Graduate school?

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by Coltron, Dec 26, 2013.

  1. Coltron

    Coltron Candidate

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    Is there opportunities for graduates of a service academy to go to a graduate school? I know that they sponsor some cadets to go to medical school, but that doesn't really apply to me. I also heard that there is a program that they will pay from your grad school, but only upon completion of your 5 year commitment, and in return you tack on extra years to your contract. This doesn't work for me, as I fear that 5 years will be a long intermission from school. Computer Science material becomes outdated in 5 years, so this will not work to my benefit, and MIT (or whatever grad school) may look at a 5 year break negatively.

    However, is it possible for one to attend grad school right after the academy? Say, if I was accepted into a grad program at MIT after a service academy, could I attend, and if so, would the military help pay for it? I can't find any information on this subject anywhere else, so any help would be much appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Hornet and Christcorp (Rand Fellowship for a ph.D) can give a great detail on this issue, but meanwhile, here are two of the Rhodes scholars for 2014 that are coming from an SA.

    Calla Glavin, Birmingham, Mich., U. S. Military Academy: When Glavin learned the Rhodes news, her first call was to her mentor, Army Maj. Keith Benedict, a former Rhodes scholar who taught at West Point and urged her to apply.
    ~Glavin plans to pursue a Master's degree in applied statistics at Oxford.

    Erin A. T. Mauldin, Albuquerque, N.M., U. S. Military Academy: Mauldin ranks first in her class academically and second in academics, military leadership and athletics combined. She is the only non-French woman ever to graduate from the French Commando School.
    ~She plans to earn her Master's in nature, science and environmental policy at Oxford.


    You need to research a little deeper under ED.

    OBTW it is very competitive to get one of these ED slots. Plus, nobody here knows what the DoD budget will be like in 5 yrs from now regarding how much money they will have available for ED.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  3. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    I don't know how USMA and USAFA do it. At USNA those opportunities usually go away past about #50 on the order of merit, and candidates for that sort of thing are culled from the rest of the mouthbreathing herd (like me!) very early on.
     
  4. Coltron

    Coltron Candidate

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    Pima, I did not really understand anything you just said. (Sorry...) What is a ED slot? Are Rhodes scholars the only ones who get to attend grad school directly after the academy?

    Hurricane12, thanks for the help! So the top 50 generally get to attend graduate school? Is this paid for? And do they get to select what university?

    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  5. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    Again, this is just USNA. Not sure how USMA/USAFA does it.

    No, the number of those chosen from USNA to attend grad school is usually less than 50, the majority of which do VGEP--they validate enough classes to start grad school second semester 1/C year and finish it a semester after graduation. A couple others do IGEP, where they're given a year or two after graduation to go to a civilian university (guys from my class are at Princeton and Harvard, for example) and get a master's. And a few a year go to the UK as Rhodes/Marshall/whatever scholars.

    There are people who probably "could" be eligible for these programs and don't do them. For those going aviation, for example, tacking on two years of grad school to their training pipeline means they wouldn't get to the real Navy/USMC until at least four or five years into commissioned service.

    I'm honestly not sure about the funding...some programs are funded, and I think some are not (fully) funded. In both the Navy and Marine Corps there are opportunities later on for grad school as well, so it's not like if you miss that shot right out of the gate you're screwed.

    As a reality check, these are not really things to pin your hopes on. If you were to ask an incoming class how many of them thought they would graduate in the top 100 at USNA, probably 90% would say they could do it. These things are nice to know about, but at the end of the day a good number of that class will walk across the stage at commissioning just relieved they made it.
     
  6. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    From the Coast Guard Academy, there are very few opportunities directly after you graduate, for graduate school. But after that initial tour, there are a number of opportunities. If you do it through a service program, it's paid for, if not, it will depend on if you pursue any programs that support a graduate degree (like the post-9/11 GI Bill).
     
  7. Coltron

    Coltron Candidate

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    Thanks for the help! I searched more on USMA's site and found an article hidden somewhere that clarifies. "a new program offers cadets the choice of graduate school, branch or post options in exchange for three more years
    of active duty service. Class of 2006 cadets said they are happy that they can continue their education at universities like Harvard, Stanford, MIT or Princeton
    and still serve in the Army."

    It seems like this is exactly what I was looking for. In the years past they didn't even fill up all their slots for graduate school, so it looks like I may be able to get graduate school at MIT paid for (if the planets align and everything goes as planned) if I make it into USMA.
     
