NROTC Marine Option

JohnJr1601

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2017
Messages
68
•Does everyone who applies for the NROTC Marine option get a scholarship? If so how do you apply for the scholarship, and how many people (percent) get the scholarship?
•Do you have to apply for the Marine NROTC option? And if so, what is the acceptance rate?
•Is the Physical Fitness test for NROTC different from the Marine NROTC option?

I need all the help I can get;)
 

BBusa

Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2016
Messages
15
No. It is highly competitive. Your local recruitment office will have the information. Start going to PT with them and build a good relationship with them. The marine option is highly competitive too. I competed against 181 people and was the only one offered it. The physical test is 3 miles, pull-ups or flexed arm hang if you're a female, and sit ups. I ran a 26 min, 3 pull- ups and a 60 second flexed arm hang (to see which one would get me a better score), and 100 sit ups. Keep up the good grades and keep taking hard classes. If you're looking at the service academies, be candid about why. They will ask you which one you will accept if offered both.
 

PurplePanther

Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
51
•Does everyone who applies for the NROTC Marine option get a scholarship?
No.
If so how do you apply for the scholarship, and how many people (percent) get the scholarship?
•Do you have to apply for the Marine NROTC option? And if so, what is the acceptance rate?
Apply online here: http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/apply.html and select Marine Option. I do not know exact percentages/numbers, but it is very competitive. Do the best you can with what you can control, (ACT, PFT, GPA, Essays, ect.) and that's all you can do. Another thing that could help greatly would be to join the DEP (delayed entry program) and start attending functions at your local recruiters office.
•Is the Physical Fitness test for NROTC different from the Marine NROTC option?
Yes- NROTC Marine Option is the PFT (pull ups, crunches, 3 mile run) and you should be very close if not at the maximum score (300) to be competitive. To earn a 300, you need to do 20 pull ups, 105 crunches in 2 minutes, and run 3 miles in 18:00. (19:30 if you live somewhere 5,000+ feet above sea level) This is assuming you are a 17-20 year old male, full standards can be found here: https://www.usmcofficer.com/new-pft-pull-up-and-push-up-score-tables-2017/.

Just curious, what year are you in school?
 

gabetrini

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
64
No.

Apply online here: http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/apply.html and select Marine Option. I do not know exact percentages/numbers, but it is very competitive. Do the best you can with what you can control, (ACT, PFT, GPA, Essays, ect.) and that's all you can do. Another thing that could help greatly would be to join the DEP (delayed entry program) and start attending functions at your local recruiters office.

Yes- NROTC Marine Option is the PFT (pull ups, crunches, 3 mile run) and you should be very close if not at the maximum score (300) to be competitive. To earn a 300, you need to do 20 pull ups, 105 crunches in 2 minutes, and run 3 miles in 18:00. (19:30 if you live somewhere 5,000+ feet above sea level) This is assuming you are a 17-20 year old male, full standards can be found here: https://www.usmcofficer.com/new-pft-pull-up-and-push-up-score-tables-2017/.

Just curious, what year are you in school?

21 pull ups now for 17-20 age range*
 

USMCGrunt

10-Year Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2010
Messages
3,162
Another thing that could help greatly would be to join the DEP (delayed entry program)

I do not agree with this statement and would advise anyone interested in an officer ascension program to challenge this recommendation.

The USMC Delayed Entry Program is occasionally sold by recruiters as a way to "strengthen" an application for a NROTC scholarship. It is not. DEP (also known as the Delayed Enlistment Program) incorporates recruits into the inactive reserves and includes an agreement to report for active duty at a specific date in the future. This timeframe may be anywhere from several days up to a year. It is a legally binding contract which can only be broken by specific criteria - one of which is earning a NROTC scholarship. But if you don't get the scholarship the poolee is reporting to boot camp as an enlisted Marine.
 

JohnJr1601

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2017
Messages
68
No.

Apply online here: http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/apply.html and select Marine Option. I do not know exact percentages/numbers, but it is very competitive. Do the best you can with what you can control, (ACT, PFT, GPA, Essays, ect.) and that's all you can do. Another thing that could help greatly would be to join the DEP (delayed entry program) and start attending functions at your local recruiters office.

Yes- NROTC Marine Option is the PFT (pull ups, crunches, 3 mile run) and you should be very close if not at the maximum score (300) to be competitive. To earn a 300, you need to do 20 pull ups, 105 crunches in 2 minutes, and run 3 miles in 18:00. (19:30 if you live somewhere 5,000+ feet above sea level) This is assuming you are a 17-20 year old male, full standards can be found here: https://www.usmcofficer.com/new-pft-pull-up-and-push-up-score-tables-2017/.

Just curious, what year are you in school?
I'm a Sophmore ( in Highschool)
 

Toesha

New Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2016
Messages
9
I was awarded the Marine Option scholarship back in November. I highly recommend that you apply as early as possible (usually opens up in the summer). I got my application done before the first board met and was called the day after they met with the good news that I had it. Just like everyone else said you need to have a good GPA and be physically fit with lots of extra curricular activities. If you have a JROTC program, Civil Air Patrol, or Sea Cadets I highly recommend joining one of them. I've been in Sea Cadets since Freshmen year and will be graduating out of the program this year. Don't pad your application with a bunch of activities that you don't enjoy. Stick with whatever you like and go for it.
 

PurplePanther

Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
51
I do not agree with this statement and would advise anyone interested in an officer ascension program to challenge this recommendation.

The USMC Delayed Entry Program is occasionally sold by recruiters as a way to "strengthen" an application for a NROTC scholarship. It is not. DEP (also known as the Delayed Enlistment Program) incorporates recruits into the inactive reserves and includes an agreement to report for active duty at a specific date in the future. This timeframe may be anywhere from several days up to a year. It is a legally binding contract which can only be broken by specific criteria - one of which is earning a NROTC scholarship. But if you don't get the scholarship the poolee is reporting to boot camp as an enlisted Marine.

I did not realize the full extent of the DEP program, I am not a member of it and should have done my research!

I agree with USMCGrunt, if being a Marine is your top priority than sure, but if commissioning is then maybe it's not in your best interest. Perhaps look into Sea Cadets/CAP/JROTC instead.

Good thing is, you've got plenty of time to work towards a perfect PFT, as well as build some extracurriculars, and get a good ACT/SAT score.

Best of luck!
 
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