AROTC Summer Training

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by The OC Josh, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. The OC Josh

    The OC Josh Member

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    Did you guys get to do anything you would recommend(or not recommend) for future cadets?
    (Airborne, Air Assault, Mountain Warfare, CTLT, Internships etc)
     
  2. commanderajb

    commanderajb PC ROTC

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    I can tell you from experiences of others:

    Airborne: very physical and alot of fun for people who are into a thrill. All of these help with your LDAC score and you get to wear pin that signifies you completed the school. Even people who are scared of heights have taken the leap.

    Air Assault: This one is slightly less physical activity and alot of classroom study. However at the end, there is a 12 mile ruck march that must be completed on graduation day in order to graduate. Again you get a pin for this one.

    Mountain Warfare: This school is tough and EXTREMELY difficult to get into. Best of the best applicants get into this school. Heard it is fun though.

    CTLT: I don't think you can do this until after LDAC or during your MSIV year.

    Internships: People go all over the place and work with everything from the military to government agencies

    There is also a UK Camp Officer exchange but I don't know much about that.
     
  3. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    You have this a bit backwards. Air Assault is a much more physically demanding school than Airborne. There is a 12-mile ruck as the last event. But the school starts with a smoker of an obstacle course, followed by a PT test in ACUs. There will PT in the mornings followed by a 2-mile, 3-mile, 4-mile, and 6-mile ruck march prior to the final 12-miler. That's on top of the slingload inspections and rappelling.

    Airborne PT is much easier. They may or may not do a PT test, depending on the cadre and if students all have a valid PT card within 30 days. Long runs, and some time in the pit. Lots of time doing practical events like the swing-landing trainer, the 34-foot mock-exit tower and the big tower (though I have heard they're no longer using them).

    You may have the chance to do Pathfinder depending on slotting and successful completion of Air Assault. We had one cadet in our Pathfinder class. He failed out.

    If you can, try to get Airborne as a cadet. In the real Army, you won't get jump school unless you go to an airborne billet. You can always get air assault, though, as there are many AASLT satellite schools at different posts.

    And they're called Skill Badges. The Girl Scouts wear pins. :thumb:
     
  4. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Son is graduating from ABN this week- I agree with all of above- he's rather disappointed at how easy ABN was (other than the heat at Ft Benning in July)- but I think that has been the case for a long time- at least since 1977. I recall AASLT as being much more rigorous- we used to roadmarch around the old Clarksville Base and it was a fast roadmarch.
    They are not using the 250 ft towers anymore- too bad- that was way scarier to me than the jumps ever were:rolleyes:
     
  5. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Yes, the AASLT road march is fast and hilly. Back in the day it was ALICE ruck and LCE. Now it's a full pack with body armor plus DAPS and kit. Ouch.

    Airborne isn't big on PT, but that's not too big a deal. The focus us on training you to jump safely. If you pass the initial PT test with pullups, then the focus should be on training.
     
  6. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    Another program that is gaining emphasis/popularity is the cultural immersion programs. Our sophomores competed for these opportunities. We had a cadet visit Vietnam two years ago, PMS and one cadet visit Argentina last year, and this year we had cadets visit Taiwan, Tanzania, and Morocco.
     

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