Army Green to Gold Questions

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Frankie, Jul 18, 2015.

  1. Frankie

    Frankie Member

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    Hello all! As the title says, I have a few detailed questions regarding this program. I've read as much as I could on the Army's website and all, so I politely ask to try to refrain from directing me to the website unless it answers the questions I ask specifically. Thank you!

    A little more background to help, I'm speaking in the perspective of an enlisted soldier that has gone to college for a few years.

    1) I know that being contracted and then disenrolled from ROTC disqualifies you from G2G, but what if you have taken AROTC classes and received credit for it and did not contract ? Would you simply retake the classes, go to LTC or what?

    2) It says you must be a junior with 2 years remaining to graduate (21 months). What if you are a second semester junior with 2 years remaining? Would that put you as being disqualified or is it one of those unique situations that is almost completely dependent on a few high ranking individuals?

    That's it for now.

    Thank you!
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    If you took Army ROTC classes then you were enrolled in them, so when you didn't continue in the program you were disenrolled, whether you knew it or not (or at least you should have been). So somewhere there should be a disenrollment form. When you are applying and they ask you if you were ever in an officer producing program your answer should be "yes".

    You have me confused about your status. Not sure how you can be a second semester junior and still have 2 years left. Bottom line is you need to have 4 semesters of school left to do G2G. For that to happen the school you wish to attend needs to accept you as a junior and your academic plan (104r) needs to show that you will be a full time student for the next two years.
     
  3. Frankie

    Frankie Member

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    So even if you were not a contracted cadet during ROTC, being in Army ROTC and then leaving would render you disqualified to do G2G?

    Although I know that my academic planning is 100% up to me, as a new freshmen I put a little too much faith into my academic adviser who told me to take a handful of classes that did not go toward my major so I am behind a semester, despite having the credits to be a second semester junior.

    Thank you clarksonarmy for your reply.
     
  4. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    Why do you think previous ROTC enrollment makes you disqualified?? I don't believe that is the case.

    With regards to your academic status...stop thinking in terms of first or second semester. The question you need to answer is when you start in the fall will you have 4 full semesters of school work left to graduate with your degree? If so, then all you need to say is that you have been accepted as a Junior and you have 2 years of school left. That is what you need to be eligible for the Active Duty Option, the non scholarship option, or a two year G2G scholarship.
     
  5. Frankie

    Frankie Member

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    With the ROTC disenrollment, I read somewhere how being disenrolled from ROTC disqualifies you because it says so in (army regulation/cadet command regulation something). Sorry I can't remember off of memory exactly what it was tang said it. Although, I'm pretty sure that's only the case with contracted cadets that were disenrolled.
     
  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I have absolutely no doubt that it would depend on the circumstances of your dis-enrollment.
     

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