THC Vape

GoNavy27!

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Dec 27, 2022
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I have an appointment. I experimented with a THC vape twice early in highschool and did not mention it on my DoDMERB since these vapes were sold in gas stations, so I wasn't sure if it was an "illegal drug." I should've just mentioned it but it's too late now. Obviously at Navy I am going to be completely honest on all the questionaries and stuff. Is this something I need to go back to amend? Are they going to ask me on IDay and check it with my DoDMERB? I want to be completely honest the entire time but I'm not sure if this is something I need to mention now, or just be clear about after I get there.

Thanks,
GoNavy27!
 
Make sure you understand the difference between Cannibidoil/CBD and Cannabis/marijuana. There are significant differences in the regulatgory status of the two substances. (I am not going into the details ....it is a very complicated and nuanced subject areas, and I will say that much of what you see /read online is oversimplified and wrong).

I am not advocating for the use of either, and you have to answer the question presented in any situation truthfully, but if you bought it at the gas station, it was more likely CBD than Cannabis/THC,.
 
There is a medical station during I Day where you will discuss your records. I don't remember anything being adversarial. It was a review of meds and they asked if anything had changed on my record. In my personal opinion, if it was an oversight/misunderstanding, then I think that is fine. You're a teenager and most people learn their lessons via experiential learning. You do not come across as someone trying to conceal illicit drug use. You simply experimented with something you thought was legal. Another option is to call Admissions and they can point you in the right direction. I'd try and talk to a doc over an Admissions Officer though. You have privileged communications with a doctor and they are more intimately familiar with medical standards.

I personally think you won't get caught up in anything. I had a friend admit to experimentation as a mid (did it in high school) and he is kicking butt in flight school.

I'd like to wrap this up with some career advice. This stuff won't go away. What do I mean? Throughout your time in the military (and other select occupations), there will be substances that the civilian population can take, but you can't. A good recent example is CBD. It seems everyone under the sun is using whether it is an edible, lotion, dog treat, etc. It is marketed everywhere. Military personnel cannot have it. The military doesn't take ignorance of the rules for an excuse. For some jobs (like pilot), there is even stuff at the exchange you cannot take or must consult a flight doc first before taking since it could affect human performance in flight. A good example is decongestants. Not only does it imply you cannot adequately clear your ears to accommodate pressure changes (it's a whole other issue if your sinuses burst), but the decongestants can make you drowsy.

I wish you much success during your four year journey by the Severn! USNA is a special place and the military is a career like no other. Congratulations!
 
There is a medical station during I Day where you will discuss your records. I don't remember anything being adversarial. It was a review of meds and they asked if anything had changed on my record. In my personal opinion, if it was an oversight/misunderstanding, then I think that is fine. You're a teenager and most people learn their lessons via experiential learning. You do not come across as someone trying to conceal illicit drug use. You simply experimented with something you thought was legal. Another option is to call Admissions and they can point you in the right direction. I'd try and talk to a doc over an Admissions Officer though. You have privileged communications with a doctor and they are more intimately familiar with medical standards.

I personally think you won't get caught up in anything. I had a friend admit to experimentation as a mid (did it in high school) and he is kicking butt in flight school.

I'd like to wrap this up with some career advice. This stuff won't go away. What do I mean? Throughout your time in the military (and other select occupations), there will be substances that the civilian population can take, but you can't. A good recent example is CBD. It seems everyone under the sun is using whether it is an edible, lotion, dog treat, etc. It is marketed everywhere. Military personnel cannot have it. The military doesn't take ignorance of the rules for an excuse. For some jobs (like pilot), there is even stuff at the exchange you cannot take or must consult a flight doc first before taking since it could affect human performance in flight. A good example is decongestants. Not only does it imply you cannot adequately clear your ears to accommodate pressure changes (it's a whole other issue if your sinuses burst), but the decongestants can make you drowsy.

I wish you much success during your four year journey by the Severn! USNA is a special place and the military is a career like no other. Congratulations!
So would you recommend I not say anything until I Day and then tell the doctor there? Or do not say anything at all and just fill out every form I am given correctly? Above all else I want to be truthful and honest, I am just not sure who I am supposed to tell/when
 
So would you recommend I not say anything until I Day and then tell the doctor there? Or do not say anything at all and just fill out every form I am given correctly? Above all else I want to be truthful and honest, I am just not sure who I am supposed to tell/when
If it was me personally, I'd call Admissions, identify myself as an appointee, and ask to speak with one of the docs about a records question. If you do this, they will either transfer you or give you the right number. Tell the doc you made an error and accidentally omitted something and then make the correction with them. It could be as simple as a "thanks for letting us know" or it could require some review. It is best to get that knocked out before showing up to I-Day. If you are medically questionable come I-Day, you won't be let in. There is no medical hold. If you get past I-Day, there could be a weird record thing later on where you answer truthfully that you experimented with drugs and then they go back to your record and see you answered in the negative or it was never mentioned.

People tend to be more forgiving if you bring them issues pre-emptively instead of waiting for them to find out about it. My guess is that it will be a non-issue, but I do not have the requisite experience nor authority to give a solid answer. The DODMERB standard appears that it mainly cares about substance-abuse disorders and regular usage. I don't think two times and never doing it again counts. Again, that is my personal opinion, but I am not one of the fine professionals in Navy Medicine or at DoDMERB.
 
If it was me personally, I'd call Admissions, identify myself as an appointee, and ask to speak with one of the docs about a records question. If you do this, they will either transfer you or give you the right number. Tell the doc you made an error and accidentally omitted something and then make the correction with them. It could be as simple as a "thanks for letting us know" or it could require some review. It is best to get that knocked out before showing up to I-Day. If you are medically questionable come I-Day, you won't be let in. There is no medical hold. If you get past I-Day, there could be a weird record thing later on where you answer truthfully that you experimented with drugs and then they go back to your record and see you answered in the negative or it was never mentioned.

People tend to be more forgiving if you bring them issues pre-emptively instead of waiting for them to find out about it. My guess is that it will be a non-issue, but I do not have the requisite experience nor authority to give a solid answer. The DODMERB standard appears that it mainly cares about substance-abuse disorders and regular usage. I don't think two times and never doing it again counts. Again, that is my personal opinion, but I am not one of the fine professionals in Navy Medicine or at DoDMERB.
Understood, thank you for the advice I really appreciate it. I will call admissions asap.
 
Old thread…..
Anyhow, not sure about “buying it at a gas station “ would be considered anything to report as explained by OP. However, can they sell the federally illegal cannibas at gas stations in states like Colorado?
Seems like a once or twice underage drinking type of thing that would not flag at DODMERB if it were reported.
It’s always encouraged on SAF to report things and not withhold when asked. It’s also been suggested to not “self diagnose “ when it comes to a specific medical condition

So ultimately candidates should fully understand what is being asked so they can answer truthfully. Always.
 
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