NROTC College Program eligibility - Medical DQ?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by A6E Dad, Jun 7, 2017.

  1. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad BGO

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    Hello,
    DS was a very strong candidate for USNA with multiple noms, but received a late turndown, and also came up short for the 4 yr scholarship.
    He is attending college this fall and is planning to join NROTC as a college programmer, and will apply again for the scholarship and USNA.

    The eligibility for the College Program includes : "Have no apparent physical disqualifying factor based on a review of your medical history found of DD Form 2807-1 "

    How does this impact someone who was DODMERB DQ, for something that is waiverable, but for which a waiver was not yet processed? As I understand it, for an NROTC scholarship recipient, the student joins the unit and participates while the waiver process works itself out. What happens with a college programmer? There is no DODMERB process until there is a scholarship, so there is no waiver process correct?
    So what happens if there are "yes" answers on the medical form, that would normally trigger a DODMEB DQ? Does that preclude a person from joining?
    Or is this requirement intended to identify "obvious" DQ's which are never going to be waived (i.e., one leg missing), but not something more minor (history of dislocated shoulder).
    Proceeding with caution because would hate to see DS prevented from even starting as a programmer.
    thanks,
     
  2. rocatlin

    rocatlin 5-Year Member

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    @NavyNOLA would probably provide the best insight.

    You may also have your son connect with the staff at the NROTC unit he plans enrolling in. Regardless of the waiver discussion, it would be best to get that process started early.
     
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  3. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad BGO

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    thanks,

    yes, he's already been engaged with the unit, and received all the forms he needs to provide - which triggered the question.
     
  4. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    College Program students complete the 2807-1 with a medical provider and then the units review. If there are no issues, they can be admitted into College Program. If issues do exist, the individual unit will have to make their own decision as to whether or not to admit the student. Many conditions are waiverable, so it depends on the exact situation. If it was, say, a shoulder surgery that had occurred years prior and there is now full functionality, I'd have little concern. If it was something like a history of anxiety disorder, mood disorder, eating disorder, color blindness, etc., I'd have significant concern. If the unit believed that the student would not be eligible for a waiver, they wouldn't have to accept them into the program. If they do accept them, they'll be a college program student until they pick up scholarship, at which point they'd then complete DODMERB. Bottom line, it's left to each individual unit/PNS to decide who they'll admit to College Program.
     
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  5. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad BGO

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    Thank you NOLA,

    If I understand you correctly, there is no BUMED review done, only a staff review by the Unit of the 2807-1 which includes notes/attestation from the students doctor? In other words, the Unit staff reviews the history and makes a judgment as to 1. whether the student is going to be able to perform as required in the program and 2. whether there is a likelihood of that student getting a waiver later?

    If that is the case, would it be advisable to include any supporting information, such as what would have been sent to DODMERB to support a waiver? Or would it be best to simply check the necessary boxes, and have the doctor state something like "fit for all physical activities without restriction" and leave it at that?

    I understand sometimes there is a danger in supplying too much info that wasn't requested

    thanks
     
  6. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    The student should simply be honest on the medical form. I'm not going to provide any further guidance.
     
  7. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad BGO

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    Sorry if I wasn't clear, the question was about who is going to review this, not about whether or not to be honest on the form.

    If the medical form isn't going to be reviewed by a doctor, then it wouldn't make sense to send a lot of supporting medical info, especially if it isn't specifically requested. So he should simply answer the questions/check the boxes and have it signed by his doctor, as instructed. If they ask for anything else, he can send it

    thanks