Opinions on current economical climate

Tex232

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Nov 24, 2015
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I was just curious to see what some of you folks think about the current situation with the economy & job market.

Do you think the high unemployment numbers, stagnant stock market, etc. are only temporary and will end or at least ease once we start see the economy re-opening, or do you think this all part of a larger trend? How long do you think this will last, one year, two, 10? Do you think this will be worse than 08', not as bad? Also, for those of you that have served in the military in the past, what are your thoughts on the possibilities of a RIF in the near future?
 

justdoit19

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Apr 9, 2017
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I just said to my Mid, that I’ve not felt more thankful that he has a guaranteed job upon graduation than presently. I had a bunch of nieces, nephews, kids of friends graduate college this weekend (virtually of course)....ALL without jobs. Moving home if they aren’t there already.

Very sad times.
 

A1Janitor

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Dec 22, 2018
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I suspect it will be bad for awhile. The outlook in upstate NY is bad.

My nephew and daughter who just graduated college will go on for advanced degrees.
 

Jarhead713

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Mar 21, 2019
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When economists usually view the economy, full employment is considered as 4-6% unemployment. That's the consensus for judging things like GDP.

(Full employment is impossible, due to structural, frictional and cyclical circumstances)

I believe right now the unemployment rate is 14.7%... not good.

I think that's gonna take a long time to recover from. Especially since states aren't following the reopening guidelines correctly. (Some people/businesses may opt to not work in favor of safety, there may be a resurgence, etc.) Since there's no real set date, there's not really a way to just flip a switch, unfortunately.

If you want to see something scary, look at this. V


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Chockstock

"Forever One Team"
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I'm confident 3-4 years from now itll all just become a bad memory/source of endless jokes (it already is). Although many are suffering...economies will recover and humanity will return to marching towards 4,000 on the S&P500. In the grand scheme of things, I dont think life will alter significantly. Imagine 10 years from now...no one will remember or care.

And in a hundred years, even national tragedies become a gigantic joke

1589527774862.png
 

THParent

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I saw an inflatable Titanic slide like that at a State fair once. I couldn't believe the monumental bad taste anyone would have in even dreaming something like that up, much less thinking that producing it was in any way a good idea.
 

AF6872

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Like 10/14 1066, 10/25 1415, 1588, 4/15 1912 and 6/6 1944 they will all slip into the mist only remembered in books if they still have them. THIS TOO SHALL PASS.
 
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billyb

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Jun 17, 2010
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I don't think many pilots will be leaving AD to go to the airlines in the near future. That ship has sailed for many years to come I would think.
 

OldRetSWO

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Like 10/14 1066, 10/25 1415, 1588, 4/15 1912 and 6/6 1944 they will all slip into the mist only remembered in books if they still have them.
I sort of agree and about a week ago, I decided to start a photo essay/collection that I've titled "Life in the time of COVID". Since we live in a very locked down area close to the center of the pandemic within the US, there are constant reminders all over the place. The giant parking lots at the train station that normally have many hundreds of cars for commuters to NYC have maybe 5 cars on a weekday. The absolutely empty lots at a stripmall. The closed sections of the supermarket. The floor markings outside the supermarket that denote where to stand when lining up to get into the store. Cars lining up for a "Wave Parade" to celebrate a birthday when there are no parties allowed. The "new socializing" on Zoom.
I have started putting them in an album that I have on Facebook with proper captions/descriptions and my wife has added some as well.

I just want to memorialize how this affected everyday life for my grandchildren and so on.
 

StPaulDad

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Feb 24, 2017
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That's kind of like the "someday you'll think things were always this way but as of today this is really unusual" thing James Fallows started over at The Atlantic back in 2016 when Trump started changed how elections and politics looked. I think he calls them time capsules, and they are a surveyors' stake in history so that if anyone starts thinking "why would you buy paper products at a grocery store?" you can say "There were long stretches of empty shelves where the TP used to be."
 

cb7893

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I think he calls them time capsules, and they are a surveyors' stake in history so that if anyone starts thinking "why would you buy paper products at a grocery store?" you can say "There were long stretches of empty shelves where the TP used to be."
"And newspapers and telephone books had been replaced by I Pads."

I'm allowed say that, because I was born and raised in Tennessee.:biggrin:
 

Tex232

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Nov 24, 2015
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I don't think many pilots will be leaving AD to go to the airlines in the near future. That ship has sailed for many years to come I would think.
I think it depends on the recovery (or lack thereof). Also, some may still leave and just find jobs other than aviation. One of the reasons the Air Force cited for losing pilots was quality of life issues, not pay.
 
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