Emailing Admissions Counselor About Marijuana Use

Nbloom24

New Member
Hey, on my DODMER physical I answered that I have smoked weed on three occasions, but was not explicit in saying how much I regret these actions and will never do this again. Is it worth sending an email to my admissions counselor to this effect?
USNA is my top choice for schools and do not want to be rejected because I was not clear.
 

AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
So you would say that I should email the admissions counselor?
This is my opinion, but yes. (my DS was truthful about his one-time use in HS....he is now a 2LT).
  • On the plus side it clarifies your position.
  • On the down side, it calls attention to it.
  • On the plus side, you can at least look in the mirror and know you did the right thing.
 

Nbloom24

New Member
This is my opinion, but yes. (my DS was truthful about his one-time use in HS....he is now a 2LT).
  • On the plus side it clarifies your position.
  • On the down side, it calls attention to it.
  • On the plus side, you can at least look in the mirror and know you did the right thing.
Thank you!
 

Nbloom24

New Member
JMPO, but call your admissions counselor. This is probably a case where on a real-time one-on-one conversation will carry more weight than email. It will provide counselor the opportunity to get to know you better and to hear the sincerity in your voice.
Thank you!
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
  • On the plus side it clarifies your position.
  • On the down side, it calls attention to it.
Tough call, AROTC identies the + and -. You're not the first candidate that has smoke MJ, or done other stupid things. The question in my mind is always what you learned and commttment that it won't happen again. MJ/Drug use has always been a major issue in the Navy (well , at least since the early 80's), and as Norfolk63 points out, it will get additional scrutiny because of drug bust in the Brigade last year, I don't think that drawing attention to it is going to be a factor --it will be noted; so I would try to address it up front , first with a call to Admission Counselor, then a follow up email. It may or may not clear you .....but at least you tried.

For other Candidates., especially the younger ones who haven't made the mistake yet --- MJ/Drug use is still illegal under federal law, and according to the Navy, regardless of what your State laws are. IT IS A BIG DEAL. Sure , there are plenty of kids who have experimented and gotten into a Service Academy, but don't let it be a potential issue ....JUST SAY NO !
 

NJROTC-CC

Member
For other Candidates., especially the younger ones who haven't made the mistake yet --- MJ/Drug use is still illegal under federal law, and according to the Navy, regardless of what your State laws are. IT IS A BIG DEAL. Sure , there are plenty of kids who have experimented and gotten into a Service Academy, but don't let it be a potential issue ....JUST SAY NO !
+1. If you are only going to smoke drugs once or twice, why do it at all? Too much explaining. I would tell my DS either don't try it at all, or go all the way and pursue a non-military career.
 

Squidward

Member
Just an opinion from a candidate; if you are serious, have been serious and really want to make SA and Navy a way of life then you really should have thought about that BEFORE you did it.
You are a product of your decisions.
Sorry you are going thru this but an extra second before "participating" (not once but 3 times) should have happened first. I think SA's looking "the other way" is unfair to candidates like me who have made different decisions because I chose to be prepared for this day because I want this so badly.
- Just an opinion
 

Impulsive

Member
This is not meant to be personal towards OP, but in your Junior year of HS (or later), someone wishing to join the military as an Officer usually has an idea of how they wish to accomplish that goal, a SA, an ROTC Program, OTS/OCS, direct Commissioning. As someone who has begun the process of moving forward with a military officer career, one should review the different websites pertaining to those commissioning sources they are interested in. Even just speaking with an AO or ROO, or even someone at JROTC at their HS, it should be apparent that someone who wants this should maintain the proverbial "straight and narrow" while they are moving forward.

