Dyslexia Waiver

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Falcon2018, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. Falcon2018

    Falcon2018 New Member

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    Hello, I have just been notified that I am medically disqualified because of my dyslexia. It has never been a problem for me before but I had to disclose it during the physical. I have received a principal nomination from Congressman Runyan's office and been selected for early action by the US Air Force Academy. If anyone has any contact information on someone to contact to help me with this please let me know.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
  2. usafmk95

    usafmk95 Member

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    Usually you can contact the person assigned to you on the bottom of your disqualifications letter and they will answer any questions you have. Their "final" decision isn't always final - you can still try to prove your case on your own. I would work with DoDMERB though. They are the ones with the reliable answers.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Chris,

    1st thing you may want to do is to edit your signature line on this site....now typically smart to place your full name, email and phone number as a signature. If someone wants to discuss this privately they will pm you directly from here.

    Now on topic.

    Dyslexia is very hard to get a waiver for when it comes to the military, mainly due to the fact that the majority of jobs will require coordinates, and numbers. Plus, the military is currently downsizing, and I would bet my beloved Myrtle that if they waive it will be for only non-rated positions, which is where they are cutting currently.

    DoDMERB's job is only to qualify or disqualify according to the regs set forth by the commissioning source (AFA). They have no voice in the waiver process. It is the AFA that will determine if they will waive the medical disqualification.

    I would get any medical records in order from the doc that diagnosed you with dyslexia to submit if you can. I would inform your ALO, and see if they can find out where to send them on the AFA side for a waiver while you find out where to submit on the DoDMERB side, this way both sides have the same paperwork, JIC DoDMERB's copy gets lost.
     
  4. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Not THAT hard to get a waiver for (from personal experience). As with any waiver, it's up to the service and its needs.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    LITS,

    I will bow to you regarding how hard to get a waiver for dyslexia. Sure, certain medical issues are easily waived, but others not so much. I.E. USNA color deficiency issues @2% are waived for USNA, but for USMA and AFA, the waiver is not that hard. However, I think we are both on the same page, and it is up to the needs of the service.

    Currently, the AF is allowing AFROTC 14 cadets to walk, including scholarship recipients; and if they don't make their numbers, they will be doing a version of a RIF. The AFROTC cadets that graduated in May, and have yet to report can also walk, if they don't they too maybe facing a RIF.

    Waivers in my opinion, are not a dime a dozen anymore. The OP has a prin. nom. thus, that is going for them, but....

    DQ is not just about them alone. It is about being able to do the mission. The impact on those that must fill any position if they are not qual'd. The fact that they are accepting from a health care/insurance perspective a pre-existing condition.

    I am not trying to be Debbie Downer, but let's be honest LITS. You entered the USCGA in 01/02? A totally different world regarding the DoD budget than we are facing currently. The ADAF has to trim @7% of their personnel in the next few yrs.
    ~~~ They may be jokingly called the chair force, but if the candidate cannot go rated, than this might be an issue. You can take a pilot and make them a Maintenance officer with no additional cost. You can't take a Maintainer and make them a pilot without millions of dollars and yrs of training to just become MQ. Who do you think they will cut 1st? The pilot or the PA?

    Just my opinion, that and $1.86 will get you a cup of Starbucks coffee.

    In the end you have to go through the process. Nobody here is DoDMERB related, our opinions are just that opinions.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  6. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    I entered CGA in 2002. Very different budget climate then. But also more applicants. I got a waiver from USCGA, USNA and USMMA. I'm not saying you won't get the always-saddening DODMERB letters, but dyslexia isn't one of those huge issues. Many people have compensated for their dyslexia after years of dealing with it, doesn't mean they don't still flip things.. just that they're able to work through it easier.
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Hence, why I said they may qual him in the end, but probably for non-rated. Flipping a coordinate while in combat rarely works out in a positive result iIMPO. Remember, I am just a spouse, and now a Mom of a UPT student. Things happen quickly in in aircraft...they do tend to turn faster than a boat :wink:

    If the OP wants rated, than this is something they need to delve deeper into regarding chances. In that case, I would refer them to baseops.net because they may give them more info regarding DoDMERB and flyin, especially the FC1 physical.

    If his goal is non-rated, than I agree; his chances rise, especially as a prin. nom.

    It is just going to be a path he must go through, and right now, it would be best for him to get his primary doc paperwork in order to create a medical defense that this is not an issue.
     

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