GPA to become a developmental engineer

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by monacamp163, Nov 30, 2018.

  1. monacamp163

    monacamp163 New Member

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    Hey,

    So I'm currently at an engineering university as a junior electrical engineering student in the AFROTC with hopes of being an actual electrical engineer in the Air Force. My GPA is about 3.4, I generally get 100 on the PT tests, and I was top 3rd in field training (not that the last two really matter when it comes to AFSCs, necessarily). I think this semester my GPA (hopefully, anyway) will rise above a 3.5 but I still don't know if that's enough.

    My former det captain went from aerospace engineering in school to a contract officer, which I really would prefer not to do. Are there any tips anyone has or advice to get an actual engineering job? Is 3.4-3.6 GPA enough to attain such a job?

    Thanks a ton.
     
  2. mil.intel

    mil.intel Member

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    Current AS400 & electrical and computer engineer.

    I just got my AFSC last week as 62E (developmental engineer)!

    First, there is very little "real" engineering job in the AF. Most of the developmental engineers work closely with 63's to supervise engineering projects, contracted out to private companies (Boeing, Northrup, LM, Raytheon etc). So if you are planning to get your hands dirty, I'm afraid you most likely will not.

    Let me know if you have any additional questions about my personal qualifications/stats. Good luck.
     
  3. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    Not true. There is a ton of "real" engineering in the Air Force, Air Guard and the Reserves.

    Both on the 62E side and the 32E side. If you want to get into the design world, then look for a design element in an Active Duty Prime BEEF or RED HORSE squadron or an S-Team or RED HORSE in the ANG/Reserves.

    Either way, be sure to get your licensure and you will get as much opportunity for engineering as you want.
     
  4. mil.intel

    mil.intel Member

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    I believe 32E is Civil? OP is EE. Also, I never heard from any officers I've spoken to during career fairs and those whom I've individually reached out to who acknowledged that there is a "ton" of real/hands-on engineering - rather, supervisory roles. Either way, RED HORSE looks like a cool opportunity.
     
  5. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    EE can be 32E or 62E. Yes, 32E is CE officer, but per CFETP 32EX, para. 3.1.1. CE officers can an undergrad or masters degree in "... civil, electrical, environmental, construction, architectural, mechanical, or industrial engineering..." I have met a few computer engineering 32E's, but those are rare and require a waiver.

    Also add AFCEC and AFIT to that list of places you will do real engineering in the Air Force. There are also sister service opportunities in the joint environment with USACE, NAVFAC, Seabees, etc.

    As a 62E, you will probably spend most of your early career at WPAFB, but from the 62E's I know there, they certainly do a lot of "real" engineering-- just more from a research standpoint.

    Military engineering is real engineering. Different from "standard" civilian engineering, but it is real nevertheless. RED HORSE and Prime BEEF have a ton of military engineering. AFCEC, AFIT, and the Staff Augmentation Teams have more civilian and/or research-styled engineering. All of it very, very real. :)

    PM me if you want more information.
     
  6. Wahoo2022

    Wahoo2022 New Member

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    I was a 32E3F Mechanical engineer in a civil engineering squadron. I did a ton of hands on design work, and you go thru months long tech schools at AFIT for both your speciality (mine was Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning) and in contingency engineering. Don’t let the name of the career field fool you - as the other poster said there are slots for electrical engineering in CE squadrons. I also deployed quite a bit and did a lot of expedient engineering work in the USA, Central America and in Southwest Asia - the experiences were putting your engineering skills to use in solving all kinds of challenges.
    I tested for and received my Professioanl Engineer license - quite straightforward because of all the design work I did. I also realize there are some bases where CE officers did more management of Architecture-Engineer firms vs hands on design, and really large jobs usually are handled by the Corps of Engineers or A/E firms. As your career progresses, you become more of a 32E3G generalist.
    I can’t speak to the Dev Engineering career field, but RED HORSE assignments, exchange slots with SeaBees are also other opportunities to put engineering skills to use.
     
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  7. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    These dour Airmen (O and E) that show up to career fairs and piss all over folks coming into the USAF just kill me.

    Congrats on the PE, Wahoo.
     
  8. Phyzix

    Phyzix Member

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    Congrats! I also got 62E and I'm also an EE :)

    In general though, from my det at least, every engineer who applied for 62E got 62E. GPAs ranged from 2.8-3.9
     
  9. mil.intel

    mil.intel Member

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    Congrats to you too. Where are you putting down for your Form 53?