Medical

apollo 1211

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Dec 20, 2023
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I am re applying and last year I got medically disqualified for shellfish. I just took an oral food challeneg with shellfish ate a couple peices of shrimp and had no reaction. I am having my doctor write a not to dodmerb saying I had no reaction and my allergy is very minimal if any. I got disqualified for "History of acute allergy to shellfish" but it is not acute. Does anyone know if they can take away the disqualification or will it just be easier to get a waiver?
 
I'm not familiar with the guidelines around shellfish allergies but I'm sure if you search "shellfish" you will find lots of discussion and maybe a link to where you can read about the DODMERB guidelines.

During your last application cycle when you received a DQ, did USAFA request a waiver review on your behalf?
 
I'm not familiar with the guidelines around shellfish allergies but I'm sure if you search "shellfish" you will find lots of discussion and maybe a link to where you can read about the DODMERB guidelines.

During your last application cycle when you received a DQ, did USAFA request a waiver review on your behalf?
They did not
 
I’m not trying to sound like a wise guy here and am asking for educational purposes.

Does eating two shrimp qualify as an oral challenge?
 
my allergy is very minimal if any. I got disqualified for "History of acute allergy to shellfish" but it is not acute. Does anyone know if they can take away the disqualification or will it just be easier to get a waiver
You do have a history of some sort of reaction to shellfish. As reported by you.

The answer to the question you posed, is that no, a founded DQ cannot be removed. You have an existing DQ for a reaction to shellfish.

Each accession program decides IF they want to pursue a waiver for a DQ. This is not something you initiate. Its done via whichever program you are talking about. Some things cannot be waived. Some are by one program, and not another. Some are frequently waived.

It would make sense, that if you are not a candidate they want to offer an appointment/scholarship to, a waiver may never be pursued. So there isn’t a 100 pct answer to your question.

Idk what program you are wondering about, but maybe reaching out to them would give you some insight.
 
I’m not trying to sound like a wise guy here and am asking for educational purposes.

Does eating two shrimp qualify as an oral challenge?
They said it was enough shrimp to say that I am able to be around and eat a little if on accident, but I am staying away from it. It just proves that I can eat and be around it no problem.
 
You do have a history of some sort of reaction to shellfish. As reported by you.

The answer to the question you posed, is that no, a founded DQ cannot be removed. You have an existing DQ for a reaction to shellfish.

Each accession program decides IF they want to pursue a waiver for a DQ. This is not something you initiate. Its done via whichever program you are talking about. Some things cannot be waived. Some are by one program, and not another. Some are frequently waived.

It would make sense, that if you are not a candidate they want to offer an appointment/scholarship to, a waiver may never be pursued. So there isn’t a 100 pct answer to your question.

Idk what program you are wondering about, but maybe reaching out to them would give you some insight.
USAFA, USMA
 
When I was going through the waiver process for an immune/allergy condition, the AFROTC waiver authority asked for a letter from my doctor and allergist detailing my condition, triggers/reactions, the severity, and whether they would recommend me to be cleared for military environments. I was also required to do an IgE blood test.

USAFA and USMA may want different things from you - some things that qualify for a waiver from one branch may not be considered for a waiver in another branch. If USMA/USAFA didn't see you as a candidate they would like to appoint, they may have decided not to start you through the waiver process. The best thing you can do at this point is probably to reach out to admissions for whatever program you intend to apply to and see what guidance they can offer. DoDMERB is a tricky system especially for allergies, I wish you the best of luck!
 
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