MO College Program Progression: Up or Out?

Hi, just back from Parent Weekend with my boy. Everything is going well academically, personally, and with ROTC. He is a programmer and has substantial merit aid. I actually thought him not receiving the NROTC scholarship was a blessing. He was free to pursue a career as an officer in the Corps, but not obligated. Paying the difference was reasonable cost for flexibility.

During the initial counseling session DS was told there is an expectation that a MID will earn a scholarship or be asked to leave the program. His unscientific survey is that there are no MID3+ programmers. Also, he was told until 2 years ago, programmers were not allowed into the MO. Advanced Standing did not come up.

Is this arrangement common?
 
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NJROTC-CC

Member
I guess what they are saying is that if a programmer is good enough to earn advanced standing, he will win a 2 year scholarship and visa versa. Of course, if a programmer does not earn advanced standing, he or she is out. Once you are in MID3+, you are committed, and I guess not considered a programmer anymore. (Also, I think you meant that he did not receive the 4 year NROTC scholarship, and that is a blessing.)
 

USMCGrunt

5-Year Member
NAVY ROTC COLLEGE PROGRAM
  • Applicants selected from students already attending or accepted by colleges with Navy ROTC programs
  • Provides uniforms and Naval Science textbooks.
  • College Program students selected for "advanced standing" receive a stipend for maximum of 20 months. Advance standing is only available starting the junior year of college. Stipend per academic month is $350 junior year and $400 senior year.
    • Students will complete naval science and other university courses, a few specific university courses, and attend one summer training session
    • Normally at sea for Navy midshipmen
    • Normally at Quantico, VA for Marine Corps midshipmen
  • On graduation, two- and four-year College Program midshipmen may be commissioned ensigns in the Naval Service or second lieutenants in the Marine Corps

Also, if a midshipman is not granted Advance Standing by the beginning of junior year, he will be disenrolled from the ROTC program.
 
NAVY ROTC COLLEGE PROGRAM
Also, if a midshipman is not granted Advance Standing by the beginning of the junior year, he will be disenrolled from the ROTC program.
OK, so that last bit in bold is that part I had not seen written down anywhere.

This changes the cost/benefit calculation a bit. Advanced Standing = 3yr obligation. Not clear on 2/3 yr scholarship service requirements but full scholarship is 4 yrs. So it's a good idea for him to try for the intermediate scholarship opportunities when they present, regardless of his other scholarships.
 

USMCGrunt

5-Year Member
@Torero_dad - I pulled that information from a university NROTC FAQ website. It was not on the NROTC scholarship application website (which is why I posted it below the web address which addressed the material above). This may have been confusing - if so, I apologize.

Disenrollment as described was how I understood the situation and saw it verified so I posted the information as a fact. I suppose that "trust but verify" applies here. Feel free to google the question and you will find lots of university FAQ's where this disenrollment action is discussed. I am sure that somewhere in the deep web you can find this on an official NROTC website as well.
 

USMCGrunt

5-Year Member
Also, your DS should know that there are a few other commissioning paths: PLC and OCS. Each comes with its own set of requirements, benefits, and risks.

Good luck to your DS.
 

Impulsive

Member
Hi, just back from Parent Weekend with my boy. Everything is going well academically, personally, and with ROTC. He is a programmer and has substantial merit aid. I actually thought him not receiving the NROTC scholarship was a blessing. He was free to pursue a career as an officer in the Corps, but not obligated. Paying the difference was reasonable cost for flexibility.

During the initial counseling session DS was told there is an expectation that a MID will earn a scholarship or be asked to leave the program. His unscientific survey is that there are no MID3+ programmers. Also, he was told until 2 years ago, programmers were not allowed into the MO. Advanced Standing did not come up.

Is this arrangement common?
+1, I agree with you. NOT having the NROTC Scholarship is a blessing in that IF the student decides later on in the program that it is not for them, they have NO financial, or service responsibility until they contract. Not being a scholarship recipient gives the MIDN the upper hand as to flexibility in majors too, and as long as they excel as a MIDN a lot of Units offer "in house" 2 yr scholarships for MIDNS to contract entering their junior year. If you have the flexibility of a "Full Ride" academically at the University you want, you do not need an NROTC Scholarship as the program pays for books and uniforms, and some cover class fees for Naval Science Classes.

I did read somewhere I think that "Advance Standing MIDNS" sign a contract similar to scholarship students for service obligation except that if they fail to Commission there is no military service obligation because the Navy did not spend any money putting them thru the program, whereas "Scholarship" contracts, if you fail to Commission, there is an "enlisted" obligation or pay back of money? Is this correct?
 
