream.

Hopefully, this will go in your favor. Please keep the forum updated because you won't be the last applicant to have this issue and others can use as a data point.
 

Tyfen

New Member
Thank you all for replying. No, not being contacted by SA/DoDMERG for AMI yet. Worrying this would be the shop stopper...as a sad father now, I should've consulted expert before suggesting dupixent while ago and continue with the cream solution
Sir... you never know. If you haven't word from DODMERB about how USNA and AFROTC dispositioned the exam, then you're still good. However, having been on this forum for just over a year now, I've seen eczema to be the one of a handful of conditions the services are really concerned about. You are correct, if USAFA DQ'ed, then USNA and AFROTC will most likely DQ also. Eczema is 4-letter word somehow. When the medical reviewer sees the word "eczema" , then the ding-ding-ding starts to sound. Assuming Dupixent was written on the DODMERB exam form, then the double ding-ding-ding goes off.

I think the best that can happen is the medical records reflect mild eczema, the distribution around the body is minimal, and lesions resolve with OTC hydrocortisone cream.

Hopefully, this will go in your favor. Please keep the forum updated because you won't be the last applicant to have this issue and others can use as a data point.
I am going through the same problem, I had eczema and want to commission through Air Force OTS. I am 20 now, but had eczema when I was 13-14 years old. I was prescribed a steroid topical cream for it at the time, but it has been years since then and I consider my eczema to be mild/not a problem as I control it with a simple moisturizer.

I have seen people get waivers for eczema, despite how hard it is. The caveat, however, is this: "Select candidates medically classified as having mild forms of eczema will be processed for a waiver. Certain occupational restrictions may be applied to secure personal and mission safety."

Upon further research: "Some blocked occupations may include aircraft maintainers, civil engineering and some jobs under Air Force Special Operations Command."

Assuming an eczema waiver is even granted, is becoming a pilot in the AF (my goal) even possible, under these restrictions?
 

Skipper07

Member
I had eczema waived by USNA and was cleared for unrestricted line service in the Navy. However, the commissioning medical will be another hoop to jump through.

I’m not saying anyone can get a waiver, I am simply saying it is possible.
 
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