ALO Interview - Help!

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by LordWillO, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. LordWillO

    LordWillO VMI '17 Appointee

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, I am a Senior and I have my interview scheduled with my ALO tomorrow. What kind of questions should I prepare for, and what else can I do to prepare for the interview? And should I wear a suit and tie? Or something less formal?

    Thanks,

    -Will
     
  2. falconfamily

    falconfamily Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Messages:
    671
    Likes Received:
    9
    The best thing to do is be yourself. Dress respectfully like you are going for a job interview, but don't dress in a way that makes you uncomfortable. As for questions, if you practice too much, it comes out in the interview and while you may give the perfect answer it will be percived differently. Answer thoughtfully and honestly and that will often give people the best impression of you. JMHO.
     
  3. CheeringHimOn

    CheeringHimOn Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    We haven't had near the experience as many who post on this forum. The one thing we learned when our ds was going through the process last year, like falconfamily said, is how important it is to communicate who you are.

    Be sure you know your story. Not just what you have done but why you chose to do it. Then be confident in why you desire a career in the U.S. Air Force.
    We wish you well in your pursuit of this very worthwhile goal!
     
  4. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    343
    Okay...here's a couple:

    a. Why do I pick YOU over the other 11 candidates I have? What makes you special? They're all great candidates...why YOU?

    b. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Then I pause...then I ask: "How about Arlington?" And then I see how they react.

    There...two to contemplate. Don't let them knot you up...

    BE YOURSELF!!! BE HONEST...BE ATTENTIVE...

    It'll work fine.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  5. LFry94

    LFry94 USAFA C1C '17

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Messages:
    882
    Likes Received:
    53
    I wore a suit to my ALO meeting. My ALO was really cool and asked me questions just like what flieger mentioned.

    I would also agree with falconfamily. Don't try to act like someone you're not and you'll be fine. ALOs deal with a lot of candidates and can see right through all of the different acts. Show him/her how hard you've worked for it and show genuine interest. If this is what you want, your ALO will see it.
     
  6. zira1002

    zira1002 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    The ALO interview is not that bad. Don't stress yourself out over it, or they will notice. Like everyone else has mentioned, just be yourself and show how much you really want to come to USAFA.
     
  7. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,580
    Likes Received:
    800
    The first thing my one son's ALO asked him was: Are you prepared to drop bombs on people, knowing the consequences of that action?

    Makes a 17 year old stand up and take notice.
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    Fencer,

    DS had that question too, but it was at the MOC interview.
     
  9. kfacademy

    kfacademy USMA Appointee 2017

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    0

    For this type of questions, or others like "Do you want to serve in the Air Force" or "Are you prepared to die for your country?" is a confident YES sir or NO sir the proper thing to say and if they wish you to elaborate further you will be asked or do they expect an explained answer? Long answer to questions(and try to not to ramble) or short concise answer? Thanks:smile:
     
  10. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    872
    I've been asked many times by applicants for the academy, as well as those I help with job interviews; about long vs short answers.

    I always ask them if they read novels. I also ask them if they've ever read a technical manual. Could you handle reading a 400 page manual on the complete assembly of a car? That would be pretty dry. Could you handle a 400 page Steven King novel. Probably yes. Definitely much more than the GMC assembly manual.

    So, where am I going with this. I have interviewed a lot of people in my life. Some candidates to the academy. Some applying to college. Some job interviews. Some of these people had very interesting stories and lives. I could listen to a 3-5 minute answer from some because they grabbed my attention, kept me interested, and made me want to listen. Then there are some that after 15 seconds, I wish they would just SHUT UP.

    So, there is no right answer to your question. Those who interview, sit on boards, etc... are NOT ROBOTS. We are human beings just like you. We are your audience. If you interest us, we will want to listen. Even if it's a longer answer, description, etc... On the other hand, if your attitude sucks, you are dry and not interesting, then even a short answer isn't going to impress us.

    But don't take what I say as some guideline. ALL people are interesting to listen to or have a dialog with, IF, they are knowledgeable and passionate about the topic. If the candidate has a passion about serving their country; dropping bombs; willing to die; etc..., and they have a true individual belief and opinion of the topic, then they'll have no problem keeping my attention. Length of the answer won't matter. But if the candidate is trying to give me some "Politically Correct" answer; or one that they think I WANT to hear, or obviously sounds like something their parents or someone else told them to say, or overly rehearsed....... then I probably won't be impressed with it. Long or short.

    Just be yourself. Be honest. Be sincere. Make it YOUR ANSWER and not the parent's or someone else's. Then, simply answer the question. Use REAL WORDS. The only time I would recommend using a simply YES/NO type answer, is if it's a question you truly do not care about. But if you don't care about bombing others or dying, then I would have a problem with that. Best of luck.... mike....
     
  11. Boozebin

    Boozebin Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Messages:
    647
    Likes Received:
    313
    My opinion is no and here's why.

    Early on when my DS came to me and said this is what he wanted I asked him are you prepared to take someones life and he said yes. I asked him really? How does he know? How does any young teenager really know what it's like to take a life? I think the question is designed for two things. A) To see if the candidate has given it any thought and B) To remind them that this is the business we're in. Whether you're the one actually pulling the trigger or the one back in finance that's supporting the person out in the field it's what we do in the raw sense of it.

    I'm not saying he shouldn't pull the trigger but I wanted him to understand is that pulling the trigger is his decision and he should be prepared for the consequences of his decision on whether he pulls the trigger or not.

    Once again just my opinion on this one question so what I recommend is do some serious thinking on your own and give the answer that's right for you. That, in my opinion, will resonate more with the interviewer.

    Will
     
  12. kfacademy

    kfacademy USMA Appointee 2017

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cristcorp, your response is so helpful as always! I definitely have strong opinions and believe what I say so its good to know that I can explain myself if I feel the need. Your description of what and you would and would not want to listen to is excellent. Thanks!!

    Boozebin, Thank you for your words of wisdom. It certainly is a topic I have given much thought and will continue to think about.
     
  13. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,580
    Likes Received:
    800
    Some interviewers will ask you for an explanation or an expansion, some really don't want to hear more. Part of the process is determining how you will respond to such questions and how you will adapt your (always truthful) answers to your audience. Even saying "Yes, but may I explain a bit?" makes you sound thoughtful and courteous. But keep it short and concise.

    No rambling high school drama.

    Christcorp - you cracked me up with the GMC manual! Remembered my dad trying to show me how to change the plugs in our old old Suburban - circa 1972. He brought home a book!
     

Share This Page