NROTC - Marine Option Chances?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by TexanBison1998, May 17, 2019.

  1. TexanBison1998

    TexanBison1998 Member

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    All,

    I recently resigned from the Merchant Marine Academy after realizing it wasn't what I wanted to study and didn't enjoy my time at Sea. I'm currently finishing up my Associates of Science at community college and hoping to transfer to a four year university to study applied mathematics and wanted to know about the likelihood of a three year NROTC - Marine Option Scholarship? Will PM personal details but I was slated to go to Leatherneck (USNA MIDN commissioning Marines qualification course) this summer but had to give it up when I resigned. As well any recommendations for colleges or suggestions at all would be great!
    EDIT: I know its through each school but what do they generally look for in the three year applicants and what is expected?
     
  2. Devil Doc

    Devil Doc Teufel Doc

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    Or you could do two more years at State U and commission in the Corps through OCS.

    I must ask though, if you didn't enjoy your time at sea at KP, will you enjoy hitching a ride on one of our gray hulls?
     
  3. BlueBulldog

    BlueBulldog Banned

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    I suspect you chances are not good at all - you've definitively proven your ability to quit. I suspect the route to a USMC commission might look like graduate from some school on your own dime and then try OCS or perhaps enlist in the USMC then attempt college via MECP ... I think it's going to be tough sledding from here - but interested to hear others thoughts
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
  4. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

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    I think it’s a matter of you going into the program and knocking it out of the park. There could be some who question that you had a commissioning path and left it. I don’t know you or your motivations except for what you post, so I will take them as that. I think for someone who had completed an Indoc and lived a SA lifestyle the bar will be high for when you walk into that unit. Be prepared to run a 280+ PFT, be squared away and do well academically and it can only help you. If you have your associates already and are planning to transfer to a 4 year... I think the question of timing comes in to play. Kinnem and Devil Doc can straighten me out here... but you would need to do 3 years at the university to pursue ROTC? If you are entering as a junior you would already need advanced standing or a scholarship to be on the program? You can also pursue PLC.
     
  5. Devil Doc

    Devil Doc Teufel Doc

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    I believe that is the case and is what I was getting at. One can get started with the OSO after two years of college to get the PLC path underway. There is money available (office scholarships, etc.) many times to help with tuition. That's the way I would go.
     
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  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Yeah, I have to agree with Doc on this one. I'd pursue PLC or OCC and do college on my own dime. I don't see how one can complete NROTC in 2 years, even if there was a way to get accepted. One could always talk to the unit at the college you hope to attend but don't expect too much. I think the Marine Option academic curriculum would take at least 3 years and just 2 years of leadership roles would't be enough to satisfy me. Just my 2 cents. It's always possible that an exception might be made for someone who had your background, but you would need to be on the ball every minute of your time there if it were to happen.
     
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  7. TexanBison1998

    TexanBison1998 Member

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    Thank you all for the good thoughts and advice, they are greatly appreciated! I'm doing another three years due to switching such different majors, but I'll definitely look more into PLC and OCS to take as routes, genuinely appreciated all comments!
     
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  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Three years as a Marine Option NROTC midshipman might be doable. You might have to double up on a naval science class one semester (not sure) but they might allow it. You must already be pretty familiar with customs and courtesies, and missing CORTRAMID is no big deal, especially for someone who knows they want Marines. It would be a good topic of discussion with the unit. PLC and OCS are still good options if your can't pull off the NROTC.
     
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  9. TexanBison1998

    TexanBison1998 Member

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    Funny you mentioned the Gray Hulls! I was actually on a Military Sealift Command and loved the military side of it and the actual sea time, but being a mariner itself was disappointing and not a lifestyle I would choose, but definitely appreciate those who choose to do it!
     
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  10. Devil Doc

    Devil Doc Teufel Doc

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    MSC ships are gray hills with blue and gold strips on the stack. Totally different world from merchantmen, shooters (destroyers), and riding on a gator. Three of my four ships were destroyers. I deployed on amphibious ships as embarked troops. I retired from MSC as the medical programs manager. I know about each and while it isn’t required to love life at sea, it surely helps to not hate it. The Marines are a sea service. We are meant for ships and ships are meant to go to sea.
     
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