New Colorblindness Test

RyeBread

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Jun 5, 2018
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My son is a USCGA Scholar's program candidate pending a Medical Waiver for Colorblindness. The Scholar's Handbook indicates a favorable waiver if the candidate passes the Farnsworth exam, which he did. However, we were informed this week that he must take a newly instituted test, Waggoner Computerized Color Vision Test (CCVT). This directive began March 1, 2018.

Under the circumstances I feel the goalposts have been moved at the last moment. If my son fails the new test, what chances are there for an appeal and ultimate waiver? Any suggestions for how to advocate for my son?
 

believe2023

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Jun 7, 2017
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My son is a USCGA Scholar's program candidate pending a Medical Waiver for Colorblindness. The Scholar's Handbook indicates a favorable waiver if the candidate passes the Farnsworth exam, which he did. However, we were informed this week that he must take a newly instituted test, Waggoner Computerized Color Vision Test (CCVT). This directive began March 1, 2018.

Under the circumstances I feel the goalposts have been moved at the last moment. If my son fails the new test, what chances are there for an appeal and ultimate waiver? Any suggestions for how to advocate for my son?

I just read your post and I was curious if your DS knew he was color-blind before applying to the USCGA. I always thought that even if you are slightly color-blind, you cannot apply.
 

RyeBread

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My son is a USCGA Scholar's program candidate pending a Medical Waiver for Colorblindness. The Scholar's Handbook indicates a favorable waiver if the candidate passes the Farnsworth exam, which he did. However, we were informed this week that he must take a newly instituted test, Waggoner Computerized Color Vision Test (CCVT). This directive began March 1, 2018.

Under the circumstances I feel the goalposts have been moved at the last moment. If my son fails the new test, what chances are there for an appeal and ultimate waiver? Any suggestions for how to advocate for my son?

I just read your post and I was curious if your DS knew he was color-blind before applying to the USCGA. I always thought that even if you are slightly color-blind, you cannot apply.
Yes, his condition was known. However, it was also known that mild colorblindness could be granted a waiver based upon successfully passing the Farnsworth test.
 

Capt MJ

Ancient Mariner
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Out of professional interest, I looked up the directive:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDHSCG/bulletins/1dec0f4

For the OP, I think your DS will have to take his chances and see how he does. Decisions like this in the military world are often rooted in utilitarianism; the good of the many overrides the good of the few. The effective date draws a line, and there will be those who fall on either side of it. My best guess is for your son to have a conversation with whoever your CGAS POC is, to see if any grandfathering is going to apply. There has already been an investment in your son. Now, if the info on the more stringent requirement came from that same POC, that steepens the grade.

I’m sorry this is happening. Big Military, when it gets rolling, occasionally chews up people in its path.
 

Gaff1225

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Oct 30, 2017
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Good Morning, the link that CAPT MJ posted came from Coast Guard Headquarters. They are the governing body for CG-wide policies (including medical standards). Those messages that you see in the link above are put out when a policy change needs to be made immediately and the CG community as a whole need to be made aware of it. These messages are a more timely way to get the information out, rather than updating numerous manuals (some hundreds of pages long) for the sake of one paragraph. To my knowledge, the FARNSWORTH has or is being removed from use at ALL service academies, as the lantern is no longer being produced. If your son took the Farnsworth test after the new standard came out (looks like 3/1/18) then the results would not be accepted (that is how I read that message in the link). Color vision deficiency of ANY kind is not waiver-able in ANY sea going service, as most new officers are stationed on ships and must be able to navigate a large billion dollar ship safely through shipping channels and in and out of busy ports. If you cannot see colors and tell different aids to navigation and navigation lights apart, the safety of alot people and property is at risk. A liability that sea going services wouldn't be willing to gamble with. It is my understanding, that if a person fails the color vision testing, they have every right to appeal but it wouldn't be hopeful of a favorable appeal outcome.
 

Gaff1225

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My son is a USCGA Scholar's program candidate pending a Medical Waiver for Colorblindness. The Scholar's Handbook indicates a favorable waiver if the candidate passes the Farnsworth exam, which he did. However, we were informed this week that he must take a newly instituted test, Waggoner Computerized Color Vision Test (CCVT). This directive began March 1, 2018.

