Dislocated shoulder

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by usarmystrong97, Apr 22, 2014.

  1. usarmystrong97

    usarmystrong97 Member

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    Could a dislocated shoulder keep someone from service in the military, more specifically the army? If it does is it difficult to get a waiver for that?

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  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    It's possible it could be a DQ without waiver. It's also possible you could get a waiver or not even be DQ'ed. Each individual case is different and the only way to know for sure is to apply.
     
  3. usarmystrong97

    usarmystrong97 Member

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    Could surgery on it completely dq someone? Or would it make it better?

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  4. Dad

    Dad Member

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    Consider contacting DoDMERB directly at helpdesk@dodmerb.tma.osd.mil. They will have a better answer than anyone here. Best wishes.
     
  5. JMS

    JMS Member

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    I'm thinking that if dislocations or other orthopedic injuries were a big problem, the academies would not likely be able to admit any athletes. So, if the injury has not limited the applicant in a permanent way, I suspect it will not be a problem.
    You do not say where you are in the process of being an applicant or how old your injury is. If you are a Jr in HS, it is very different than if you are a Sr and reporting in July. In any case, I would think hard about surgery and pay attention to what the downside can be. You should decide based on the best medical option for your situation. I would not let the military thing figure into the surgery decision at all.
    Regards your question about surgery causing a 'complete DQ or making it better'.... I say 'Yes.' .... and by that I mean, no one will know the answer until months after your decision to have, or not have, surgery.
     
  6. usarmystrong97

    usarmystrong97 Member

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    I should have mentioned that I am a junior and dislocated it around 3 weeks ago. I was talking to the doctor and she said that with all the athletes that go to the academies there is bound to be more people with dislocations that they accept.

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  7. JMS

    JMS Member

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    Sounds like you have lots of time before you should be considering surgery. Listen to your Dr. and parents. Your body's largest organ spends all of its time keeping bad things out. Surgery defeats that protection. That is why all the emphasis on sterile procedures. The downside to a surgical procedure gone bad can be very grim.
    Oh, and while I'm going on about protection, if your screen name approximates your real name, you may wish to consider selecting a different screen name.
     
  8. cb7893

    cb7893 Member

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    Let me give you my personal experience with surgery and with DoDMERB.

    I had the surgery in 1979 after three dislocations. The surgery was performed by one of the developers of the procedure. At that time, most surgeons were still using pins. Those who got the pins definitely had reduced range of motion. At that time, orthos seemed more reluctant to cut. Mine wanted to see a pattern and considered surgery a last resort. I knew kids who figured out to reduce (relocate) their own shoulders.

    Within a couple of years I stopped worrying about the shoulder popping out and have stayed relatively active over the years. I have total range of motion and as part of a regular workout regime, I do push-ups and pull-ups to the point of exhaustion.

    You will have the advantage of a smaller scar and infinitely better follow-up physical therapy than I had.

    DS #2 applied for NROTC scholarship in Nov of senior year. Was hit in the eye with a soccer ball Thanksgiving week. Immediately saw optho. There was trauma to the eye, but no surgery. Treatment was to avoid any possible eye trauma for one year. No LAX, no sledding, no skiing.

    DS received scholarship notification in Feb. Immediately started DoDMERB. Passed all aspects of physical. In April, received request for more info about the eye. In May, informed he needed waiver for the eye, which would not be granted at the earliest, until Optho cleared him. The Optho said one year from date of injury, but ended up 14 months after injury.

    I am no physician but the constant theme with DoDMERB is they do not want anyone with a medical condition which would disqualify the candidate or create a financial liability for the military later. Ergo, if you have an injury, you must be fully recovered. A dislocated, unrepaired shoulder would be suspect. If you have/had surgery, you must be fully recovered, which means it would take potentially months after the surgery to determine if there was full recovery.

    As Ortho if he/she has any experience with military or DoDMERB.

    Bottomline, if you get the surgery, get it sooner rather than later in order to be fully recovered.

    Best of luck!
     
  9. Dad

    Dad Member

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    While it is always wise to seek information others others with similar experience, injuries are typically unique to each individual. What works for 1 shoulder may not work for a different shoulder. Please be careful when considering medical advice from an anonymous forum. I certainly do not want to discount the value of hearing what others did for their specific injuries in any way. However, you can't discern the variations between individuals' injuries via text. Use the helpdesk at DoDMERB for recommendations on progressing through the qualification process and your health care professional regarding treatments.

    Best wishes. :thumb:
     
  10. pointguard

    pointguard Member

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    DS had a Subluxation/Dislocation of the left shoulder in Sept of 11th grade. Played through 3 more Dislocations to attend winter College Showcases, finishing up in March of 11th grade. Applied to USAFA-2018 in the summer between junior and senior year, when time for DODMERB came around he was an Auto-DQ, their words. He was told to contact DODMERB when the Orthopaedic Surgeon cleared him 100%, and otherss said its best to have that clearance well in advance of the following June, which DS did by having Full Clearance in Oct of Senior Year. He got the Waiver post-Clearance, and has had no issues with the shoulder. The shoulder was suspect in his case till the Shoulder Surgery. It popped out lifting weights, couldn't really do pull/push up's, and range of motion was limited. All went away with surgery. The problem with not getting the surgery is that each time it 'pops out' bleeding is caused internally and the labrum may tear a little more each time. At least that is what our national expert surgeon said. I saw the MRI photo's showing 4 notches on his bones from the 4 dislocations, the bloody sac, and a very torn Labrum. FYI
     
  11. cb7893

    cb7893 Member

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    Almost the exact words from my ortho, who did not have the benefit of an MRI. My first dislocation was fall of 1973. Surgery came six years later after the third event.
     
  12. pointguard

    pointguard Member

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    Also important to note, the recovery time AFTER surgery(which takes a month to schedule for a good surgeon) is 6 months standard for this injury. Other than walk/ride a bike, DS could do literally nothing for the first 1-2 months, then could jog a little, then run pretty good after 4 months, but the Surgeon said all along, and did not sign off, it was going to be 6 months. Took DS another 2-4 months to get back up to speed physically. At the 6 month mark he was only able to get 13 pull-ups and 55 push-ups on his CFA last October after surgery April 10th a year ago. He's doing perfectly well now, and the most important thing about the surgery was: he never worries about it popping out again, or being injured further. That alone is worth it to him, BCT in June is going to be rough enough!
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2014

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