Are these military recruiting commercials serious?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by LineInTheSand, Dec 28, 2013.

  1. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Not sure if you've seen them yet, but the transition has begun for recruiting commercials from those about service to others to those about service to self.

    The one that REALLY gets be, the Army commercial in basic with the guy being yelled at "Why did you join the Army?" "To be a graphic designer!" Um.......
     
  2. Strength and Honor

    Strength and Honor Member

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    I think the National Guard is the only "branch" that does their commercials right. They actually emphasize serving your community/state and helping people.

    The Marines just try to sell you on the Call of Duty tough guy stuff. The Air Force is all about sci-fi coolness. The Navy is all about travel. And now the Army's most recent commercial is just.... Wow. But hey they're the experts, they supposedly know what kids my age want to see....
     
  3. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    I saw a Marine Corp commercial today that was all about the Marine delivering aid. Same taste as a recent Army one.

    Honestly, we can pay people a lot less to deliver aid if we need to.

    They should highlight what makes a service unique. This "check out an Army job that will help you in the private sector" isn't genuine.
     
  4. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I think you just answered you own question, as not too many questions from you peers about toughest thing or worst thing I experienced while I was in the Army, but more about grad schools and jobs after getting out of the Army . . .
     
  5. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    I think you're explaining how it is once you're in, not as you're being recruited. "What will I do when I get out" and "what are my grad school opportunities" weren't on my mind as I applied to CGA, or through some of my time as a cadet. They DID become questions once I commissioned.

    I don't think it's the #1 or #2 reason people join, but I do think it creeps in there.
     
  6. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I believe that is the challenge - "recruiting" or volunteering to serve.
     
  7. BR2011

    BR2011 USAFA Cadet

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    They're trying to take advantage of the fact that there probably aren't too many jobs available in the private sector right now but the Army can offer you a job in a field you like.

    What's wrong with people joining because they can do a job they are interested in? Do you really want a service full of people who are in it only because they "love America" but not excited about what they do at work everyday?
     
  8. ABF

    ABF Member

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    For the longest time the Navy and Air Force were able to recruit based on selling a trade or with the technology angle. The Army has been all over the board with its recruiting tactics that included offering trade training, technology, tradition, and often "college money". The Marines have done quite well sticking to selling tradition and high standards rather than selling a trade or future college tuition assistance. But then, each branch has it's own special recruiting needs.

    I'm fine with the "graphic design training" recruiting angle the Army is taking. Like it or not, there are hundreds of career path to choose from in the Army, and those careers need certain people willing to do the job. Though you will have to first be a people killer by training, you CAN get training and work in the Army in graphic design. (No, it's not likely you will take that experience and make a fortune in the civilian world. I would hope that recruit knows enough to understand that.) But then again, what graphic designers in the civilian world do you know that have gotten the opportunity to fly nap of the earth through the Korean DMZ in a Blackhawk helicopter after their day at the office?
     
  9. payitforward

    payitforward Member

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    People are always asking DS what he plans to do after the Army. His response is consistent: "I'm not thinking that far ahead." He gets annoyed that people focus so much on what happens AFTER military service because he feels that what's important right now is that he prepare himself as best he can for the inevitability that people's lives may depend on the snap decisions he makes. That's as far as he's gotten in his planning. He's very focused on the goal.

    I think that he figures that as long as he gives life the best he has to give, all the other stuff will fall into place.

    I'm ok with that too.
     
  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Your DS has the right priorities and I agree with your philosophy. I believe things will always work out for an intelligent, educated, hard working individual with leadership skills. Almost seems like, how could they not?
     
  11. Strength and Honor

    Strength and Honor Member

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    I think it would be wise to start thinking that far ahead though. Get a degree in basketweaving, then find out you don't like the Army or get injured before you can commission, and you're screwed. The Army is my main goal too, but that doesn't mean I don't prepare for the inevitable: life after the Army.
     
  12. payitforward

    payitforward Member

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    Well, you're absolutely right, of course. I, as a parent, know this, and you, as a smart, well-rounded high school senior WELL beyond his years knows this. And my son knows it too. He picked a major that absolutely suits his interests, with plans to graduate with fluency in a strategic language that can have the power to open many doors in the military and in the business and higher education worlds, and he'll earn a leadership minor as well. He's got his priorities straight, and I'm frankly quite glad his school offers this realistic path to a career beyond the Army. He just gets annoyed when people ASK him about that "life beyond the Army" because for now, he's chomping at the bit to serve his country, and THAT'S his personal passion. He doesn't really want to talk to the rest of us about the beyond part.
    :zip:
     
  13. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    The question "What will you do when you leave the Military" always puzzled me as well. Nobody seems to ever ask a civilian college grad what they will do when they leave their first job.

