Education Delay for Physical Therapy

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Navyman, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. Navyman

    Navyman Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    My daughter is a junior in high school contemplating ROTC but wants to become a Physical Therapist. Do the Army, AF and Navy all offer education delay for pursuit of the DPT? I know the Army does but not sure about others? If the other services offer it, are there differences in the way each service implements the program (do all services consider them commissioned officers while in grad school, same benefits, same additional service commitment, etc.) If anyone can give details on the process, specifically for PT, I would appreciate it. How competitive are these slots? Do those accepted all go to the Baylor Army DPT program or can they choose any program to which they are accepted? Thanks so much for any information.
     
  2. Navyman

    Navyman Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    We really would appreciate any information. She wants to serve her country and fully understands she will do so pursuant to the needs of the service. She is looking at all the various career paths each branch offers to prepare herself when the time comes if she does not get her first choice or if she changes her mind as to seeking to pursue a physical therapy degree. I just want to make sure she has all of the necessary information as the process moves forward. Again, thank you for any assistance.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,810
    Likes Received:
    956
    The AF offers ED, but it is competitive, so I would say to her, be prepared for the what if?

    Additionally, many kids enter thinking they want a certain career, but once in the classes they realize it isn't for them. I would look into how easy it would be to get approval to change her major if on any ROTC scholarship. In AFROTC it would be hard to switch to let's say Psychology.

    I would also have her look into all types of career fields and lifestyle within each branch. Each branch is different, they are unique. Think of it like your family. Your kids all were raised by the same parents, but they are different.

    If I were you, I would do some school tours, and visit each det at those schools. She will be able to decide easier next yr. because she will have seen what the next 4 yrs in ROTC will be like. She will be able to see how often they give ED, and how the system works face to face.

    Call the dets. set up an apptmt., ask them to allow her to speak to some cadets in a medical major. They will be more than happy to do that, because they take pride in their units, and love to show how great their unit is compared to any other in the nation.
     
  4. Navyman

    Navyman Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks so much, Pima, for the very helpful advice. I have taken her on a number of college tours over the past year. However, at the time of those tours (most were during Spring Break of her sophomore year), she was thinking more along the lines of military nursing, which would have been a much easier process than physical therapy. When she was interested more in nursing, she had several interviews with Navy ROTC units at those schools. We have not been on a tour of the school which she now thinks is her top choice, so if I can get her there, she will likely schedule a meeting with each of the ROTC branches, and maybe some students, to discuss the process and alternatives. Thanks again! Anything else?
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,810
    Likes Received:
    956
    My only suggestion would be is if they give numbers, and not percentages, ask them to convert it into percentages too.

    For example, not her major/career field, but to illustrate how you have to look at the big picture every which way.

    ERAU tells AFROTC candidates that they give out the most rated slots to their grads, only after the AFA.

    This is true. However, because they have such a large det., the % of cadets that get rated are not as high as VT, and is only equivalent to the national avg, hence the amount is great, but statistically not any better, and in the case of VT, worse than other colleges an applicant might like more.

    A det may say they have 100% get ED, yet only had 1 apply, while another will say 6 got it, but maybe 10 applied.

    For me as a parent that would make me ask a follow up question.

    Percentage of cadets/mids that enter as a freshman and commission. Maybe the 100% has a higher drop rate than the other school.

    This matters because at a certain point if she is scholarship she has to commit.

    I hope that helps.

    PS: I would also investigate the scholarship system, and if her #1 school is a host or a xtown unit.

    AFROTC is the only branch that the scholarship is tied to the cadet and their major, not the det.

    AF/NROTC give more scholarships to tech majors

    A/NROTC tie the scholarship to the college, but there isn't the Type system like AFROTC (Type 1 any college, no limit tuition; Type 2 limit to 18K, you can pay the difference; Type 7 IS cost only, and you cannot pay the difference)

    AFROTC no SFT (soph yr) no commissioning and dis-enrolled.

    You are in a great place right now because she is a jr. Take the time and investigate everything. There are good and bad issues with each of them.
     
  6. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,234
    Likes Received:
    5
    If I really wanted a DPT I would avoid ROTC and just finish school. After getting your DPT you can always direct commission and get your loans paid back. Doing ROTC Ed delay is a big unnecessary risk.
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,547
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    A reasonable alternative plan.

    I have a nephew who is currently completing the final year of his DPT. Here's the route he took.
    1. Enlisted National Guard and went thru all his training. (Aside: while in training was offered appointment to West Point but declined it... sometimes I wonder how smart he is_.
    2. Got his BA (Sports Medicine or something like that) on the GI Bill while still training monthly and summers in National Guard.
    3. After completing BA deployed to Iraq for a year. (I think it just worked out this way).
    4. Doing his DPT on loans and is up to his eyeballs in debt (Glad to here there is some payback mechanism although I no nothing of the details... and he may have burned this bridge using the GI Bill for BA). Still do NG training and keeps managing to land extended summer training/duty to help cover bills.
    5. When he finishes this spring he plans on going Active Duty and commissioning as a Captain.

    So there is more than one way to skin this cat.
     
    Dckc88 and drewDub6 like this.
  8. Navyman

    Navyman Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2007
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is all great information! She understands that taking this route is a big risk which is why she is looking at altenative career paths in the service in the event she is not selected o changes her mind about DPT school. She can always do her time and pay for the DPT afterward if necessary if that is still what she wants to do. Her #1 choice for undergrad schools is also one that we cannot afford so the ROTC route will allow for her to attend there if she's admitted. She has a lot of research to do before applications are due to know if she is making the right choices for her. The risks associated are certainly among the considerations she will have to factor in.
     
  9. philmont

    philmont Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2010
    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    4
    This is true. If her primary goal is DPT she can try to direct commission during or as a graduate of any DPT program. Realizing though, this is competitive too. She will need to get her undergraduate degree, then apply for DPT program. She should pursue ROTC scholarship if her goal is to serve her country first and foremost.
     
  10. drewDub6

    drewDub6 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    So your nephew has no problems missing classes with the annual training? I am in ROTC right now and I would like to join the reserves after I graduate and I would like to go to DPT school while in the reserves but I am afraid of missing classes because of annual training.
     
  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,547
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    No problem. That was an old post. He has graduated no and continued to get his doctorate. Still serving in the Guard but did not go active duty.
     

Share This Page