Jump School

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by mattjr96, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. mattjr96

    mattjr96 Member

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    All,

    I can't seem to find much info online about this so I'll take to the wisdom on here. I commission in May as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Marine Corps and will likely be waiting until September (earliest) or January (more likely) for TBS. I was wanting to do Army jump school in between instead of sitting around the NROTC offices, hanging out, and going to the gym.

    Does anyone know if newly commissioned 2nd Lt's can even apply or heard of this happening before? Thanks
     
  2. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Yes, you can go to the army's jump school. Several in DS's jump class last summer from other services.

    I don't know the application procedures, but you can find the airborne school website by googling US Army Airborne School.
     
  3. Dadx4

    Dadx4 Member

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    I went to Fort Benning to become a 5-jump-chump as a Navy Ensign and then jumped with EOD/SEALs. Talk to your unit education and training officer or your career counselor and see about getting a jump slot.
     
  4. mattjr96

    mattjr96 Member

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    Awesome thanks. It seems the 5-7 month wait before TBS would definitely be ample time for me to apply, I'll look into the resources you suggested. Much appreciated
     
  5. Infantry_Dad

    Infantry_Dad 5-Year Member

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    NorwichDad and mattjr96 like this.
  6. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

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    It’s more complicated than that. Have you been told you will be going active duty upon commission? The norm for ROTC commissions is to commission and then wait for TBS. This means you won’t report for active duty until usually a day or two prior to TBS start day.

    Also the USMC would be paying for you school slot, TAD, etc. What is the need for the training? The USMC doesn’t do a lot of jumping. You don’t have an MOS yet, so the need wouldn’t be known yet.

    The large majority of Lts in your shoes go home or hang around schools working part time and staying in shape waiting to report to TBS. Kinnem, isn’t that what your DS did?
     
  7. mattjr96

    mattjr96 Member

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    Yep, i'll commission into active duty. In the past you'd be correct about the time prior to TBS. However, now upon commission Marine Officers out of NROTC get paid and stashed much like the Navy Ensigns out of NROTC at their host units or any unit or recruiting station within 50 miles of their home of record.

    In regards to the MOS statement that's the part that I was thinking about the most. I did not know if newly commissioned Lt's prior to TBS have a "holding MOS" or have no MOS, thus making myself ineligible to apply to the course.

    Thanks
     
  8. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

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    They do have a generic MOS, can’t remember what it is. I still doubt the USMC is going to spend money to send you to a non-required school, especially for a Lt who hasn’t gone to TBS. Very few Marines jump. Recon, MARSOC and a few in radio and logistics battalions that support these elements or have a specialized skill. There are a few options while waiting for TBS... stay at your unit, go to TBS and wait in Mike Company or find something like OSO recruiting back home on Permissive TAD (no cost TAD). Mike company sucks.
     
  9. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt 5-Year Member

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    OP: I accept that things can change and its possible that newly commissioned NROTC Marine Officers start on active duty after commissioning but I have to say I am skeptical. My DS is only out a couple of years and he was commissioned into "limbo" until reporting to TBS 5-6 months later . When I commissioned (back when dinosaurs roamed the earth) we went straight to Quantico from graduation. Are you sure about your situation?

    The best answer to your question probably lies with the MOI and AMOI at your unit. I think Hoops has it right.

    As I recall, the "student" MOS had 9's in it. 0199 or something?

    Finally, the best advice I can give is to get yourself squared away and prepared for TBS. Your MOS assignment will be the intersection of your TBS grades, peer evaluations, instructor recommendations, and personal choices.
     
  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Yes, my kid commissioned in May and was supposed to report to TBS (and go active) in mid-September. In late July his report date was moved up to mid-August. During those summer months he had his ideal job, working the bar and giving tours at a craft brewery. When leading a tour he always introduced himself as Uncle Sam's newest Lieutentant.

    I agree with you that chances for flight school would be slim or none until after TBS and even then it will depend on many factors.
     
  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    If they are doing that for everyone, it's something very new. I've known it to happen to a select few, but not everyone.
     
  12. Pima

    Pima 10-Year Member

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    I am going to bring up something that nobody else has...the what if?

    My DH was an AF Jump ALO, assigned to the 82nd. At Benning, another AF officer was going through the jump school at the same time, unfortunately for him he landed wrong, broke his ankle and had to have surgery (pins). Needless to say, his life went upside down within a matter of 24-48 hrs.

    Thus, what if? Are those 6 jumps that get you the chance to wear jump wings worth the risk/ chance of breaking a leg or an arm and delaying your TBS?
     
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  13. NTWLF ONE

    NTWLF ONE Member

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    Brand new ENS and 2LT’s don’t do Operational Risk Management well....only us old, senior guys do...:)
     
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  14. Dadx4

    Dadx4 Member

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    Jump school was just what I needed in medical school. I went to Ft. Benning between my first and second years. It's not just about earning the wings. It's building confidence and a career. If mattjr96 has the time and the slot available, I say go for it. Great training IMHO.
     
  15. USMAROTCFamily

    USMAROTCFamily 5-Year Member

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    Even worse, when I was in ROTC, a friend of mine in the class ahead of me, broke his leg on one of his jumps. Not only did he not get his jump wings, but the break was so bad that it didn't heal properly and he couldn't even be commissioned. So he was permanently DQ and wasn't eligible for any VA assistance or any other services.
     
  16. Dadx4

    Dadx4 Member

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    We had an officer in jump school who sprained her ankle on her fourth jump. She managed to get off the drop zone on her own. The next day was the fifth and final jump. She ran to the TARMAC on the sprain, jumped a fifth time, and literally crawled off of the drop zone with her combat gear and graduated. Smart: NO. Motivating: YES.
     
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  17. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    During orientation on the first day of jump school someone asked, "Sergeant, I know we have a reserve chute in case the main doesn't open, but what do we do if the reserve doesn't open?"

    Black Hat calmly answered, "Simple, Airborne. You die. No one said this wasn't dangerous."
     
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  18. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Dadx4, I agree training is great. Jump school would definitely help in confidence. But, it’s also about need. In tight budget constraints, why send a brand new butter bars who doesn’t have an MOS yet, to a school that is not needed? The USMC gets very few jump
    slots and the need is not there. It also costs money, the school isn’t free. The USMC will be charged for that spot on top of TAD funds.

    On a side note, as mentioned by some of the the other posters, I am not convinced the USMC has changed policy on ROTC commissions being active duty on day 1. That would be a big policy change that costs the USMC a lot of $. Yes they commission active duty, but they don’t go into an active status until they report to TBS. It is why USNA and MECEP grads report first to TBS and then ROTC, OCC and PLC grads get the later dates. Be curious to hear what the MOI says after the OP speaks with them.
     
  19. Pima

    Pima 10-Year Member

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    I would also think that they don't do that because it changes their line number for promotion. At least for the AF it has always been the way NavyHoops said because they always have the top line numbers for that year group due to their DOR. If they did it the way the OP is saying than it would be very possible that USNA grads would be hundreds of numbers down the line from the get go.
    ~ Many colleges graduate/commission in the beginning of May, weeks before the SAs. Line number for SA grads on the day they graduate are higher because they are AD that day. ROTC grads line number/DOR is the avg date between their commission and AD date. IE my DS commissioned May 25th, reported ADAF on Sept 30th, his DOR is July 9th.
     
  20. Soldiergriz

    Soldiergriz Husband, Dad, Soldier

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    I agree with this. There is no downside to asking. There is an abundance of risk aversion mentioned in responses. You are a MARINE.

    Additionally, no opinion on this forum is even remotely equal to answers provided by your chain of command. Ask them.
     
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