Which District or Both?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Dadx4, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Dadx4

    Dadx4 Member

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    If I own a second piece of real estate in a different district within my state, can my kid apply from either district even though they primarily reside in one of them? I'm considering moving my job to a different part of the state that is too far for me commute (so I will buy a small home there and come home on weekends), but my kid will stay in their present location and school. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    You should apply for nomination from home of legal residence. What constitutes "legal residence" may vary from state to state, but essentially where you spend most of your time, where you vote, where you register your car, etc. I would caution against trying to straddle the fence and trying to claim both states or districts within a state for nomination purposes -- Senators and Congressman often coordinate their nominations, and I would expect USNA to look askance at a candidate and raise questions about someone with nominations from two Congressional Districts within the same state.
     
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  3. shock-n-awe

    shock-n-awe Member

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    Can't do both.
    You have only one legal residence and your congressional district will match that. Check local laws defining residency requirements and follow that. If your kid is residing in current location and attending that school, I would believe that to answer the residency question, at least for the kid.
    One never knows what district will produce a stronger candidate even though one district may be considered "less competitive ".
     
  4. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    A dependent child’s residency is the same as where his/her parents is/are legal residents. Each person has one district of legal residence. It is, as Old Navy said, where you live, vote, register your car, etc. If two parents who share legal ( not necessarily physical) custody of the child live in different states or districts, the candidate can choose to apply from either state/district for each SA. Not both. This determination is regardless of where the child lives or goes to school.

    For example, assume one parent is military and the other not. The military parent is a legal resident of Florida. The non- military parent is a legal resident of Georgia. The family lives in Georgia. Child could apply from Florida or Georgia. This also can happen with divorced parents who live in different places. Conversely, if a kid attends boarding school in a different state/district from where the family lives, the child is not considered a resident of that (school) district because neither parent resides there.

    If the OP establishes residence in a different district than where the family/ other parent lives, your child could apply from either district. However, You must meet the legal requirements to be a resident of that district. And agree with Old Navy that I’d the other “district” is near the old one, it could look bad. IOW, there ‘s a difference in perception between districts that are 300 miles away and those that are 3 miles away.

    Also, just because it’s easier to get a nom from a district doesn’t necessarily mean it’s easier to get an appointment. But that’s for another day.

    If you have specific questions, contact the Nominations office in Admissions.
     
  5. time2

    time2 10-Year Member

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    Variations of this topic tends to come up every so often. Bottom line is where the parents have their legal residence (i.e. think federal tax, vote, etc.) is what matters for the vast majority of applicants as mentioned above and that is where you apply for the NOM. Owning homes in multiple state/locations also does not change the fact you have a single 'legal residence'. In rare cases, someone might have divorced parents with joint custody who live in different states, but even then you can't apply for both NOM's. You can't pick & choose where to apply for a NOM just because you think one area is an 'easier' place to get a NOM.

    If you have a very unusual circumstances, USNA admissions can provide the best advice.
     
  6. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    The legal answer is that you can get a nomination from any member of congress willing to give you a nomination. There are no laws or restrictions prohibiting a member of congress from giving a nomination to a candidate not legally a resident of their district. It happens every year at SA's for candidates with exceptional circumstances.

    The practical answer is that if you do not have an exceptional circumstance (if you had one, you would know it), you should apply in the district of your legal residence. If uncertain, admissions and the MOC's staff in the district in which you want to apply are the best sources for information.
     
  7. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    Legal opinions notwithstanding, why try to game the system? Put your best foot forward and hope for the best.
     
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  8. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    There are valid reasons for seeking a nomination outside of the legal residence. If faced with that choice, it would be unwise not to consider the relative competitiveness of the two districts. In many cases the relative competitiveness can not be determined. In some cases it is a no-brainer.
     
  9. time2

    time2 10-Year Member

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    Each MOC makes their own rules for who can apply for their NOM. You have no way to know how many will apply this year, so what may have been true last year, might not be the case this year with regard to perceived 'competitiveness'.

    Make sure to READ the website for your MOC, since that is where they specify those requirements. Typical example shown below for the state of Georgia:

    https://woodall.house.gov/services/service-academy-nominations

    An eligible applicant must be:

    • At least 17 years old, but not have passed his/her 23rd birthday;
    • A U.S. citizen, residing in the Seventh Congressional District of Georgia;
    • Unmarried, not pregnant and have no legal obligation to support children or other dependents;
    • An individual of good moral character who is trustworthy, emotionally stable and motivated.
     
  10. Mmmidshipman

    Mmmidshipman Member

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    I am from a military family who owns houses in two different states. CA is my parent’s home of record, but we no longer live there. I was told by multiple reps from Admissions that I could apply to either state and to choose the state/district that I would have a better chance at obtaining a nomination from. I chose the state I live in now for that reason, and because it was easier to interview in person.
     
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