Medical Advice Needed

KBM

New Member
My son has just announced that he would like to apply to USNA as well as pursue ROTC scholarships at various universities. He was diagnosed with asthma at age 13, although he doesn't suffer significant symptoms (he still uses an inhaler periodically, however). He is also highly allergic to chlorine, which is problematic because he is a competitive swimmer. While his external skin isn't affected by chlorine, his nasal passages balloon to such a degree, they almost completely constrict his airflow Traditional treatment was unsuccessful, so he had laser turbinate reduction surgery when he was 15 so he could continue to swim. He still suffers from a chronic cough because of exposure to chlorine. Does anyone on this thread think he will be granted a medical waiver? He was also diagnosed with chronic fatigue when he was 12. I would appreciate any insights on this matter.
 
I don’t think anyone here can answer for certain whether or not he will be qualified; that being said, I have had quite a long and exhausting process with DoDMERB already and I have almost no serious medical problems. But, that should not discourage you. If he really wants it, the only way to find out is to apply. But, I’d do some research into disqualifying conditions for which a waiver is not possible first to be sure you aren’t completely wasting your time.
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
I think a waiver will be an uphill battle on both issues. You might have an easier time with the second issue at a school that doesn't value swimming as much as USNA, such as USMA or USAFA. Of course, the only way you'll know is to go through the process. Just have realistic expectations.
 

parent

BGO
5-Year Member
@KBM As stated before have realistic expectations. IMHO the chances are slim. First he will be automatically DQ'd due to the asthma issue and the inhaler use. Second, the persistent cough and surgery at 15 will probably be a DQ. Even saying this if he has a strong application any or all of the academies nmay choose to ask for a waiver. Apply and see where it goes.
He is also way behind in the process for nominations. Senators (in OH) deadline has passed and Congressman is due in 5 days.
 
@KBM As stated before have realistic expectations. IMHO the chances are slim. First he will be automatically DQ'd due to the asthma issue and the inhaler use. Second, the persistent cough and surgery at 15 will probably be a DQ. Even saying this if he has a strong application any or all of the academies nmay choose to ask for a waiver. Apply and see where it goes.
He is also way behind in the process for nominations. Senators (in OH) deadline has passed and Congressman is due in 5 days.
Same for my district.
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
One thing to add . . . the US military is not an "equal opportunity employer" when it comes to medical issues. It can't be. Thus, there are some absolutely terrific young men and women whose medical history/conditions make them unsuitable for military service. Your DS will likely be one of those.

For those wishing to serve their country, there are other paths, depending on interests. NSA and CIA are always looking for good people. There are humanitarian organizations such as the Peace Corps. Do some research and think broadly.
 

justdoit19

Member
One thing to add . . . the US military is not an "equal opportunity employer" when it comes to medical issues. It can't be. Thus, there are some absolutely terrific young men and women whose medical history/conditions make them unsuitable for military service. Your DS will likely be one of those.

For those wishing to serve their country, there are other paths, depending on interests. NSA and CIA are always looking for good people. There are humanitarian organizations such as the Peace Corps. Do some research and think broadly.
Yep...our firstborn son wanted a SA badly. The bottom line, he couldn't bc of knee surgeries. BUT he is on a path through ANG, that he is loving. Knee issues weren't a problem there. MANY different ways to skin a cat, and achieve your dreams!
 

Impulsive

Member
My son has just announced that he would like to apply to USNA as well as pursue ROTC scholarships at various universities. He was diagnosed with asthma at age 13, although he doesn't suffer significant symptoms (he still uses an inhaler periodically, however). He is also highly allergic to chlorine, which is problematic because he is a competitive swimmer. While his external skin isn't affected by chlorine, his nasal passages balloon to such a degree, they almost completely constrict his airflow Traditional treatment was unsuccessful, so he had laser turbinate reduction surgery when he was 15 so he could continue to swim. He still suffers from a chronic cough because of exposure to chlorine. Does anyone on this thread think he will be granted a medical waiver? He was also diagnosed with chronic fatigue when he was 12. I would appreciate any insights on this matter.
First off, I am not a doctor, nor am I affiliated with any waiver authority. Having said that, unfortunately IMHO I would have to agree with most of the other posters here. Having to use an inhaler, and having a chronic cough is probably going to cause your DS some pretty serious waiver issues. That is not to say he cannot get one, you never know till you try, BUT, please make sure your son has a viable Plan B (civilian college) if the military does not grant a waiver. You did not mention what he would like to do in the military, but some careers are open to what is called "Direct Commissioning", where if you have the appropriate education and qualifications sometimes you can enter the military directly into that speciality (Law, Medicine, Some Engineering) and possibly these conditions are more likely to be waived if your son can get off the inhaler while in college. I am of the belief that everything happens for a reason, and if someone truly wants to serve, there is always Federal Law Enforcement, CIA/NSA intelligence analyst, or other "civilian" military support jobs. Don't give up because he is not waived for USNA or ROTC, keep looking for avenues that he can be happy in...:)
 

Norfolk63

BGO and MidDad
5-Year Member
For what it's worth, when my high schooler first voiced an interest in the USNA and NROTC, the first thing I did was to make an appointment with our family doctor (who also happened to be an AF doctor) and our eye doctor to give him a detailed physical in order to uncover any disqualifying conditions. I didn't want to put my kid through the rigorous app process, getting his hopes up, only to be knee-capped by a medical condition.
 

momofmod

Member
My son has just announced that he would like to apply to USNA as well as pursue ROTC scholarships at various universities. He was diagnosed with asthma at age 13, although he doesn't suffer significant symptoms (he still uses an inhaler periodically, however). He is also highly allergic to chlorine, which is problematic because he is a competitive swimmer. While his external skin isn't affected by chlorine, his nasal passages balloon to such a degree, they almost completely constrict his airflow Traditional treatment was unsuccessful, so he had laser turbinate reduction surgery when he was 15 so he could continue to swim. He still suffers from a chronic cough because of exposure to chlorine. Does anyone on this thread think he will be granted a medical waiver? He was also diagnosed with chronic fatigue when he was 12. I would appreciate any insights on this matter.
Is your son currently a senior in HS? I'm having trouble figuring that out. If so, as stated by so many others, he's way late to the party. Regarding his medical condition, my son had one MRI when he was a junior in HS on a shoulder. It came back clean and showed no injury but still triggered a medical DQ and required a waiver. I can't imagine what your son's issues will lead to. Good luck to him!
 
Top