    As much as I have looked I have never seen a college that offers a "Basket Weaving Degree", sounds fun though.

    My wife is a VP at her bank, she has a BA in Health, go figure.

    Your son will leave the Army with leadership and management skills that will be beyond his peers after 4 years, his future will be what he makes it.
     
  14. Coltron

    Coltron Candidate

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    When you want people to stop asking "what do you plan to do after the military", just give the answer, "who says I'm going to live that long?" But in all seriousness, its best to have a back up plan. Not wanting to talk about future plans does not show leadership, only ignorance and close mindedness. It would probably look a lot better to people if your DS gave a well thought about response to the question with an actual back up plan, rather than just shut out the question. That's maturity in my opinion, but what do I know?
     
  15. payitforward

    payitforward Member

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    Thanks for the reminders. To clarify about my DS though, he gets annoyed at the question, and he tells me and his father about that, but when asked, of COURSE he respectfully answers the question and engages people in thoughtful conversation, never letting on that he's annoyed. He is neither ignorant nor closed-minded nor rude enough to actually tell someone other than his parents or a very close friend that he doesn't like the question. He IS a leader, and more skilled than most at communication, hence, the strategic language emphasis.
     
  16. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Frankly, I think the Marines have done much better with their ad campaigns than the other services. "Selling" high standards is something all the services should do. The Marines found something they are good at, and stuck with it. The other services occasionally come up with something witty, but six months later are doing a new routine.

    Selling tech or job experience is not bad, but it seems like a passing shot to get the relatively uncommitted. The Marines challenge people with a "we're dutiful badasses, what about you?" while the AF says "Look! It's high tech!" Perhaps we'd be better off with an implied challenge to attract the best pilots, computer hackers, logistics types, etc.
     
  17. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    Really Really true. Looking at my DS and most soldiers I have met, I may add confidence and maturity far beyond their years.
     
  18. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    +1 Very true and that should be his main focus. Best Wishes.
     
  19. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Evidently not much. These aren't people he's interviewing with. They're friends and friends of parents. He needn't discuss anything with them he would rather not discuss. His business, not ours.
     
  20. Aveon

    Aveon Member

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    Well this thread really got off topic, but at the risk of ruffling feathers on my post, here goes: @payitforward; I, too, have a son who is on an ROTC critical language scholarship. Though believe me, being a good “communicator” is neither required, nor completely created by that degree.

    As well, I can see why your message was perhaps a little misconstrued by others on this thread. If my kids were ever “annoyed” by well-intentioned friends, parental friends, or anyone else for that matter, I would be having a sit down talk with them- regardless of their age. Questions of the nature that you speak of, I would never deem as “interviewing” or “interrogating” as another poster insinuated. But on the contrary, I view it as a mere conversational question out of concern, caring, and interest for my child. If my son has not thought that far ahead, I would hope he would merely say so and move on. I understand your son is polite when asked, that’s very cordial of him. But why would he later be bothered by that question at all? I have several kids, who are all highly focused and extremely passionate about their future and present position in life, and each can tell you where they see themselves in 5, 10, or 20 years down the road. Yet, none of them would bat an eye or be upset at being asked that question.

    Things happen, life doesn’t go as always planned, and thinking of a backup plan or “afterwards” plan is very realistic and always a great idea. Now, do they have to discuss it? No. But be annoyed that they were even asked? I’d say that’s somewhat odious. :eek:

    These wonderful, precarious young men and women posting and/or being discussed on this forum are going to encounter many uncomfortable events, situations, and questions going forward into their military careers- and personal lives. I think what a couple of the other young posters were simply trying to say is that a condition of maturity and leadership is the ability to not become so easily annoyed, but instead laugh it off and move on, or just be simply grateful for people in life who care enough to inquire about you. :thumb:

    And I’m sure over a cup of coffee we’d all laugh and not be offended by what’s being said, but that’s one drawback to written communication where all things can be misconstrued without facial and vocal cues to go from. So, were stuck with these silly smiles to help us out :shake:

    Happy New Year to all!
     

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