Any possible way to appeal?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by ROTC2015, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. ROTC2015

    ROTC2015 Member

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    So, I've received three Army ROTC offers. Two 3-year offers to out-of-state public schools (One of which was my first choice) and one to an in-state public school. The two out-of-state ones are 3-year scholarships and the in-state public school gave me four years. Is there any way to appeal for a four-year scholarship to my first choice? I don't know how I'll pay for the first year. After grants and school-based scholarships, I have to fork out about $22,000. My parents, together, make $43,000. I was thinking about writing a letter to Cadet Command explaining my financial situation and how I can't afford even one year at the institution I wish to go to. Any tips, ServiceAcademyForum family?
     
  2. bjkuds

    bjkuds Parent

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    I would make my first call to the ROO at the school of choice. He would be able to help you or at least guide you appropriately.
     
  3. ROTC2015

    ROTC2015 Member

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    Also, by no way am I ungrateful for what Cadet Command has already given me. It's just that, this is a really big $22,000 bump on the road to accomplishing my dreams.
     
  4. bjkuds

    bjkuds Parent

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    That's understandable...hopefully the ROO will be able to let you know of any Campus based help.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I understand your pain and fear, however, just as your family has limited funds, the military does too.

    I would try every route to get the deficit covered, but as a wife who watched many officers appeal promotion boards I would not bank on a positive result. Traditionally, the result posted is the one they stand by even if it is appealed.

    I would instead try to see if you can get FA from the school in any form.

    This is not meant in any antagonistic way, but what was your plan to pay for the school if you didn't get ROTC? Have you investigated that route to the point of no return?

    22K is a lot for 1 yr when it is 50% of your parents income, however, if they only make 43K, you should be eligible for at least Stafford subsidized and unsubsidized, plus Pell, which should bring you to about 11-12 K. What about work study or merit scholarship from the school?

    Again for posters that have never gone through the college process it is important to learn from others and make sure that you cover the WHAT IF?

    What if you don't get the scholarship? What if the scholarship is not full ride? These are difficult economic times you must prepare yourself for the what if, if you get accepted and there is no merit.
     
  6. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Pima makes very good points as usual.

    You are asking if there is a way to appeal for a transfer. Does that mean that you have already requested a transfer and it has been denied.

    Clarkson and Marist have posted extensivly about transfers. If it means transferring a 4 year from a lower cost in state school to a more expensive out of state school I believe their answer was, " Nearly Impossible"

    I agree with PIMA, have you looked at Stafford Loans or any other student loan programs to cover the first year.

    If the money is the overriding factor then the in state school sounds like the best bet.

    One thing you need to consider as well, it falls under the "What if's". What if you decide ROTC is not for you, will you be able to still pay for school. What if you do not pass PT in your first semester and are told you have to leave the program, what if you don't make the grades. Then the BIG What If, what if you get hurt and are disqualified by Dodmerb, will you still be able to stay in the school you are attending. You need to think about all these factors when selecting a school. There is an attrition rate among ROTC and there are students that face this decision every year.

    I don't mean to sound negative but CC will not care about your financial situation, there are many students in the same boat.

    Another question, you say that you will need to spend $22,000 on top of grants and merit the first year, does that include Room and Board. You will still have the Room and Board cost each year even with the scholarship unless your merit will cover that cost. Do you have merit $ for the in state school that will help with Room and Board.

    I can only say to you what I told my son, choose your school as if you are not receiving the scholarship and plan accordingly, this way you can continue if something unforseen happens.

    Good luck, I wish you the best.
     
  7. ROTC2015

    ROTC2015 Member

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    Well, Rutgers is about $36,000 a year after the inclusion of room and board. I have $8,000 a year in merit-based scholarship and $3,800 in Pell Grant and $1,420 in Rutgers Assistance Grant. That totals up to $13,220 in non-loan money. I don't know if I should take up about $20,000 in loans.
     
  8. ROTC2015

    ROTC2015 Member

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    I have a bit over $13,000 in merit and grants a year. So, when my scholarship kicks in during my sophomore year, I can afford the room and board as well.
     
  9. gojack

    gojack ....

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    PM Sent

    PM Sent
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Sometimes reality is harsh.

    Everyone here without a doubt wants you to obtain your military goal. HOWEVER, more importantly we want you to achieve your academic goal of a college degree.

