To Recruits and Prospects

kp13

10-Year Member
5-Year Member
After the events at the Academy these past few weeks, and my pending graduation in 53 day, I feel compelled to write this to the prospects of the Academy and their parents.

Do not worry about the “state of the Academy” as it is today, and certainly do not let these events taint your image of the Academy or sway your decision on coming.

I entered the Academy in the summer of 2009 with the Academy under the “leadership” of Rear Admiral Worley. During that Indoc, we ran around in white t-shirts because there was no money to buy our PT shirts, but the Admiral promised that we would be “his class”. He left before a single member of 2013 had obtained one sea day. Since the sudden departure of Rear Admiral Worley, we have had four addition changes in the position of Superintendent, three different Commandants, and two Regimental Officers. The appointment of Rear Admiral Greene and then sudden and quite unfortunate relieving of his command was again another low point for KP during my tenure. Currently, I would say the general attitude of my class, and what has been the focal point of most of the issues lately, is that the leadership does not understand the industry or what KP is truly about. For instance, the bell ringing ceremony has become quite a point of contention in my class. This is because many feel being told to form up and be congratulated by someone who is not a Kings Pointer and has not achieved the position of 3rd mate/ engineer himself is a slap in the face.

But yet, as of this week the class of 2013 is 203 Midshipman strong. 203 Midshipman motivated to succeed in license in 33 days. We are motivated to move on in our success as 3rd mates, 3rd Assistant Engineers, Ensigns, and 2nd Lieutenants. We have been through a lot together, a death of one of our own, Midn. Marisa Sanchez, the death of our former RTOA 2nd LT. Scott Heilman, USMC, inconsistency in leadership, and of course the daily grind of the Academy. But all of this made us stronger both as we bond and as individuals. I personally have had experiences far above and beyond my counterparts at any other school in the country. I’ve been to the Middle East, the Far East, and the Caribbean during my sea year and I have made friends that will surely last a lifetime. If I had the chance to do it all over again there is no doubt in my mind that I would and I would recommend this place to anyone.

The Academy is in a rough patch right now, but the Academy isn’t defined by those appointed to leadership positions at this school. The Admiral isn’t at the Helm of this ship when it comes to the legacy and the spirit of the school. The Midshipman past and present are what make this place what it is. Ultimately, the leadership of the school will not change who Kings Pointers are at heart and what this place is about. We will persevere, as we always have since World War II, and become the best mariners we can be. After all, this Academy has never had an easy year since its creation and yet it still survives and succeeds, stately strife-born Alma Mater indeed.
 

Maplerock

Proud to be an American
5-Year Member
KP13... Those are the words of a leader. Your insight is encouraging and uplifting. Your message is indicative of someone with a compassionate, yet strong outlook. By the way... what will you do after graduation? Navy, Marines? I have a hunch you'd be a fine officer.

If one of those emoticons on this page was saluting, I'd give you one.
 

ConcernedAlumni

5-Year Member
SPOT ON!!

Well put and well written kp13!!!

Now go back to studying, or helping your classmates study, or doing anything (else) resembling staying focused on the prize.

We look forward to welcoming you into the ranks of alumni.
:smile:
 
KP13

Thank you for your well chosen words. This is KP!!!! This is what matters...the Midshipman. My DD went through all of the changes also (Class Of 2011).

:thumb:

Alumni....I would like to see this post on your sight.

:shake:

A very concerned parent and supporter of the USMMA

:unhappy:
 

h20costable

H2OCoNstable
5-Year Member
Well said & well done representing your class! Now finish strong, pass license, ring a bell, get your tube! Go 2013! See you in June......:thumb:
 

donar

10-Year Member
5-Year Member
Attrition

What KP13 failed to state is that when 2013 reported 1n 2009 the class numbered 291 .... down to 203 at graduation.... 30% attrition. That's a sad state of affairs.
 

tankercaptain

5-Year Member
What KP13 failed to state is that when 2013 reported 1n 2009 the class numbered 291 .... down to 203 at graduation.... 30% attrition. That's a sad state of affairs.
Are you trying to create controversy?
Because my original class started out with 286 and graduated 151
 

kp13

10-Year Member
5-Year Member
What KP13 failed to state is that when 2013 reported 1n 2009 the class numbered 291 .... down to 203 at graduation.... 30% attrition. That's a sad state of affairs.
This tells me the system is working, not a sad state of affairs. While it may seem cold or heartless, and believe me I have lost plenty of friends, it is the truth. Not everyone is meant to or able to stand Navigation watch on the bridge, or duty engineer in the engine room. This attrition rate saves lives, the environment, and maritime companies. This is a business with grave consequences, not a system of entitlement.
 

Lynpar

5-Year Member
Say kp13,
I hear there is a job opening at DOT that doesn't require prior experience. You have my confirmation vote. :rolleyes:
 

cmakin

5-Year Member
This tells me the system is working, not a sad state of affairs. While it may seem cold or heartless, and believe me I have lost plenty of friends, it is the truth. Not everyone is meant to or able to stand Navigation watch on the bridge, or duty engineer in the engine room. This attrition rate saves lives, the environment, and maritime companies. This is a business with grave consequences, not a system of entitlement.
KP has always had a pretty high attrition rate, historically. This has been addressed in other threads. It IS a tough program, even without the Regiment. Four years of classes squeezed into three years; and the realization that there are great personal and social sacrifices that must be made for a career at sea. . . .
 

AMF

5-Year Member
What KP13 failed to state is that when 2013 reported 1n 2009 the class numbered 291 .... down to 203 at graduation.... 30% attrition. That's a sad state of affairs.
30% is actually slightly lower than the 33-35% quoted as the average attrition rate. To maintain your focus, discipline, and perspective all 4 years, while passing the academics and sacrificing "normal college" time off, is not something all can do. Throw in the other personal sacrifices, and it's that much tougher. I tip my hat to those who have done it, and those who are doing it now.

p.s. this is why companies come looking for these grads!
 

baxted

10-Year Member
5-Year Member
Attrition Rate

What KP13 failed to state is that when 2013 reported 1n 2009 the class numbered 291 .... down to 203 at graduation.... 30% attrition. That's a sad state of affairs.
My engineering class started at 152, 51 of us graduated by design. Grade on a bell curve and demand a 2.5 GPA and you lose 2/3 of your students in 3 semesters. It wasn't very nice but it found the people with strong study skills. However, to be fair, I went to a large university and there were other places for those students to go.

I teach Mechanical Technology at a community college and we lose 35-40%! It sort of works that way. As has been posted above, this isn't everyone's cup of tea.
 
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