Expeditionary, Survival and Evasion Training (ESET)

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by Non Ducor Duco, Apr 14, 2015.

  1. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    This summer HQ is sending a number of AFROTC AS300s to the Air Force Academy for Expeditionary, Survival and Evasion Training (ESET). As I understand it, this is something all Academy cadets go through so I figured someone on this board would be able to answer some questions I have about it. What will we be learning and what is the environment like? Is it a training environment or is it going to be like Field Training all over again? I have a slot so I'm just wondering what to expect.
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Can't speak from personal experience but I did locate the following info which might be helpful:
    (from here: http://www.academyadmissions.com/the-experience/military/officer-development/)

    Google knows all!
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2015
  3. USAFADAD2017

    USAFADAD2017 Member

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    My C3C went through ESET last summer. Rained the whole time she was in the field. Wasn't fun.. I would describe it as surviving "hide and go seek on steroids" and how to cook a bunny rabbit. Seriously, you should learn survival skills I hope you never have to use.
     
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  4. RedDragon

    RedDragon Member

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    I believe all USAFA cadets go through this between C4C and C3C summers. DS has it the first three week session, followed by 3 weeks leave and then 3 weeks glider soaring training. Other cadets will have jump or something else(Cyber?) instead of soaring. Have heard the same rabbit story as well from others...
     
  5. afrotc16

    afrotc16 Member

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    That's really cool, and I never heard anything about it! Hmmm I wonder if just some of the detachments got slots or something. I'm also studying abroad at the moment so maybe I'm just out of the loop...
     
  6. zachtx

    zachtx Member

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    I went through it last year, and while it changes from year to year, the gist is the same... You learn a lot of small unit type tactical skills: land nav, mout, patrolling, ambushing, evasion, etc. There's a little bit of classroom time, but the majority of the program is out in Jack's. You get to qualify on M9s, go through the MOUT village, run around the woods with blanks, crawl around and hope no one sees you, etc. And the it ends with an evasion exercise that lasts a couple days. It's a very relaxed training environment, taught almost entirely by cadets. No yelling or anything like that. A lot of hurry up and wait and a lot of MREs.
     
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  7. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    Each detachment gets 1 slot, if a Det doesn't use the slot it goes unused. Only 300s could apply. This only came down a month ago and the suspense was for March 30. I hope it's a good sign that ROTC cadets may get to do more summer training. I'd love to do the Jump school if they open that back up to us.

    Afrotc16,

    I feel like we might have met this summer. I was Max 5, Squadron 8, female.
     
  8. baileydb

    baileydb Member

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    I heard a rumor that during this training, they give you a little bunny rabbit and you have to hold it and then calm it down and then kill it and eat it. Is that true??
     
  9. zachtx

    zachtx Member

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    Yes, you learn how to kill, dress, and cook rabbits and chickens.
     
  10. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    Yah, there's a tradition that goes with that bunny story, but I don't want to ruin it for anyone. :p

    When my husband went through, they had to kill the bunny, but he told me another group got a cow. So, you never know what's going to happen.
     
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  11. baileydb

    baileydb Member

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    I really wouldn't mind killing an animal, I've always wanted to go hunting, but the rumor I heard was that you had to strangle the rabbit (my apologies for being so morbid). That would be hard to do :(
     
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  12. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    I think my husband said he hit it on the head with a rock. Knocked it out quickly.
    The chicken would be easier to wring. My grandmother grew up on a farm and that was just something you did if you wanted to eat. Don't look at it like a warm fuzzy animal -- its food. :) You'll be hungry enough by that time that it won't be so hard to do.
     
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  13. zachtx

    zachtx Member

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    Normally you hold it upside down and club it in the back of the head...but the SERE Specialist also taught us how to break it's neck with a karate chop.
     
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  14. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

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    My son was cadre for CST or Combat Survival Training (what this training was called at the time). He was actually one of the guys who taught the part about dispatching the rabbit. The main thing that he said they taught was how to do it quickly and quietly. Remember in the situation that you are training for there are probably bad guys looking for you and you don't want a squealing bunny drawing attention to your location.

    Stealth_81
     
  15. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Bullet was in charge of the bunny. He still smiles about that poor little thing :yikes:

    Just glad we didn't have bunnies for pets when the kids were little otherwise I am not sure how long the bunny would have survived if I didn't have what Bullet wanted for dinner! ;)
     
  16. Blueblood1

    Blueblood1 Member

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    I guess I'm getting old. No more SERE? No longer supposed to resist?
     
  17. BlahuKahuna

    BlahuKahuna Member

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    Correct. They leave that part to the training some of us will receive on active duty.
     
  18. Cannonball

    Cannonball Member

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    This sounds like good training. Does everyone get to do it or is it like soaring where some do it and others do something else?
     
  19. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    They all do it.
     
  20. zachtx

    zachtx Member

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    People who's duties place them at risk for capture (aircrew, special operations, etc) go through the full SERE course at Fairchild. Not every cadet needs it. But everyone does get the privilege of going through ESET (graduation requirement), with the exception of the international cadets.
     

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