    None of us are psychic, nobody can predict the next RIF. I am 1000% sure that AFROTC scholarship recipients back in 09 when they graduated from HS thought it was a done deal, keep that gpa, don't injure yourself and you will be commissioned.

    FF to late 2009 and the announcement of a RIF for the AD AF world. FF to spring 2010 and announcing that OCS was canceled along with IS scholarships, plus reduction in SFT. FF to 2011 and the all time low acceptance rate for field training. Not one of them could predict that was going to occur in time span of 18 months.

    No SFT (field training) and their scholarships were in jeopardy. In other words for some the AF would stop paying. (Remember that thing I keep saying the devil is in the details). Here they stand 2 yrs into their college and relying on that ROTC scholarship, only to find it no longer exists.

    The military is going through a drastic fiscal change, and again NOBODY can guarantee you that what it looks like now will be what it looks like in 2,3, or 4 yrs.

    Nobody can guarantee you that if you break a leg, you will be DodMERB qualified. The only guarantee we can give you is that if you make the grades to the school's requirements you will have a spot, but it doesn't mean your financial needs will be met.

    Our DS's friend went through 2 yrs AFROTC scholarship, academically no problem, went to summer field training and decided he was out of there. The AF not only released him, but came after the scholarship money since he was contracted and completed field training. Things happen.

    If money is an issue, make sure you have a back up plan for the What IF. Nothing is worse than to see a child leave because they didn't address the financial issue. Nothing will cause more stress, which will show in their grades than the burden of worry regarding how they will pay next semester, or to be locked by the school when it comes to registering.

    Trust me, our DD got locked, why? Because she went to the med. clinic and they charged her 40 bucks for meds without us knowing. Want to hear panic, that is a call that will make your world goes topsy turvy; pulling out credit cards and calling the bursar than registrar to unlock their account so they can get the class they need before it books out.

    Colleges in this economy want their money, end of subject. High demand colleges have waitlists, you are nothing more than a number, because there is always someone behind you that will take your place. Both our children are big ACC colleges, and that is how it works for both of these colleges. We always had the What IF plan in place.

    That is the reality for this economy. Harsh, but true.
     
  11. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I was born and raised in NJ, actually EB. Obviously you are OOS for RU, because all of my family still resides in NJ an IS is not 36k, that is def. OOS.

    It does put you in a predicament. RU is a strong engineering college on the east coast.

    However, it still leaves you with what now?

    You have a decision to make, find it via loans, or go to your plan B college.

    Your hand has basically been dealt. You should go with trying the appeal route, but if you can't get the loans you need to start plan B and that route. It appears you got your IS school and that means you will be covered.

    FWIW state flagship universities are typically the tight wads when it comes to merit.

    Finally place everything together, and understand that if your intention is to go AD after graduation, the college stature really does not matter at all. Also, once you do the 4/5 yrs and dive from the AD world, your work experience will matter more. RU is a good school, but it is not HYSPM. It is not UVA or UNCCH. It is on par with other east coast flagship state universities such as UMDCP, PSU, Pitt, Syracuse and VT. Your college education will not matter at all. Your work experience and resume will.

    If it is your desire to serve AD in the military as a career and costs matter I would take the IS college. If the intention is to take the reservist route and get a job straight out of college, at that point I would ask are you doing this to get the best military training from a BN or are you trying to get your college paid for using ROTC?

    Only you can answer those questions.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2011
  12. NC Ranger

    NC Ranger Member

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    Do not let $22,000 stop you from reaching your goal. Financial aid is an option for you and your family. If you are worried about paying back the loan, military pay is adequate enough for loan repayment. I left college with $25,000 of loans in 1979 and my spouse about the same. We paid our loans without difficulty while serving in the military.
     
  13. ROTC2015

    ROTC2015 Member

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    I'm considering the military as a career. It's just that the in-state school is ironically five hours further away than the out-of-state Rutgers. I live in NYC, so Rutgers is about 45 minutes way. Currently, I am talking about loans with my parents, and they're on board. $22,000 is nothing compared to what my peers are taking out to go to NYU and other institutions.
     
  14. ROTC2015

    ROTC2015 Member

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    Thanks for the reassurance!
     
  15. jagabiti

    jagabiti Member

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    Did you say you rec'd a AROTC to Rutgers? So did my DS! Are you going to accept it or transfer and why? Just wondering...
     

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