Army ROTC Scholarship and 7 year health professions program

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Armydad88, May 16, 2015.

  1. Armydad88

    Armydad88 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    11
    My DD was awarded a 3 year Army ROTC Scholarship. Contemporaneous with the ROTC scholarship, she had applied for and been accepted to the University's 7 year health professions program, spending her fourth undergraduate year as a first year medical student at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM). Those credits earned at PCOM will then transfer back to the undergraduate program and she will graduate with her class (2017) with a BS in Biology, and a full year of medical school under her belt. HOWEVER, she can't get a clear answer whether the army will allow this under the terms of the ROTC scholarship. Technically, she's be spending her MS4 year at PCOM in Philadelphia, where she can attach to an ROTC group at one of the nearby Philadelphia colleges and complete her ROTC requirements there. This will save her (the army?) a full year of tuition at an accredited medical school. She intends to apply for the Army's HSSP and would like some guidance as to whether all of these events and programs will work together. She was told by her Cadre staff that they have not faced this particular situation, so she's having a difficult time planning her educational path.

    If anyone can shed some light or direct DD to someone at Cadet Command who can guide her and give her the information she needs, all would be appreciated.


    On a side note, my DD received the Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW) award as an MS1. We are beaming with pride in this accomplishment.

    Proud dad!
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    I am confused

    Is she in the 7 year program currently? If so, isnt she taking a big leap that they will release her for ED and complete the program? Didn't she have to get academic approval when she applied for her scholarship?

    For example, when applying for AFROTC you inform them of your intended major. As a cadet in AFROTC, you sit down every semester with the CoC and have an academic progression review. If you decide to change your major, you must get their approval.

    Hence, my confusion.
     
  3. Armydad88

    Armydad88 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    11
    Yes, it sounds like the cart is before the horse, but she's trying to keep all her options open -- worst case is an educational deferral (I follow all these sentences with "potentially") and no 7 year program, instead either applying for the HSSP or the deferral. She is in the 7 year program, but doesn't have to follow through if the Army advises something different. However, all her options remain open. It's like spinning plates - she doesn't want any of them to fall so she keeps on spinning.

    3.95 overall GPA,
    276 on the APFT, with 300 in her sights.
    Army GO program this summer for Russian;
    MOWW bronze

    And the 7 year program was applied for and awarded before the Army Scholarship. Her major was declared prior to the scholarship, too.
     
  4. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,547
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    Whether she was awarded these things prior to the scholarship or not, it has no bearing on what Army will decide. Worse case is she cannot apply for HSSP or is denied and is also denied the deferral. Also, there is no tangible savings to Army at this point as they are currently under no obligation to pay for her medical degree. Also there are the issues with how does she complete the ROTC program while being somewhere else senior year, which may or may not work for ROTC. Finally, given the burdens of the program, will she even be able to successfully complete ROTC. I can't disagree with trying to keep the plates in the air but there are so many obstacles here that I'm not very hopeful.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    I agree with kinnem. In the end of the day it comes down to the needs of the Army. I would pm Clarkson.

    The way I am reading this is she is asking for a 3 year ED deferral upon commissioning now as an MSI scholarship recipient.
     
  6. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,234
    Likes Received:
    5
    I think it's great she got into the 7 year program, it is a new idea and currently very lucrative for new college kids.

    Unfortunately there is no guarantee the Army will grant her ED delay. she could finish her undergrad and the Army could decide they need an AG 2LT more than a doc. While this is unlikely it is a scary reality that could happen. It all comes down to if she wants to take the risk or not. Fortunately she could opt for guard/reserve and avoid the mess completely but then AD would not be a readily accessible option.
     
  7. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,153
    Likes Received:
    113
    Yeah, she needs to get on this now, and quickly. She should see if she can route a request now somehow to get an answer for a few reasons, but one no one will think of is how she will compete for a medical residency if given the Ed delay.

    For the Army one most usually must be on some form of orders to rotate at an Army hospital. If she is on Ed delay these might be quite tough to come by. She will be required to apply to the Army residency programs and if she is unable to secure orders to rotate to do "auditions" then she is unlikely to match into any residency that is even remotely competitive within that system.

    If she's able to get into the HPSP program which is quite possible given her background of ROTC and acceptance to med school in hand then that becomes a moot point.

    I would not have recommended ROTC to this type of applicant if the acceptance to the BS/DO program came before the ROTC acceptance.

    The other issue is if she switches out of the BS/DO would she still be on track to graduate undergrad in 4 years? My guess is yes, but I would ensure that.

    Bottom line: start finding out who to ask and how to get an official answer yesterday :)
     
    Pima likes this.
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    Armydad88 keep us updated on how this all plays out for your DD.

    It seems to me that one of the plates will need to be removed, either ROTC or her 7 year program.
    ~ Kp is right this issue needs to be answered yesterday. If that can't happen than stay on top of the cadre during the summer so it is answered before she starts her fall semester.
    ~~ I don't know how the AROTC ICSP 3 year scholarship works, but for HSSP recipients, you are on the hook if you start your sophomore year. Walk anytime after that and you are on the hook for the scholarship.
    ~~~ AFROTC cadets, and I am pretty sure it is the same for AROTC, they sign paperwork acknowledging this aspect. It basically says they get to decide if you pay back the money or go enlisted. Enlistment is rare. However, still the ball is now in their court regardless.

    I say this not only because of the ED issue, but because the demands of her academic program. MSI and very little time besides LLAB and PT will be demanded by ROTC, but as she goes up the rank in ROTC, she will have jobs within the unit. Cadet leadership positions can take 20 hours a week on top of the LLAB and PT. Can she juggle that academic program, with 20 hrs for ROTC at the same standard? If something has to give, what will it be?
    ~~ Success in ROTC is a delicate balance between both. If 1 takes a hit, than it can impact the other. IE gpa drops because of the time needed for ROTC can now impact getting an ED. ROTC participation drops because academically she needs to pay more attention there, than her CoC rec can drop and the chances for ED might too due to her OML.

    Just me, but I think this would be the time I sat down with her for a heart to heart regarding what if you can't do both at the same time. Can you afford the program without the scholarship and ED? This is impo a family decision.

    Assume that she won't get ED from the Army, would she still want to stay in ROTC or try later on via OCS. What if she stays in the academic program, but if she had the ability to see that she wouldn't be picked up for OCS would she regret leaving AROTC?

    In other words, I think this is the time she decides which path she wants more if she can't have both.

    I believe in hope for the best, but expect the worst. In this case it is if you can only have one and not the other, which would you choose? Not saying that will happen, just saying coming to terms now is better than living with What If later on.

    Good luck. Thank you, your family and her for wanting to defend this great nation.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2015

Share This Page