Argument over sports

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by navy2016, Oct 10, 2010.

  1. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    2
    I just had another one of these student-parent arguments.

    Objective: What are some more points supporting why any applicant to the SA's should do sport(s)?

    Originally they supported my decision to do sports, but now they are objecting to soccer in particular.

    Background:
    I am 16 and a junior. I am aware that nearly all SA cadets/mids were athletes in HS and are now athletes. Most of them were varsity athletes in HS and many earned varsity letters. I do not work after school or have anything hindering the time to do sports except my parents.

    Narrative:
    I was arguing to my parents that I should do soccer versus track (which I originally planned to do) since it is a team sport and many of my friends/classmates play soccer. My school has the IB/MYP Program and students zoned for our school (virtually all the IB students hand around together and play soccer). Our school allows everyone to make the team but skills enable people to actually play during games. I do not have previous experience in either one within the past 5 years.

    Their point:

    Since my eyesight is somewhat questionable I may eventually be disqualified even if I meet the academic criteria, I am better off using more of my time to study. Their reasoning is that if I do not get appointed to the academies with a strong academic background I can still go to a decent college with ROTC.
    But I thought most ROTC cadets were also athletes in HS that succeeded as scholars, as a leader, and as athletes.

    Since I have been wearing corrective lenses at night for over 5 years I have no clue what my uncorrected vision is now.

    They are more supportive in me joining clubs because they believe clubs do not drain my energy.

    I feel like for one to succeed at any one of the academies, one must be able to balance between studying and sports.


    Please help
     
  2. knight66

    knight66 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Work the sports as well for many reasons.
    First off, your health no matter where you end up for school.
    Time managment, teamwork, interaction with classmates, how to handle adverse situations... I could go on and on.
    On the vision/lens thing, it's corrected vision not uncorrected so hope things work out.
     
  3. sgmom

    sgmom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2010
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    I sent you a PM
     
  4. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    While serving as Superintendent of West Point, General Douglas MacArthur emphasized the importance of athletics in the development of cadets with his now famous quotation:

    "Upon the fields of friendly strife are sown the seeds, that upon other fields, on other days, will bear the fruits of victory."​

    Through athletics, every cadet competes and is challenged at the highest level of physical ability. It is an opportunity to develop self-confidence and self-discipline, a sense of fair play, team spirit, and the capacity to think and act under stress. Thus, athletics serve the larger mission and purpose of the Military Academy.

    (from USMA Admissions)
     
  5. goldfarb1

    goldfarb1 Candidate

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    0
    1. Forget admissions...

    How do they advise you to get excercise?

    Watching some of the IB kids (the one's who tend do 150 clubs, with no leadership and no sports) at my school in anything physical is almost comical. Most can't run a sub 9:30 mile. Wait let me rephrase that. Most can't run a mile. Who know's how that is reflected in their health.

    2. Even if you were to put the academy aside and assume you got a DQ for eyesight...most competitive schools want to see some form of sports. Doing 150 different clubs IMO is a waste of time. Let's say you are in the business club. What the heck does the business club do? Stand around and talk about business for 30 minutes? How about the republican club? Stand around and talk about how the liberal media is taking over the world?

    Sports will make you more competitive to top schools. Assuming you have the grades for the academy, you also have the grades for a top 30 school. Most people applying to top 30 schools will have the same grades. How do you think they get differentiated? You'll be a very average candidate if all you have is a club and your grades.

    3. Sports are a good relief from school. You need a break at some point.
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,509
    Likes Received:
    459
    There is a place for ECAs (clubs) and sports. In terms of clubs, I emphasize to candidtes that it's not: (1) how many clubs you join or even (2) your position in the club. It's what you actually do. You can be President and do nothing or can simply be a member that organizes and leads events. Also, it's better to be very involved in a few clubs than just being a member of many.

    You should pick activities b/c they interest you and not b/c they will or won't look good on your application. So, if you're really interested in animals, you might volunteer at the SPCA, you might do fostering of pets, you might work to match homeless animals with new homes, etc. You can do all of that w/o joining a club and without being "president."

    As for sports, you are very unlikely to be accepted into a SA w/o having done any. Not a guarantee of a turndown but a total lack of sports will be viewed negatively. Why?

    First, sports are a very important part of life at SAs. If you've never done them, there's concern you won't like them and thus may not do well at the SA.

    Second, sports foster competition (very important at SAs), teamwork (very important at SAs) and fitnesss (very important at SAs).

    As for concerns re "drainingyour energy," you haven't seen the concept until plebe year at a SA. Best to start dealing with it now.
     
