Prosecutors Who Lost Gallagher Case Receive Awards for 'Superb Results'

Wishful

"Land of the free, because of the brave..."
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https://taskandpurpose.com/gallagher-prosecutors-awards

And you get a prize... & you get a prize...& the judge who presided over the case attended the ceremony?? Why would he ever do that?o_O
Capt. Aaron Rugh is also scheduled to preside over a related failure-to-report-war-crimes case (Portier) in September. Looks like the defense has something "to throw against the wall & see if it sticks" with this. Maybe he'll have to recuse; we'll see.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your...-legal-bombshells-explode-in-war-crimes-case/
 

NJROTC-CC

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I don't know too much about the case, except that it seemed like the prosecution blew by granting immunity to a witness who flipped and testified against the prosecution's case. I don't know, couldn't they have granted conditional immunity?
 

Jcleppe

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So I'm curious, this first statement implies that if he was given any confinement, even time served, he would be reduced in rank to E-1 and would retire as E-1.

"Navy official told Task & Purpose that with any sentence involving confinement, the rules for court-martial require an automatic reduction in rank to E-1. Essentially, the official said, if the jury decides to sentence Gallagher to any brig time, even if it's time served, he'll be retiring as an E-1 instead of an E-7."

So....Why does it now seem that his reduction in rank was just one step down to E-6?

"Cleared of the most serious charges on July 3, the chief was found guilty on the single photo charge, which got him a sentence of four months' confinement and reduction in rank to E-6."

All of this is probably moot since the President has floated that he may pardon him. Next up, a lucrative book deal, the Seal Code of Publication.
 

Jcleppe

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An update to the original post.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your...xes-nams-for-4-prosecutors-tied-to-seal-case/

So this is what we have come to....

Calling it “absolutely service discrediting for the Navy to have POTUS strip their awards,” Sullivan urged unnamed JAG officials to "tender their resignations before their names appear in a tweet.”

“What is the Navy waiting for to dismiss the Portier case?" Sullivan said on Wednesday. “Do they really need a tweet?”


Live or die by Tweets
 
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cb7893

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Sorry I didn't see this post before making my own on another thread.
 

cb7893

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So I'm curious, this first statement implies that if he was given any confinement, even time served, he would be reduced in rank to E-1 and would retire as E-1.

"Navy official told Task & Purpose that with any sentence involving confinement, the rules for court-martial require an automatic reduction in rank to E-1. Essentially, the official said, if the jury decides to sentence Gallagher to any brig time, even if it's time served, he'll be retiring as an E-1 instead of an E-7."

So....Why does it now seem that his reduction in rank was just one step down to E-6?

"Cleared of the most serious charges on July 3, the chief was found guilty on the single photo charge, which got him a sentence of four months' confinement and reduction in rank to E-6."

All of this is probably moot since the President has floated that he may pardon him. Next up, a lucrative book deal, the Seal Code of Publication.
From my gut to your keyboard.
 

Old Navy BGO

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I don't know how to post links..but you can Google it. CNO has stepped in, and ordered an investigation/review of JAG, dropped charges against the officer in charge of Chief Gallagher's Team. This whole case has been a goat rope, and the **REMOVED** is hitting the fan.
 
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cb7893

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I don't know how to post links..but you can Google it. CNO has stepped in, and ordered an investigation/review of JAG, dropped charges against the officer in charge of Chief Gallagher's Team. This whole case has been a goat rope, and the sh!t is hitting the fan.
Copy the address and paste it to the post. That's about all I know.

https://taskandpurpose.com/portier-charges-dropped

"[LT] Portier, who joined the Navy in 2010 and had been serving as a SEAL officer since 2012, had been charged with obstruction and other related charges for allegedly failing to report to his superiors on Gallagher, his platoon chief who had been accused of war crimes during a deployment to Iraq in 2017."

Don't be too harsh. He was only charged with destroying evidence.

What I want to know is how a person joins the Navy and less than three years later (at most) becomes a SEAL officer. Please tell me the reporter isn't leaving out time at USNA or at least NROTC.

My DS had to serve almost three years as an Army officer before even requesting a spot in SFAS. Then another 1+ year qualification course. Then add RASP to that.
 

NJROTC-CC

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Copy the address and paste it to the post. That's about all I know.

https://taskandpurpose.com/portier-charges-dropped

"[LT] Portier, who joined the Navy in 2010 and had been serving as a SEAL officer since 2012, had been charged with obstruction and other related charges for allegedly failing to report to his superiors on Gallagher, his platoon chief who had been accused of war crimes during a deployment to Iraq in 2017."

Don't be too harsh. He was only charged with destroying evidence.

What I want to know is how a person joins the Navy and less than three years later (at most) becomes a SEAL officer. Please tell me the reporter isn't leaving out time at USNA or at least NROTC.