Under the circumstances I feel the goalposts have been moved at the last moment. If my son fails the new test, what chances are there for an appeal and ultimate waiver? Any suggestions for how to advocate for my son?

I just read your post and I was curious if your DS knew he was color-blind before applying to the USCGA. I always thought that even if you are slightly color-blind, you cannot apply.
Anyone can apply to a service academy, but would most likely be denied entrance (at least in the seagoing services) during the medical waiver process.
 

GoCubbies

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Feb 13, 2018
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My son is a USCGA Scholar's program candidate pending a Medical Waiver for Colorblindness. The Scholar's Handbook indicates a favorable waiver if the candidate passes the Farnsworth exam, which he did. However, we were informed this week that he must take a newly instituted test, Waggoner Computerized Color Vision Test (CCVT). This directive began March 1, 2018.

Under the circumstances I feel the goalposts have been moved at the last moment. If my son fails the new test, what chances are there for an appeal and ultimate waiver? Any suggestions for how to advocate for my son?


How bad did he fail the Pseudo-Isochromatic Plates (PIP)? If he gets 10 of our 14 plates correctly, then he passes. It used to be you had to get 12 out of 14 plates correctly to pass.


Do you know which standard was used when he failed the PIP the first time which prompted the FALANT/OPTEC 900?
 

RyeBread

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He passed 9 of 14 plates (Ishihari's is all I know). My reading of the Bulletin is he has to pass 10/14. The 12/14 is for aviators, I think.
 

believe2023

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Jun 7, 2017
Messages
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My son is a USCGA Scholar's program candidate pending a Medical Waiver for Colorblindness. The Scholar's Handbook indicates a favorable waiver if the candidate passes the Farnsworth exam, which he did. However, we were informed this week that he must take a newly instituted test, Waggoner Computerized Color Vision Test (CCVT). This directive began March 1, 2018.

Under the circumstances I feel the goalposts have been moved at the last moment. If my son fails the new test, what chances are there for an appeal and ultimate waiver? Any suggestions for how to advocate for my son?

I just read your post and I was curious if your DS knew he was color-blind before applying to the USCGA. I always thought that even if you are slightly color-blind, you cannot apply.
Anyone can apply to a service academy, but would most likely be denied entrance (at least in the seagoing services) during the medical waiver process.

It is my understanding that the USAFA, USMA and The Marines are not as concerned with slight colorblindness.. AF, as long as you don't want to fly) The USNA saves waiver spots specifically for color-blind students, that will then be commissioned with restrictions. The USMMA states on their website "do not apply if you are color deficient" and a contact from the USCGA said you can enlist, but not attend the academy. If any know of changes to any of this, please pass along. It is very much appreciated.
 

RyeBread

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From the bulletin:

"3. As per REF (E), the passing score for Pseudo-Isochromatic Plates (PIP) for aviation
personnel is 12/14 correctly identified red/green numerical test plates. As per
REF (F), the passing score for non-aviation personnel required to have color vision
testing is 10/14 correctly identified red/green numerical test plates."

Do you know if your contact indicated that USCGA is adopting the 10/14 or the more stringent 12/14 threshold?
 

Gaff1225

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Oct 30, 2017
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The message/bulletin states 12/14 for aviation and 10/14 for non-aviation. That message is the most recent standard. Being that your son is an applicant to the CG Academy and would be considered aviation-personnel the 10/14 score would be the benchmark he needed to hit. I believe that DoDMERB also requires 10/14 plates to be considered qualified/passing for CG applications.
 

Gaff1225

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Oct 30, 2017
Messages
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The message/bulletin states 12/14 for aviation and 10/14 for non-aviation. That message is the most recent standard. Being that your son is an applicant to the CG Academy and would be considered aviation-personnel the 10/14 score would be the benchmark he needed to hit. I believe that DoDMERB also requires 10/14 plates to be considered qualified/passing for CG applications.
please forgive me. I noticed a typo in my reply. He would be considered NON-aviation personnel.
 

USCG Master

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There are eyeglasses that allow colorblind people see color. Can these be used?
 
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