Commissioning After Naval Academy

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by texan101, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. texan101

    texan101 Member

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    I have a question about the career commissioning after the Naval Academy. I found the list of who's going where (I hope this is accurate I found it online somewhere)

    Surface Warfare Officer 277
    Submarines 120
    Navy Pilot 234
    Naval Flight Officer 85
    USMC 273
    SEALs 27
    Special Ops 14
    Oceanography 1
    Supply Corps 5
    Medical Corps 15
    Information Warfare 3
    Intelligence 3
    Civil Eng Corps 3

    Does anyone know how many people wanted to be Navy Pilots or Marine Pilots but didn't get that assignment and instead got their second choice? I guess what I'm really asking is, in reality how hard is it to get a Navy or Marine Corps pilot slot?
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Pilot slots are both easier and harder now that eye surgery is available. Easier in that people who previously couldn't be a pilot b/c they didn't have 20/20 vision can now (in most cases, not all) have corrective surgery. However, more difficult because a lot more people are now eligible to fly.

    How difficult it is in any given year will obviously depend on the number of billets vs. the number who are eligible to fly and want to fly. The biggest single factor in your ability to get the assignment you want is your class standing. The higher your class rank, the more options you have. I believe (and I'm sure a current mid/parent will correct me if I'm wrong) that there is also a "suitability" interview or something like that where the warfare community ensures they want you.

    Bottom line is that the "needs of the Navy" always come first. Some people will become physically disqualified while at USNA. Even if you stand #1 in your class and have perfect vision, you aren't "guaranteed" of being a pilot. The lower in your class that you stand, the less choice you are likely to have. And, it sounds obvious but 20% of the class is really in the bottom 20% of the class. No one thinks it will be him/her, but it is someone.

    So, if all you want to do is fly, consider what you will do if you can't.
     
  3. wannabe2013

    wannabe2013 Member

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    On my CVW the said the only interview for a community was for subs...but that might just be the only interview with an admiral...
     
  4. texan101

    texan101 Member

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    So are the chances pretty slim of getting a pilot slot if you are in the bottom 20%? I've talked to my BGO and he said that of course the higher your class rank the better chance you have. However he also said as long as you're not the at the very bottom and don't get in any trouble at the academy that you have a good chance. How true is this?

    Also I don't know too much about commissioning but if you put Navy Pilot as your first choice can you put Marine Corps Pilot as your second choice.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    You're really going to need a current/recent mid or maybe parent to answer these questions as the intricacies of service selection have changed over time and I don't want to provide inaccurate information.

    From what I understand from Shipmate (the alum magazine), 1/C choose their warfare specialities (subs, NFO, USMC) in October and choose platforms/class dates in Jan or Feb. In my day, it was a one-shot deal in late January -- so things do change.

    In the "old" days, the Marines would guarantee you a pilot billet if you were qualified (and there were still USMC slots available to the class). That resulted in more than a few people becoming Marine pilots who wanted to be a pilot a lot more than they wanted to be a Marine. Thus, I BELIEVE (and thus could be wrong), that USMC and USNA do more today to ensure men & women want to be Marine Corps officers first and foremost. However, I will acknowledge I don't know the details of how this is done today.

    As for being in the bottom 20% of your class -- you take your chances. I'm sure many of those folks do get their first choice but, as with most things in the military and life, the better you do/higher you stand, the better off you will be and the more choices you will have. In that regard, USNA is no different than most organizations.
     
  6. kaullman

    kaullman Member

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    Class of 2007 Info

    Hey, if a BGO says it, of course it's true...lol

    Your service selection numbers are in the ballpark. I know that they are close to the C/o 2005, 2008 and 2009 numbers.

    As my DD (class of '07) approached service selection, she and her classmates had a very good idea where they needed to be in the class to be able to select for pilot. However, the class of 2009 had some folks selected into Submarines to fill USN requirements.

    Maybe someone else can help with this one...
     

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