Fotouman

Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2018
Messages
26
Currently, I have an LOA to USAFA, pending nomination and medical qualification. My problem is that I've been DQ'd for shoulder dislocation that happened last month. :(
I have scheduled a surgery for around the end of December. After surgery, I will have to do rehab and physical therapy to build up my strength and stability. Doctors have said that I could probably get cleared for activity about 6 months after surgery. That would put me ready right around May or July, exactly the time when I would need to start BCT. I know it's a long shot, but is there any chance I could make this work this year? The other problem is that this would give me basically no time to get a waiver. I might be able to get the doctor to send a note to USAFA telling them when I will be cleared before I actually am cleared? Has anyone ever started BCT while still pending a waiver? I have been working with USAFA waiver administrators but they cannot give me any medical advice for legal reasons. I know I can always reapply next year, but I am really hoping to find a way in this year. Thank you for the help, I couldn't find any other posts similar to my particular situation.
 

Impulsive

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Joined
Feb 4, 2019
Messages
673
I will preface this by saying I am not a doc, nor am I associated with any waiver academy or admissions office. That being said, I do not think a "letter" from the doc anticipating you being OK will cut it. And if you review DoDINST 6301.03 you can likely determine the time frame needed to even be considered for a waiver and how long after the surgery you need to wait. Not being a doc, I question the need for surgery for a simple dislocation? I have seen friends dislocate their shoulder, get it "popped" back in and after a week of physical therapy are good to go. Surgery sounds like maybe there is some underlying issue (either tissue or compartment related) that the doc is concerned about.

On the good side, if you have an LOA, the Academy wants you, and having to do a year of college is not the end of the world to realize your dream. Good Luck, hopefully miracles happen in your case..:)
 
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Fotouman

Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2018
Messages
26
I will preface this by saying I am not a doc, nor am I associated with any waiver academy or admissions office. That being said, I do not think a "letter" from the doc anticipating you being OK will cut it. And if you review DoDINST 6301.03 you can likely determine the time frame needed to even be considered for a waiver and how long after the surgery you need to wait. Not being a doc, I question the need for surgery for a simple dislocation? I have seen friends dislocate their shoulder, get it "popped" back in and after a week of physical therapy are good to go. Surgery sounds like maybe there is some underlying issue (either tissue or compartment related) that the doc is concerned about.

On the good side, if you have an LOA, the Academy wants you, and having to do a year of college is not the end of the world to realize your dream. Good Luck, hopefully miracles happen in your case..:)
Sorry, I should have been more clear. When I dislocated my shoulder I also tore the labrum. Without surgery, the labrum never heals and it would be likely to dislocate again. The waiver officials have requested that I send all imaging (MRI, X-Ray, etc.), treatment notes (surgery report, etc.), and a "Full release to activities" note from my doctor. Obviously, I can send the first two pretty soon after I have surgery. All I am really waiting on is the "release to activities" note from the doctor. Thus, I do not need only a letter from the Doc, but it is probably the most important factor for my waiver. I have reviewed DoDINST 6301.03. It seems to mainly have information about disqualifying conditions (I have already been disqualified), but not as much about waivers. Luckily, I will have more time to work on a waiver for ROTC because they do not have Summer training. Thank you for your help.
 

Impulsive

Member
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Feb 4, 2019
Messages
673
Waivers are unto themselves difficult to evaluate. Since each and every appointing source controls their own waivers, no one can possibly know if or when a particular waiver will be granted. Every waiver is unique, the waiver authority and admissions evaluates the candidate, the needs of the service, the makeup of that Class, and the potential problems with the original issue resurfacing or causing problems. Usually 6301.03 will indicate a time frame for problems, but you are correct that it does not control waivers, there are strictly the prevue of the appointing source.

Just a guess, and there are docs on here that can answer much more definitively as to if you have any shot at this year, but if you have the surgery in early December and are not "cleared until June" that is really cutting it close and you are likely asking for a miracle. But miracles do happen and if the academy wants you bad enough members here have indicated in other threads that they have received waivers in less than a month.
 

Fotouman

Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2018
Messages
26
I have had my shoulder surgery and the doctor said it went well. However, it will still take me several months to do physical therapy and be released to activities. I will, of course, submit my documents as soon as I can, but I still have doubts that I will be able to make it in time. I'm wondering if I should just devote my efforts to ROTC, at least for this year.
 

okboomer

DS 2024 USMA
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Messages
422
Work both paths. What’s the worst thing that could happen? You dint get the waiver in time and have to go Plan B and adjust? Don’t ever give up your dream!
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
23
This is MullenLE, Deputy Chief DoDMERB - My MullenLE countable has problems right now.

FOTOUMAN - I do NOT speak for the USAFA waiver authority, which has recently changed to the AFRS waiver authority for USAFA applicants (1 Dec). No one gets admitted pending a medical waiver. They would NOT accept a note on when you “will” be cleared, because your Doc doesn’t know. He/she bases 6 mos on a range of his/her patients. But everyone is different. If you have the opportunity and the timing is much better for ROTC, you should focus there. You can always reapply. That’s the realistic unfrilled answer.
 
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