I am not associated with any academy or ROTC program, but knowing what has happened in the military ranks over the last 10 years or so, and knowing certain questions will be asked, I would have to question why someone who has begun the process would even consider using drugs not prescribed by a physician. I understand teenagers are tempted with peer pressure, and temptations, but if you one year out of entering a military officer program and should know what those requirements are, decisions may have consequences. I sincerely hope this does not come back to bite OP, or any other probably highly motivated, excellent candidates, but come on folks.....a one time use is one thing, but to go back and use again shows imho one of two things....either lack of judgment (not good for someone wanting to lead others), or disregard for knowing it is not the right thing to do, but doing it anyway. Many, many teenagers are faced with this very dilemma, be part of the "in crowd" and party with their friends, or "man up" and do what you should know is right and walk away. Either choice has real consequences....losing friends, being the "outcast" because you did not partake, and maybe even being distrusted by friends as "being a possible rat". Or on the other hand going thru what OP is now going thru, having to explain and really try to convince someone who does not know you that you would never do it again....after doing it multiple times prior.....difficult road I would think.

I wish OP the best of luck going forward, imho you have a difficult road to travel, and personally I hope you have learned a valuable life lesson. If for any reason you do not get your dream this year, do NOT give up, re-apply again.
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
I think SA's looking "the other way" is unfair to candidates like me who have made different decisions because I chose to be prepared for this day because I want this so badly.
Many, many teenagers are faced with this very dilemma, be part of the "in crowd" and party with their friends, or "man up" and do what you should know is right and walk away
It's really easy to be self righteous on the issue, but the truth is many candidates have tried it, have admitted it, have gotten into a Service Academy, and have done very well in the military. There have been alot of threads on this Forum about the effect of disclosure, and the only thing that can be said with certainty is that failure to disclose and subsequent discovery is far more serious than the applicant who has experimented.

For the record, I have not tried, not once !, but I don't hold it against those who have.
 

Capt MJ

10-Year Member
@Squidward

The SAs do not “look the other way.”

They look very closely, understanding that good future leaders learn from their past mistakes. They evaluate the candidate from every angle and make a deliberate decision informed by decades of experience in assessing potential.

Experienced leaders who can look back at their own mistakes, screw-ups, impulse decisions, and errors in judgement, who remain teachable, who avoid hubris, who infuse emotional intelligence and flexibility into their leadership style, are capable of doing very well with the wide variety of fallible human beings they are charged to lead - because they’ve been there.

I applaud you for the decisions you have made and your ability to say “no.” Others may arrive at that same point by a more circuitous route and at a later date.
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
For other Candidates., especially the younger ones who haven't made the mistake yet --- MJ/Drug use is still illegal under federal law, and according to the Navy, regardless of what your State laws are. IT IS A BIG DEAL. ....JUST SAY NO !
I cannot emphasize this enough. Recently, a mid on summer training decided to try gummy bears laced with THC (it was legal in the state where the use occurred). The mid got into trouble with local authorities and, to make a long story short, had to resign from USNA (or be subject to UCMJ proceedings and kicked out). Good kid who made a VERY bad decision that had lifelong consequences.

I realize that some mids do "get away with it." But others don't and chances are that eventually you'll be caught. Not to mention, you might get yourself or your shipmates killed. So, if you're not sure you're really done with drugs, please do everyone a favor and find a different college and career.
 

Squidward

Member
@Squidward

The SAs do not “look the other way.”

They look very closely, understanding that good future leaders learn from their past mistakes. They evaluate the candidate from every angle and make a deliberate decision informed by decades of experience in assessing potential.

Experienced leaders who can look back at their own mistakes, screw-ups, impulse decisions, and errors in judgement, who remain teachable, who avoid hubris, who infuse emotional intelligence and flexibility into their leadership style, are capable of doing very well with the wide variety of fallible human beings they are charged to lead - because they’ve been there.

I applaud you for the decisions you have made and your ability to say “no.” Others may arrive at that same point by a more circuitous route and at a later date.
Thank you Captain. I realize my response came off more harsh than I intended and I apologize. I am just hoping that my choices to "straight and narrow" are a foundation to a competitive package. I accept the feedback and thank you.
 
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