A lot of questions about ROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by crice, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. crice

    crice New Member

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    Serving in the United States Armed Forces has always appealed to me. Lately, now that I am in college, I've grown more and more interested in pursuing some avenue in ROTC and have been checking out the websites and various information about it. However I still have a lot of questions about it- from applying for ROTC scholarships as a transfer, to which branch I should pursue (and maybe my chances?). Anyways, I'm basically looking for some human interaction without getting involved with a recruiter- if anyone would send me a private message, I have a lot of questions to ask regarding my situation at the moment and future plans.

    Thanks for any help, I really appreciate it.
     
  2. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    Posters are anonymous on this site. Perhaps if you ask you questions in the public ROTC forum more people can contribute advice and other potential ROTC candidates might be able to benefit from that shared knowledge. Just a suggestion...
     
  3. crice

    crice New Member

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    You're right, I just wasn't sure if it was appropriate for me to post it all here.
    Sorry for my naive questions.

    I am currently undecided on which branch of ROTC to pursue.Two interest me more than the rest however, and that is AFROTC and the Marines. My grandfather served in the Air Force, so I sort of want to make it a family tradition, but I'm also very interested in the Marines. I currently attend Boston University and have a 3.85 GPA and applied to transfer to several high-end schools, most offer ROTC at a different campus.
    This year I tried out Army ROTC and really enjoyed it, PT was fine for me for the most part. I'm mostly a runner so I am a bit weak, but I hope I can sort that out over summer. However I had to stop because my roommate would stay up until 5 AM, which was when I had to wake up.
    So my questions:
    - What should I consider when choosing what branch of ROTC? What should I really be thinking about?
    -What would my shot at getting a scholarship be?
    -As a college transfer, would I apply for a scholarship during the summer to whatever schools I get into?
    -I don't plan on having a career in the military, but I do want to do (what I consider) my part. Is it normal to attend graduate school after the four required years?

    Once again, I'm really sorry if these questions seem stupid (I know I am forgetting some). I just avoided posting it in the first place because of the annoying preface to my questions.
    Thanks.
     
  4. plmmar

    plmmar Member

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    No question is a stupid question here.
    There are a lot of knowledgeable people who can give good advice based on their experiences plus the moderator helps too.:smile:
     
  5. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    IMHO you should consider which branch has the best uniforms. Just kidding. I'd consider the mission of each branch and try to evaluate how you would see yourself fitting in with that mission. For instance, if you realy think you'd enjoy serving as an officer on a ship then the Air Force and Army are probably not for you.
    This varies from branch to branch and your college major will also have an effect. Traditionally (the last 10 years or so) the Army has had more in-college scholarships to award than the other branches. The Air Force and now the Navy seem to be more interested in engineering and medical field majors. Your best bet would be to discuss this question with the various ROTC cadre at the different colleges that you are considering.
    Each college is different but I think most require you to apply in the Spring. Call the colleges you are considering and ask their admissions personnel.
    Edit: I just re-read your question. Were you asking about when to apply for a ROTC scholarship at a college that you were considering transferring to? If so, the normal process is to join the ROTC unit first and then apply for a scholarship. I'm sure the Recruiting Officers at the programs you are considering can give you a specific time line and some idea of what scholarships you might be considered for.
    No. Most ROTC grads get commissioned after they finish their undergrad program. That's not to say that it is impossible to attend grad school immediately after graduation, just difficult and requires the approval of the military branch you are being commissioned. They do not approve many requests.
    No need to apologize. You should ask as many questions as you can think of before making a commitment to any ROTC program. Hopefully some other posters will correct any wrong information that I've posted and add some more insight for you.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
  6. plmmar

    plmmar Member

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    "What should I consider when choosing what branch of ROTC? What should I really be thinking about?"

    What type of military service appeals to you? Flying, going to sea or being a soldier. Look at the mission of each service and see which one appeals to you the most. I was a Navy brat-carriers kept my Dad from home 6-9 months at a time-I joined the Coast Guard to be a lifesaver and I knew I wanted a smaller less formal service than the larger organizations-my kids joined and want to join the Army for the "adventure and excitement"-I tried to encourage them to join the Air Force because they always had a reputation of treating their people better than the other services.
    What else to consider?-what kind of job do you want to do and which service can best support that interest? One of my boys wants to be an engineer and the Army Corps of Engineers appeals to him.
    Do you want to see the world?
    I think one of the things you should look at is matching your interests to the mission of the particular service. They are not all the same.
     
  7. crice

    crice New Member

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    Thanks for the help!
    Another question I have-is it common to attend graduate school after your required years of service are finished?

    Also, my majors are most like going to be something along the lines of International Relations and Entrepreneurship (I'm not 100% decided). Most likely pre-law. Maybe Army would be my best shot.

    My parents (dad especially) have been pushing me towards Air Force, he isn't crazy about the idea in general
    another one of my motivating factors is a striving for a real sense of brotherhood, but I'd assume this spreads across all areas.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
  8. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    Considering your intended major I'd agree that the Army might be your best shot. Plus you have already had one year of the AROTC program. You might also want to consider the USMC. They do not have a requirement for a specific major. Keep in mind that it is not impossible to get a scholarship from either the Air Force or Navy with your intended major, just more difficult than if you were to choose one of their "technical" majors (or Tiers).

    I can't advise you about how common it is for former ROTC officers to attend grad school after their active duty obligation is complete. If you want to do it there is certainly nothing that would prevent that course of action.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
  9. Eagle 1

    Eagle 1 Member

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    Just tagging onto this - whenever you've got questions about something that will affect your life, ask them. Don't be afraid of asking "stupid" or common questions. Sometimes the same ones are answered here, but no one here really minds pointing you in the right direction and giving you the information that you need.
     
  10. House06

    House06 Member

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    Plus additionally after serving your active duty obligation, you will most likely be eligible for the post 9-11 veterans' educational benefits which can greatly defray the costs of graduate school.
     
  11. plmmar

    plmmar Member

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    "As a college transfer, would I apply for a scholarship during the summer to whatever schools I get into?"

    Applications for scholarships happen after you've enrolled and are attending
    the school. It would be best to speak to the "Professor of Military Science" at the school you intend to enroll at. They could give you more information about "campus-based scholarships". They are not recruiters per se and could give you a better idea about your chances. Some may require you to be in attendance for a semester prior to applying. Be advised that the scholarship process has been very competitive lately. It is good that you are finding out as much as possible beforehand to improve your chances of being awarded a scholarship.
     
  12. GAMCJROTCMOM

    GAMCJROTCMOM Member

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    My daughter applied to the NROTC - Marine option scholarship and the AROTC scholarship. She is pre-med/nursing major. She applied for Army - nursing and MC/biochemistry and received the Army scholarship but not the Marine Corps scholarship. We've heard that the engineering and math majors have a real advantage in Navy or MC scholarships. Army or Air Force might be a better option for you for pre-law. Good luck!
     
  13. supportivemom

    supportivemom Member

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    you will need to pass medical exam for rotc. make sure you meet the standards for eyesight. and research any disqualifying conditions that may apply to you. many areas of service are off limits to those with less than perfect vision, and not all are correctible by lasix, prk.
     
  14. The OC Josh

    The OC Josh Member

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    I don't know exactly how it works, but I know alot of officers actually attend Grad school during their required years of service. If the Army pays for it, I believe there is an additional time commitment.
     

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