Guidance appreciated!

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Erfontaine, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. Erfontaine

    Erfontaine New Member

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    Hello! My son is a rising HS senior and is completing his applications for ROTC scholarships. It is my understanding that the physical does not occur until after a scholarship has been awarded.

    My concern is this, as an infant, he had open heart surgery. This surgery did not involve the great vessels but, was an open heart surgery nonetheless. Je has been discharged from cardiology with no restrictions since 2005, does not require medications, etc. What are the possibilities of this being waived and him being able to begin an ROTC program?
     
  2. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    What's the reason for the surgery?

    Which ROTC program is he looking to do?
     
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  3. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty 5-Year Member

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    Your son will need to disclose his medical history, including the abovementioned procedure. The process can be lengthy, so you may want to gather records in advance.

    My layman's review of relevant sections of the 2017 version of Army Reg. 40-501 "Standards of Medical Fitness" and DoD Instruction 6130.03 "Medical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction into the Military Services" suggests to me that there would either be an automatic DQ, which could be waiverable, and at the least a request for more information.

    www.calculator.net/pdf/r40_501.pdf

    www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/DD/issuances/dodi/613003p.pdf

    If your son gets to the stage of being asked to go through the DODMERB process, it could be helpful to submit a supplementary statement from his cardiologist indicating that whatever condition may have existed was completely cured when he was an infant and presents no impediment whatsoever to strenuous activities associated with military service (assuming that to be the case, of course).
     
  4. Erfontaine

    Erfontaine New Member

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    He had a condition called TAPVR that required open heart surgery to correct. He has not had any restrictions and is not on any form of medication or treatment. In fact, the only way you would know is because he has a scar down his chest. He is looking into all of the ROTC programs but, is leaning towards the Army.
     
  5. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator 10-Year Member

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    Reading the DOD INSTRUCTION 6130.03, May 2018, Enclosure 4, page 20:

    q. Current or history of congenital anomalies of heart and great vessels (746).

    Okay, I'm not a physician and I don't work for DODMERB, so take this for what it's worth. I would "think" that this line would be applicable as TAPVR definitely applies to great vessels. Now...is it waiverable? That's something only the military physicians can answer.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  6. firecaptain

    firecaptain Firecaptain 5-Year Member

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    Good morning. I believe "flieger83" is 100% accurate..... you have to plan on your son's history to be disqualifying. HOWEVER, like virtually every other medical issue that is found to be disqualifying, there exists the possibility of a waiver. You simply won't know until you go through the process. And this is also why, throughout the forums, people talk about having plans " A,B,and C" lined up.
    We have some experience pursuing a medical waiver along the same lines. Please feel free to send me a PM.
     
  7. Erfontaine

    Erfontaine New Member

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    Firecaptain, I am anticipating a DQ, this I am gathering medical records, as well as scheduling an appointment with a cardiologist to get an updated exam/work up. Any advice or guidance you can offer will be greatly appreciated!! How successful were you at obtaining a waiver?
     
  8. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    The cardiologist should consider getting an echocardiogram on him to make sure there are no more structural issues.

    EKG would be good (24-hour holter even better but more resource intensive) because the surgical repair may cause abnormal heart beats (arrhythmias).

    Is there evidence that your DS has participate in high impact, aerobic sports? Would be good to show no issues with shortness of breath, fainting, or palpitations.
     
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