DODMERB Physical Question

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Ctorch, May 30, 2014.

  1. Ctorch

    Ctorch Member

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    So I went to my DODMERB physical today, and the doctor who examined me could not have cared any less about the exam, he spent all of 7-8 minutes with me total.

    I was wrongly diagnosed with Asthma by my pediatrician years ago, but when I went to a actual pulmonologist, I was totally cleared by him, and I have the paperwork/tests/doctor's letter to back it up. The problem is that the doctor didn't even look at the paperwork, and just said that it was resolved, and moved on from the asthma. Is there a way to ensure that DODMERB knows that I was cleared by the pulmonologist, and get the paperwork to them? I expect to get a remedial, but I do not want to be DQ'd for something I never had, just because the doctor couldn't be bothered to make a note that I had been cleared by the pulmonologist.
     
  2. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    I'm trying to think back to when DD filled out the DoDMERB forms. On the form, did you note that you had been incorrectly diagnosed with asthma but eventually cleared? If so, I wouldn't worry about it. Even if DQ-ed, if a SA decides you qualify, they will request a waiver and you can present the paperwork. You may not even get that far -- they may just ask for a remedial & you can send in the paperwork.

    One word of advice, try to do this all before November "before the DoDMERB rush." This was the advice DD received from DoDMERB and she had a waiver in Oct or Nov from 2 different SAs.
     
  3. Angel72

    Angel72 Member

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    My son recently went for his physical last week and it went pretty fast as well. He identified a history of shell fish allergies and the doctor simply asked him what type of reaction he had and how did he know he had such an allergy. Qhen checking status it states under DoDMERB review.
     
  4. Mandyj34

    Mandyj34 Member

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    I honestly wouldn't worry. The doctors job in examining you isn't to go over your whole medical history. They read everything that you filled out online, and if they have any questions they ask. You probably just explained yourself enough in all the paperwork they didn't have any questions.

    If DoDMERB does catch it and give you a remedial just send in the paperwork and hope they remove it. That's all you really can do.
     
  5. Angel72

    Angel72 Member

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    Status now changed to Remedial Requested. They have also stated that my son has a color deficiency and pending DQ before waiver process. He has a physical on Monday and we'll get medical history then and also ask for a letter from doctor explaining that eczema isnt a current issue and has not been for several years. Now the concern is Waiver getting approved after they impose the DQ for color deficiency. Can anyone provide me with information on those chances?

    R270.00 Provide copies of all medical records regarding shellfish allergy.
    R110.00 Provide all medical records regarding eczema
    R259.10 Applicant pending DQ for color vision deficiency , must complete remedial(s) before waiver processing may be considered
     
  6. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    depends on if they passed vivid red/green and what branch....
    I think you guys are NROTC...that is rough.
     
  7. Angel72

    Angel72 Member

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    Yes my son is NROTC. How rough? I know there are issues if he were to want to be a pilot. But that isn't the case at all. He was awarded a Tier 3. So what are the chances on waiver? Will they make him take the Falant test?
     
  8. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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  9. ianthony345

    ianthony345 USMC FCB Awardee '14

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    NROTC is rough with waivers from my experience. I was DQ'ed due to my vision not meeting 20/20 and for my astigmatism. Waiver denied. Lost my NROTC scholarship :frown: But I hope all goes well for you! Every situation is different!
     
  10. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    Don't panic. Just be sure to send in all the requested information. If you can get a doctor (or better yet, a specialist) to write a note, it would help. Each case is thoroughly reviewed and individually assessed. I don't think it's any tougher with Navy than it is for Air Force. It will come down to how severe the color deficiency is.
     
  11. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    +1 don't panic, just methodically take care of each detail.

    Actually, interestingly air force has no restrictions on color deficiency (not talking about being ok'd for being a pilot, just about getting into air force academy or AFROTC.) Army you only need to pass vivid red/green (again not talking about being cleared to fly). Because of the water CG and Navy are stricter. I dont recall Marines. I dont know MM but I would assume it is the same as Navy and CG. Each academy/ROTC commissioning source has different vision restrictions. It is indeed harder to get into some than others.
     
  12. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    :thumb: Yeah, I was thinking AF pilot requirements. I get a little narrow focused since DD wants to fly.
     
  13. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    The AF may have an easier commissioning standard when it comes to color vision. But once in, the number of eligible career fields slims down considerably - and it's not just for pilots. A number of my friends found that out the hard way when they were tested after commitment and told, "BTW, you can't fly, get in an airplane, or do any of this list of jobs. Good luck." You become pigeonholed into a small set of support career fields. Even better, there are many people on the aviation side that the AF will DQ but the Navy/Army will take in a heartbeat due to different color vision testing standards.
     

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