Importance of College Board Scores to the ROTC Scholarship Selection Process

AROTCPMS

Former Army ROTC PMS for Claremont McKenna and USC
5-Year Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
118
Hi Everyone,

After having observed the ROTC scholarship selection process over a six-year period as the PMS of two separate Army ROTC programs, combined with my research on the ROTC selection process for both the Air Force and the Navy, I can’t help remarking about the importance of the SAT/ACT in the overall selection process.

I base this on the following reasons:

Both the Army and the Air Force give separate and distinct points for SAT/ACT scores. The Army—17% and the Air Force a little over-30%. The Navy does not have a formal point system (from talking with people familiar with the process) but puts great weight in their selection boards on SAT/ACT scores.

All three services conduct a selection board. Having sat an Army ROTC Scholarship Board, (unfortunately or fortunately)- the SAT/ACT is a shortcut used by Army ROTC board members to “rack and stack” candidates. The board counts for 25% for Army ROTC. I go into more detail on my experience sitting such a board in this thread: https://www.serviceacademyforums.co...c-scholarship-board-member.67383/#post-664568

The Navy has no numeric system for their board but ranks SAT/ACT highly.

The Air Force is an exception as their board looks mainly at leadership, “motivation towards the Air Force,” the fitness test, and height/weight. The board score counts for 40% of the overall process. Nevertheless, board members do have access to ACT/SAT scores and from what I understand take them into account.


The Takeaway:

Board scores have an outsized influence on scholarship selection. Given that the Services have a superscore or best sitting policy for the SAT/ACT, it is to your advantage to take the test again if you can realistically improve your score. It is also advantageous to take both tests (SAT and ACT) because the highest score or scores from either testing service is used in the final evaluation.

Good luck as we start into the 2019-2020 Application year.

Robert Kirkland, LTC (Ret)
"The Insider's Guide to the Army [and Air Force] ROTC Scholarship for High School Students and their Parents" (Amazon)
 

emptynest2021

Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
72
We’ve read the book :)

Thank you for your insight! I was worried at first about DS minimum score on SAT (1240), but knew he had a strong background showing leadership capabilities.

He received a 4 yr type 7- non technical for AFROTC. We are extremely proud of him.
 

Donkopolous

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2018
Messages
51
Hi Everyone,

After having observed the ROTC scholarship selection process over a six-year period as the PMS of two separate Army ROTC programs, combined with my research on the ROTC selection process for both the Air Force and the Navy, I can’t help remarking about the importance of the SAT/ACT in the overall selection process.

I base this on the following reasons:

Both the Army and the Air Force give separate and distinct points for SAT/ACT scores. The Army—17% and the Air Force a little over-30%. The Navy does not have a formal point system (from talking with people familiar with the process) but puts great weight in their selection boards on SAT/ACT scores.

All three services conduct a selection board. Having sat an Army ROTC Scholarship Board, (unfortunately or fortunately)- the SAT/ACT is a shortcut used by Army ROTC board members to “rack and stack” candidates. The board counts for 25% for Army ROTC. I go into more detail on my experience sitting such a board in this thread: https://www.serviceacademyforums.co...c-scholarship-board-member.67383/#post-664568

The Navy has no numeric system for their board but ranks SAT/ACT highly.

The Air Force is an exception as their board looks mainly at leadership, “motivation towards the Air Force,” the fitness test, and height/weight. The board score counts for 40% of the overall process. Nevertheless, board members do have access to ACT/SAT scores and from what I understand take them into account.


The Takeaway:

Board scores have an outsized influence on scholarship selection. Given that the Services have a superscore or best sitting policy for the SAT/ACT, it is to your advantage to take the test again if you can realistically improve your score. It is also advantageous to take both tests (SAT and ACT) because the highest score or scores from either testing service is used in the final evaluation.

Good luck as we start into the 2019-2020 Application year.

Robert Kirkland, LTC (Ret)
"The Insider's Guide to the Army [and Air Force] ROTC Scholarship for High School Students and their Parents" (Amazon)
This information along with countless times we have used this site resulted in my DS receiving a 4 year NROTC MO scholarship and a 3 year AROTC which they have conveyed may turn to a 3+ potentially but not guaranteed.

Thank you for all of those that have provided guidance and insight into this long process.
 

HawkParent

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
10
It is interesting how much these board scores mean. I think it is probably next to impossible to go away from standardized testing.
 

HawkParent

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
10
I'm a bit confused in regards to whether the services do a superscore or best sitting?
 

kinnem

Moderator
5-Year Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
13,190
It varies by service and even by option within each service in some cases. See each services web site for how they hand;e the SAT/ACT scores.
 

Realtor10

New Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2019
Messages
9
Hi Everyone,

After having observed the ROTC scholarship selection process over a six-year period as the PMS of two separate Army ROTC programs, combined with my research on the ROTC selection process for both the Air Force and the Navy, I can’t help remarking about the importance of the SAT/ACT in the overall selection process.

I base this on the following reasons:

Both the Army and the Air Force give separate and distinct points for SAT/ACT scores. The Army—17% and the Air Force a little over-30%. The Navy does not have a formal point system (from talking with people familiar with the process) but puts great weight in their selection boards on SAT/ACT scores.

All three services conduct a selection board. Having sat an Army ROTC Scholarship Board, (unfortunately or fortunately)- the SAT/ACT is a shortcut used by Army ROTC board members to “rack and stack” candidates. The board counts for 25% for Army ROTC. I go into more detail on my experience sitting such a board in this thread: https://www.serviceacademyforums.co...c-scholarship-board-member.67383/#post-664568

The Navy has no numeric system for their board but ranks SAT/ACT highly.

The Air Force is an exception as their board looks mainly at leadership, “motivation towards the Air Force,” the fitness test, and height/weight. The board score counts for 40% of the overall process. Nevertheless, board members do have access to ACT/SAT scores and from what I understand take them into account.


The Takeaway:

Board scores have an outsized influence on scholarship selection. Given that the Services have a superscore or best sitting policy for the SAT/ACT, it is to your advantage to take the test again if you can realistically improve your score. It is also advantageous to take both tests (SAT and ACT) because the highest score or scores from either testing service is used in the final evaluation.

Good luck as we start into the 2019-2020 Application year.

Robert Kirkland, LTC (Ret)
"The Insider's Guide to the Army [and Air Force] ROTC Scholarship for High School Students and their Parents" (Amazon)
I really wish the College Boards were not as emphasized as they are but I understand why.
 
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