Army May Train Women For Rigor Of Front Lines

Discussion in 'Academy/Military News' started by MemberLG, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Rowan Scarborough appears to be somewhat informed and educated about the military as a reporter goes

    Washington Times July 31, 2012

    Army May Train Women For Rigor Of Front Lines Studies predict injury, attrition

    Some parts I find it interesting

     
  2. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Any Female TBS Graduate can compete with their male counterparts in the field and in some circumstances out think them and out shoot them:thumb: Oohrah:shake: Army might be different.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  3. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    The evidence presented was about physical durability in non-combat roles then superimposing those numbers to a combat role model by possibly showing even more physical durability loss. It wasn't regarding who can critically think or shoot better.
     
  4. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Interesting that they counted pregnancy as "disease or non-combat injury." :confused:
    Granted, any of them will get you removed from combat type duties.
     
  5. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    I'd be interested to see what exactly they were studying. Was it the frequency or total amount of time spent on the shelf?

    I ask because (about to make a gross generalization) men tend to ignore, deny, or downplay the smaller things until they become larger things which may lead to longer time on the shelf. Women are more likely to tend to the smaller injuries which can often minimize longer term effect on the body.

    I say this as a man who has to be dragged to the doctor's office. I'm sure I'm not alone in this way of life...

    This being said, they personality type that goes out for combat arms (the topic of this article, I guess) I would guess to be less likely to check out than others regardless of sex. The 1% of females they talk about being able to make the male standard for infantry is probably built to sustain the blows of the job (both physically and mentally) as well as their male counterparts for such duty.

    I think if they studied the females who meet male standards (and thus be eligible for infantry) and compared their time on the shelf with males they might find a different statistic. This is a more valid test of whether the introduction of women to the combat arms would have a negative impact on the availability of troops.
     
  6. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    Though the focus is the Marine Corps, I thought this was a very good article from a female officer who also definitely has the personal experience to back it up that very succinctly summed up a lot of the reservations I (personally) have about women serving in the infantry:

    http://www.mca-marines.org/gazette/article/get-over-it-we-are-not-all-created-equal

    I'm not very familiar with Army training for officers in combat arms (MFE?) branches, but the Marine Corps Infantry Officers' Course (IOC) breaks off a lot of very fit men (article above quotes attrition at 17%) and they don't send slackers to IOC. I'd assume that Army infantry training, and definitely Ranger, are not for the weak or faint of heart either.

    And completing an infantry training course like IOC and serving as an infantry officer are completely different from completing TBS.* Gutting something out for a matter of hours or even a few days on a FEX is different from dealing with the long-term misery of IOC or the grind of a deployment and general service as an infantryman.
    I've talked to a lot of senior GySgts and up with 15-20+ years in combat arms whose knees are destroyed or have other lasting health issues from carrying a combat load. It shouldn't be a surprise that those issues would be compounded in women.


    *disclaimer: I have not yet completed TBS.
     
  7. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I would think the number of females that meet the male standards will be relatively small, so hard to do a statistically valid study. For 17 - 21 age group, 15:36 in two miles will get a male 64 points, for a female 100 points; 42 push ups will get a male 60 points and 100 points.

    I also think it will be difficult to account for different MOS. Say a female Military Police meets the male standards. In general, Military Police do less dismounted patrols.

    I also think we will have to consider duty location as to going to sick call or missing few days in a big forward operating base is not a big deal, whereas going to a sick call from a patrol base to a forward operating base is a big deal.

    No study is a perfect . . . . .
     
  8. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Great article. Not saying TBS is the same as IOC. IOC much harder and Qualify for Infantry Oficer is one of the hardest Survine TBS sounds good to me
     

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