NROTC requirement for in-state college choice?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by chaphillmom, May 8, 2019.

  1. chaphillmom

    chaphillmom Member

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    Hello- hopeful for some quick advice. Somehow I've been operating under the belief that for NROTC, one of DS' top three school choices needs to be an in-state public university. However, as we fill the application out now I don't see that requirement, and can't find any reference to it. Have the rules changed, or did I just get confused?
     
  2. jaglvr

    jaglvr Member

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    unless things have changed, you are correct. one of the first 3 choices.

    for 2017-18, my DS had to change his choices because of that. his regional guy made him change it.
     
  3. Go Dores!

    Go Dores! Member

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    Rules change. In line with no scholarship caps at NROTC units. Win the scholarship, it will be placed at your #1 listed choice.
     
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  4. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    I was thinking the 'no limit' change might explain a change of rules on in-state schools. It doesn't seem to make sense anymore.
     
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  5. Herman_Snerd

    Herman_Snerd Member

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    Yes, last year (for those starting college next fall), it was definitely a requirement to apply t0 at-least one in-state school on your NROTC application. Sounds like that changed, which I agree makes sense given that you can now use it at your number 1 school. That's interesting and thanks for sharing.

    My brief advice- Encourage your DS to apply to all branches and consider the academies and ROTC (though in full disclosure my DS did not pursue the academies but to each her or his own) as plans B, C, D and include good in-state options in case you get an AFROTC, Type 7 scholarship award - which is awesome at in-state schools, and can be converted to a smaller scholarship (3 year type 2) at out of state schools.

    Good luck and awesome that he wants to serve.
     
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  6. chaphillmom

    chaphillmom Member

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    Thanks @Herman_Snerd . And we appreciate the advice. He will also apply to AFROTC and AROTC, as well as USNA. His primary academic interests are nuclear or aerospace engineering, so he could certainly pursue that with any of the branches. Fortunately, our in-state college has a great engineering program with both of those majors, but he also wants to take a shot at some reach/ shoot for the star engineering schools. Thanks again.
     
  7. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    Take a look at the links below since he is interested in nuclear engineering - scroll down and expand “NUPOC.” This is a highly competitive and generous college program, targeted to those who definitely want nuclear engineering duty. It is a great path for some.

    OFFICIAL -

    https://www.navy.com/what-to-expect/education-opportunities/college-options-and-scholarships


    https://www.navycs.com/officer/nupoc.html

    UNOFFICIAL
    https://www.seasoasa.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/seasoasa/NUPOC-Program_UCLA.pdf

    https://nupocaccessions.blogspot.com/?m=1
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
  8. chaphillmom

    chaphillmom Member

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    Thanks for the links @Capt MJ . NUPOC is definitely on his radar. At the moment (and it all could change at any moment!) I think his preference is ROTC at a dream school (i.e. MIT or Georgia Tech), followed by USNA, followed by state university with NUPOC, followed by schools that offer automatic merit (Alabama @ Huntsville for example). He is going to USNA Summer Seminar, so my hope is he gets a chance to see a slice of life in the military and ensure it is the right choice for him. I recognize that it won't be exactly the same conditions. We will see if that experience shakes up his priorities at all. I'm really glad that he is getting started on this journey fairly early so that he has time to investigate and make course corrections as needed.
     
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  9. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    If he decides USNA is for him, and he gets in, he doesn’t have to let go of his dream schools. A handful of top-performing USNA grads are allowed to go direct to grad school, on the Navy’s dime, of course. I know several who have gotten their Master’s in the Engineering curriculum at MIT, Ga Tech, and other top schools. Then they go to their warfare specialty. Those opportunities are also available later on after operational tours during a shore rotation.

    Be sure to look at the hamburger menu in the upper left of this link:

    https://www.usna.edu/GraduateEducation/index.php
     
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  10. 5centsmom

    5centsmom Member

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    Here’s a plug for U Wisconsin Madison’s nuclear engineering program. I’ve seen it ranked #2, behind MIT. The NROTC unit is really terrific. DS has had a truly awesome year here. The weather isn’t much better than Boston’s but imho the town is.

    DS has received advice from retired submariners time & again that this major can actually impede his nuclear power school education (post-undergrad). So he’s keeping that in mind as he proceeds through the first levels of engineering classes and could potentially switch if he falls in love with mechanical, chemical or electrical instead.

    In full disclosure he was TWE applying to USNA from HS and is waitlisted this year (and would go with a minute’s notice). But he likes where he is, thinks the school and NROTC are the best, so is in a good place. He didn’t consider transferring to another school/unit for a nano-second, and thinks highly of the unit leadership and other members.

    Good luck as you research/begin the journey!
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2019
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  11. chaphillmom

    chaphillmom Member

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    @5centsmom - UW Wisconsin is on his list! Out of curiosity, why would the nuclear engineering degree impede his nuclear power school education? I would have thought it was complimentary,
     
  12. 5centsmom

    5centsmom Member

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    My (limited) understanding is that a nuclear engineer studies theory, design etc. Nuke power school is about operations. Chemical, electrical and mechanical engineers are highly sought for this reason. Several Old Timers even said that in Rickover’s time he regularly tossed N.E.s out on their ear.

    Hopefully someone more knowledgeable will state the reasons better than I, but think of it this way: the need is for someone to operate and monitor, not redesign the reactor while underway. Several Nuke Power school grads (surface and sub) told son the N.E. Majors were struggling constantly to fit what they were being taught at Nuke Power school with what they learned as an undergrad.

    As you may already realize, there are very few schools in this country which offer an undergraduate major in N.E. More graduate level programs are available.
     
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