@Torero_dad - I pulled that information from a university NROTC FAQ website. It was not on the NROTC scholarship application website (which is why I posted it below the web address which addressed the material above). This may have been confusing - if so, I apologize.

Disenrollment as described was how I understood the situation and saw it verified so I posted the information as a fact. I suppose that "trust but verify" applies here. Feel free to google the question and you will find lots of university FAQ's where this disenrollment action is discussed. I am sure that somewhere in the deep web you can find this on an official NROTC website as well.
Thanks. Understand the sourcing, and your experience matches what DS was told. I think it's reasonable that by Junior year he'll be sure. This really needs to be his decision and I'm just trying to be familiar enough to be a sounding board.
 

kinnem

Moderator
5-Year Member
Good council above. Good luck to your son. I bet he's dong great. Some folks are just cut out to be Marines, although they come in many different shapes and sizes.
 

ProudDad17

Member
+1, I agree with you. NOT having the NROTC Scholarship is a blessing in that IF the student decides later on in the program that it is not for them, they have NO financial, or service responsibility until they contract. Not being a scholarship recipient gives the MIDN the upper hand as to flexibility in majors too, and as long as they excel as a MIDN a lot of Units offer "in house" 2 yr scholarships for MIDNS to contract entering their junior year. If you have the flexibility of a "Full Ride" academically at the University you want, you do not need an NROTC Scholarship as the program pays for books and uniforms, and some cover class fees for Naval Science Classes.

I did read somewhere I think that "Advance Standing MIDNS" sign a contract similar to scholarship students for service obligation except that if they fail to Commission there is no military service obligation because the Navy did not spend any money putting them thru the program, whereas "Scholarship" contracts, if you fail to Commission, there is an "enlisted" obligation or pay back of money? Is this correct?
For clarification, NROTC does not offer any "in house" or unit based scholarships. All scholarships and Advanced Standing are national competitions. Also, there are cases where if a mid is not awarded a scholarship or Advanced Standing by the end of their sophomore year, the PNS can retain the mid as a college programmer into their junior year.
 

USMCGrunt

5-Year Member
I think it's reasonable that by Junior year he'll be sure. This really needs to be his decision and I'm just trying to be familiar enough to be a sounding board.
@Torero_dad - I realize that this is your DS' decision as you so note. I also note that these are your posts not your son's. Your son is entitled to process the facts and take all the time allotted to make his decision on whether the USMC is the right choice. But that said, the USMC does appreciate decisiveness (one of the 14 USMC Leadership Traits) and your son should form his opinion given the exposure his is given in a timely manner.

I wish him the best of luck.
 

KuzNROTC

Member
If a MIDN picks up a 4, 3, or 2 year scholarship, the minimum service commitment for Marine Options is 4 years, and Navy Options 5 years. If a MIDN picks up Advanced Standing, the minimum service commitment is 3 years. Granted, there are communities, such as pilot and submarines that commit a longer service commitment.

Another thing that a lot of people do not know is that you become eligible for the Post 911 GI Bill once the Advanced Standing contract is up. Vice versa, anyone that picks up a scholarship (whether 4, 3, or 2 year) has to commit there minimum service obligation, as well as another 36 months on top of that. In summary, someone that picks up Advanced Standing is eligible for the full Post 911 GI Bill at their 3 year mark, while someone on scholarship becomes eligible for the full GI Bill at their 7/8 year mark (depending on whether someone goes Navy or Marine).

So if he is in no dire need to fund his education, and is looking forward to further education after the military, such as graduate school, this may seem like a very good option for him to consider.
 
@Torero_dad - I realize that this is your DS' decision as you so note. I also note that these are your posts not your son's. Your son is entitled to process the facts and take all the time allotted to make his decision on whether the USMC is the right choice. But that said, the USMC does appreciate decisiveness (one of the 14 USMC Leadership Traits) and your son should form his opinion given the exposure his is given in a timely manner.

I wish him the best of luck.
Good advice, I think he would take it in a blink of an eye. I was counseling him based on my understanding of the cost/benefits. Having a wealth of choices is a good problem for him to have!

He called last night with news he's assigned an assistant billet this semester with a glide path to the lead billet in spring. So things are moving along.
 

kinnem

Moderator
5-Year Member
Good advice, I think he would take it in a blink of an eye. I was counseling him based on my understanding of the cost/benefits. Having a wealth of choices is a good problem for him to have!

He called last night with news he's assigned an assistant billet this semester with a glide path to the lead billet in spring. So things are moving along.
I'm assuming your son is in the first semester of his freshman year. In that case landing a billet as anything is a big deal. In most units that wouldn't happen until his second semester. Well done!
 
You don't mention this in your original posting, but is your son getting his application together to re-apply for the national scholarship right now? He won't win a scholarship (and a surer route) unless he applies.
 
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