2/2 or 4/1? (NROTC-MO)

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Melitzank, May 6, 2013.

  1. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    So here's the scenario: I've done track my freshman year and this year, and I'm not horrible, but not great. I do enjoy swimming too, and am contemplating whether or not to just do two more years of track, or try my hand at swimming next year. Would it look bad on my ROTC application to have 2 years of one sport, and then 2 of another?

    NROTC-MO if it matters at all.

    Thanks! :thumb:
     
  2. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    For what it is worth, I think it is more important to show leadership and physical fitness than being a single sport athlete. Rising to a captain or leadership position is probably more likely if you stay with one sport. So if you change events, you will have to find alternate ways to demonstrate leadership.

    Both track and swimming should help your PFT score so that is a plus.

    Good luck.
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    +1 to USMCGrunt. If you're going for NROTC MO being a good long distance runner is important. You'll need to do 3 miles in at least 21 minutes to get to and through OCS. Any way to do both? Just a thought.... I have no idea if the seasons overlap or not. If not track, maybe cross country and swimming? Swimming would be great for your core and perhaps even help improve run times.
     
  4. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    That's what I've been thinking as well, doing both. I'll definitely do swimming, and then see how it plays out with track (they don't overlap).

    Thanks USMCGrunt and kinnem!

    Edit to add: Kinnem, just curious, what's the "usual" length that your DS runs for PT? What's the farthest he's ever had to run?
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    A good question to which I don't know the answer. I doubt they do more, or much more, than 3 miles for PT as time would probably not permit it.

    I also know that he and some buddies did a 5.5 mile ruck run (35 pound packs) in about an hour while I was visiting him on campus recently. I also know they've done longer ruck runs. They also go on just long runs, or hill runs, or any other kind of run you can imagine... but I have no certainty as to distance. But that's not official stuff, so you can say he sorta does it on his own. He no longer trains specifically for the PFT but just works his whole body, stamina, and mental toughness. He often does sprint intervals. He does some swimming but I don't think the distances are excessive. His most recent PFT was a 298 so his run time was somewhere between 18:10 and 18:20 for the 3 miles.

    I expect next spring he'll be doing a lot more running, and rucking, and ruck runs... and I mean a lot more... in preparation for OCS.

    USMCGrunt might have some input on this as well.
     
  6. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Melitzank: You ask two questions here. 1) the usual length of PT runs and 2) farthest he has ever "had to run"

    kinnem is dead on. ROTC unit runs (formation runs) are probably not going to be over 5 miles. There is a lot more intention for these than training and endurance. They build cameraderie and unit cohesiveness. I would guess that most of these runs are probably 3 miles in length.

    Every ROTC student better be doing a lot more personal training than this. There is no way you can get in the shape you need with only the morning ROTC unit workouts. Running, lifting, cross training, etc are all necessary to get yourself to the level you need. This is all done on your own time, with or without buddies. You need to plan for it and make sure it happens in addition to school and other organized activities.

    As kinnem states, mixing up the running is key also. Long/ short; spring/ jog; hills/ flat, ruck sack/ pt gear; boots/ running shoes; etc.

    As an example, my DS who's semester ended last week has run every day. Anywhere from 1 mile to 10. Believe me, he is no cross country star - more the football/ basketball sports. Last night he did 5 hard miles followed by a 1 mile "cool down". He often wears a pack with weights in it.

    Hope that helps!
     
  7. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    Thanks kinnem and USMCGrunt! I figure once I get a decent 3 mile time down, I might as well start going ever farther to be ahead of the game, that's some good input. :thumb:
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    As you said, get the three mile run down first. When you go beyond it be careful not to overdo it. Injury is a real possibility. Everyone in my son's unit is quite careful about avoiding stupid injuries. Your career is at stake.
     
  9. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    Aye aye, sir! :thumb: Will do. Definitely wouldn't want to make all that progress and then go 20 steps back.
     

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