  7. PositiveThinking

    PositiveThinking Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    2
    As a mother of teenage boys, may I say that having sports as an outlet to drain some energy can be a very good thing for everyone! In fact, there are times when I'll say to my boys: "Go work out....NOW!". :biggrin:

    Seriously, most teenagers have an excess of energy, and sports are a healthy, positive way to release some of it. It's all a balancing act.
     
  8. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    2
    I personally agree and want to do sports but the mom factor defense is keeping me off the field.

    I go to bed at 12 AM. Do I really need to? no
    Nowadays, I am used to this and thrive on 6-7 hours of sleep every night.



    Academically:mad::
    My parents are NOT remotely impressed (in fact it was more like, you are not a moron but you still need serious improvement) by a 31 comp(math 33 and Eng 30) on ACT nor being ranked 8 out of 285. I can probably hit 32 or 33 next time.

    Physically:
    Due to the secret workouts I do over the summer I am capable of scoring near or above the listed averages on the CFA and possibly maxing out on push-ups

    I do not believe this child-parent debate will impress any BGOs if I make it that far in the process:confused:
     
  9. usna2012mom

    usna2012mom Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    0
    Maybe the issue isn't sports at all..How do your parents feel about your desire to be in the military? Some parents are uneasy about their child in the military. You sound like you are doing your research. Discuss what you know with your parents.
    Regarding eyesight. You do not have to have perfect eyesight to pass the Dodmerb physical. There are perameters, but it isn't perfect or nothing. You will also have to pass Dodmerb exam for ROTC.
     
  10. osdad

    osdad Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    28
    Regarding your choice of a sport to jump into: do track. Soccer - if its being played at any level above elementary school requires skills that cannot be mastered quickly. OTOH: you already know how to run.
     
  11. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    2
    Quick update:
    Well my mom (one really in charge) stills put her foot on a no.


    Second question:

    Does it really help if I did a sport during my senior year?

    If I train myself to be able to get max or near max on CFA will that offset the fact that I don't have a sport background?

    I do realize the 10 percent of successful applicants that did not do sports probably worked or volunteered after school and I do not fit in that category.

    The thing about that is the time I will spend training myself will probably be as much time as I was conditioning, practicing, or playing a sport (ironically, my mom CAN live with that).

    My plan for an appeal:
    Spend 1.5 hours a day working out/running and prove to my mom that my grades still have not dropped. Then I can try to ask her again.
     
  12. osdad

    osdad Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    28
    The only guarantee anyone here can give you is that if you do not complete your application you will not be admitted.

    Doing a sport only during your senior may not add much to your package. Its perhaps a little better then joining a dozen clubs as resume padding but not much. OTOH, most areas have club soccer teams that start up after HS season is over. You might think about trying out for one of them. Then you'd be able to show almost a full year of sport - when you make the HS team next fall.

    Or, work out to improve your CFA - you can send in updates as you improve. It will show determination - a good thing.
     
  13. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    1
    The issues here are 3 fold ...
    1. Looking like a good fit for USNA, i.e. perception of others who count. Remember, they've seen it all. ALL! Candor and honesty always trump posturing.

    2. Being a good fit for USNA, i.e. reality/substance. If you're asking these questions, what does that say?

    3. How's it "going?", i.e. trends/momentum. Those on the rise (or cruise-control) are fully and readily identifiable. One is much preferred to the other.

    Work at looking good, being good, becoming better.
     
  14. MomoftheMagik

    MomoftheMagik Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    2
    You said your parents were good with you doing track? Go ahead and do that because the goal is to get some exercise and to compete in a sport. Soccer is a great sport, but so is track.

    If your parents are on board with USNA, you all need to understand that, if you can't do a sport and keep up with your academics now, you will be in big trouble during your plebe year! A full academic load, mandatory sport, military drill and training, parades, ECs, workouts, inspections, signature sheets,...a seemingly endless to-do list awaits the Plebe, and mom and dad aren't there for comfort or to tell you how to organize your time.

    I agree with USNA2012mom. Maybe a dialogue with the rents regarding the military in general is in order. Be respectful and show them your passion for USNA! All the best as you pursue your dreams!
     
  15. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hopefully the final update:


    Thanks to everyone who commented as this could be beneficial to someone else in the same situation years down the road.

    After a week of arguing, my mother gave in and will allow me to start soccer conditioning this Wednesday.
    The main reason I chose to do soccer over track is because the coach, whom I have already known from last year, understands the situation of most of us academically oriented students. He understands that we are playing for fun to to be fit versus trying to get recruited to college for sports. If I need a recommendation from him, I believe I can get a strong positive one based on my work instead of natural talent.
     

Share This Page