My DS had to serve almost three years as an Army officer before even requesting a spot in SFAS. Then another 1+ year qualification course. Then add RASP to that.
I believe that Lt. Portier went through NROTC at Ohio State
 

Jcleppe

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What I want to know is how a person joins the Navy and less than three years later (at most) becomes a SEAL officer. Please tell me the reporter isn't leaving out time at USNA or at least NROTC.
I would imagine that they are referring to when Lt. Portier entered active duty.

The Navy is different then the Army when it comes to Officers and the Seals, I know that every year a small number of USNA grads are selected to go to BUDS right after graduation, not sure about those that go through NROTC or OCS.

The Army requires officers to be 1LT(P) before they can apply to SOF.
 

Old Navy BGO

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What I want to know is how a person joins the Navy and less than three years later (at most) becomes a SEAL officer. Please tell me the reporter isn't leaving out time at USNA or at least NROTC.
The Navy is different then the Army when it comes to Officers and the Seals, I know that every year a small number of USNA grads are selected to go to BUDS right after graduation, not sure about those that go through NROTC or OCS.
Correct, Ensigns can go directly through BUDS/SEAL. I'm no expert, but I think the training pipeline is roughly two years before they earn their Trident.
 

emwvmi01

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I don't know how to post links..but you can Google it. CNO has stepped in, and ordered an investigation/review of JAG, dropped charges against the officer in charge of Chief Gallagher's Team. This whole case has been a goat rope, and the sh!t is hitting the fan.
Copy the address and paste it to the post. That's about all I know.

https://taskandpurpose.com/portier-charges-dropped

"[LT] Portier, who joined the Navy in 2010 and had been serving as a SEAL officer since 2012, had been charged with obstruction and other related charges for allegedly failing to report to his superiors on Gallagher, his platoon chief who had been accused of war crimes during a deployment to Iraq in 2017."

Don't be too harsh. He was only charged with destroying evidence.

What I want to know is how a person joins the Navy and less than three years later (at most) becomes a SEAL officer. Please tell me the reporter isn't leaving out time at USNA or at least NROTC.

My DS had to serve almost three years as an Army officer before even requesting a spot in SFAS. Then another 1+ year qualification course. Then add RASP to that.

Pretty simple, different services have different accessions paths. Army Special Forces is selective after serving in a basic branch and making the list for Captain.

Navy has direct entry from commissioning for special warfare.

A lot of reasons why but the role of an ODA has some significant differences than leading a SEAL platoon.

Finally convening authority was probably seeing a difficult path to conviction given alleged acts the lieutenant didn’t report were acquitted and fairly substantial evidence of prosecutorial misconduct
 

Capt MJ

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Ditto NROTC, SEAL is a choice, highly competitive, of course. OCS, they usually know they are going SEAL before they reported in. I had a few OCS classmates who were prior enlisted SEALs, got their college degree, applied for OCS, made the transition to SEAL officer. Naturally the most powerful swimmers in the class.
 

conrack

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well if you ever needed an example of how the military hands out medals like party favors...….
 

cb7893

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I think Adm McRaven went from NROTC at UT Austin to SEAL training
As far as I'm concerned, the minute one is one the hook for the scholarship, he/she has joined the service that will demand repayment if the obligation isn't met.

As I suggested might be the case, the writer wasn't clear. I understand that various SOF have different mission sets and different training pipelines. The timeline from "joining the Navy to becoming a SEAL officer" in less than three years seemed a little short, given the nature of their work.
 

Soldiergriz

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well if you ever needed an example of how the military hands out medals like party favors...….
While this may be true for commendation medals, it is certainly not true for valor awards. During the past 18 years of combat, we have significantly under- recognized acts of heroism among the total force...trust me, there are far more "heroes" among us than are recognized as such. It's just the nature of the times right now...many reviews ongoing to elevate awards...and many of them are deserved.
 

kp2001

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well if you ever needed an example of how the military hands out medals like party favors...….
Party favor awards (not talking valor): Air Force >>>>> Army > Navy >>>> Marine Corps
 

SMP

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What I want to know is how a person joins the Navy and less than three years later (at most) becomes a SEAL officer. Please tell me the reporter isn't leaving out time at USNA or at least NROTC.
I would imagine that they are referring to when Lt. Portier entered active duty.

The Navy is different then the Army when it comes to Officers and the Seals, I know that every year a small number of USNA grads are selected to go to BUDS right after graduation, not sure about those that go through NROTC or OCS.

The Army requires officers to be 1LT(P) before they can apply to SOF.
And on rare occasions, a WP cadet can cross commission to Navy and go to BUDS right after graduation as was the case with a cadet out of the 2017 graduating class.
 
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