  8. Invisibility

    Invisibility Member

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    I don't know specifics, but there are opportunities from USAFA for both civilian institutions (including MIT) and AFIT. Most are for a master's degree. You have to have a very high GPA to have a shot at it, and there are more opportunities for techies. Certain majors (math, comp engr, aero) use that as a selling point to attract cadets. Comp Sci I didn't get that impression, but that doesn't mean they don't send people to grad school.
     
  9. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    ED= Educational Delay.

    IOWs your 1st assignment will be to attend a grad school. As stated for AF, there are varying programs, one is AFIT. AFIT is a yr long program at Wright Pat. Your job is to attend grad school at Wright Pat. They pick up the cost and pay your O1 salary. When you commission you will already know what your follow on assignment is upon completion.

    There are many types of ED programs, anywhere from grad to med to law. Each one will have a specific aspects, but they are all insanely competitive.

    Just want to point out one thing you posted:
    1. You are talking about TA, and you don't have to wait for 5 yrs to use TA. Many start before 5 yrs. The commitment is concurrent.

    2. What do you actually think you will be doing when you go AD? Not work in computers? Your logic does not work. If you go for your grad degree right out of college than by the time you are 28 you are outdated even if you work in computers according to your logic.
    ~ Now if you are saying you don't intend to work in your major, i.e. become a pilot, thus need to do it right off the bat, than again that makes no sense because your commitment for UPT is 10 yrs upon winging.

    I would also say that you are also placing the cart before the horse, because this is going to be 4 yrs from now, many find themselves academically burnt out come commissioning. You also do not know yet which commissioning route you will be going. Do you have an appointment yet? If so, than I would be looking more closely at that branches ED opportunities. If not, I would also be looking at your plan B, assuming it is ROTC because their system maybe a little different than an SA ED.
     
  10. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Nothing like explaining an acronym by introducing other acronyms!

    I don't know the other Air Force specific acronyms, but TA is tuition assistance.
     
  11. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    It's good to have goals, but there are a lot of IFs in that sentence. IF you get an appointment and IF you are at the top of your graduating class and IF you are still interested in a graduate degree in 4.5 years and IF you are accepted into MIT and IF the military thinks it's in their best interest for you to go to grad school, then you might accomplish this goal. Do you have a plan B IF one of these things doesn't pan out? IF you want it badly enough, you might just make it happen. :smile:
     
  12. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    LMAO LITS.

    You are right...my bad!
     
  13. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    OK, good questions, but let's keep the priorities in order!

    FIRST, you must be accepted into the commissioning program/school of your choice.

    SECOND, you need to excel in that program. That isn't as easy as it sounds, as most cadets were the "big fish" in their high school pond. Well, welcome to the new lake! I went to USAFA with almost a perfect 4.0 in high school. I entered assuming I would get at least a 3.5 freshmen year, then gauge how high I could get my GPA. :yllol: I managed to pull my GPA up to a 3.25 by graduation. My point is that assuming you'll remain in the top 10% with a new peer group of top 10% types is a dangerous assumption. You'll need to work hard to even be in a position to pursue grad school scholarships.

    THIRD, research your career choices and school opportunities when you meet people with knowledge of those things. (This site, is a mixed bag, in that regards. We're knowledgeable about SOME things!) When you get to an SA or ROTC det, start asking about how things work for different career fields and programs. Your plans will likely change over time, so get as much info as you can, and keep your options open.

    FOURTH....pursue your career and educational goals after graduation.
     
  14. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    You need to go to the bar at the top where you see there is a search button and type in graduate school. Myself and others have posted ad nauseum on this topic. Read all those threads on grad school first and then come back if your questions aren't answered. As others have stated, there's a lot you need to get through first to be qualified for those programs.
     
  15. Full Metal Bulldog

    Full Metal Bulldog Citadel Class of 2016

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    Not to get this thread too far off topic, but is it difficult to obtain a Master's Degree as a company grade officer on the military's dime in time for the field grade promotions where they are oh-so important?
     
  16. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    It's just time management to be honest...

    On topic: I'm seen some pretty solid advice. Focus on acceptance first, worry about grad school down the road.
     
  17. lotrjedi13

    lotrjedi13 _

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    Coltron,

    I am a Firstie at USMA that tried to attend graduate school after graduation. Below are West Point’s three current options for graduate school.

    Per Army regulations, cadets may only attend graduate school immediately after graduation if it is fully funded. There are three options available that meet that criterion:

    1) Win a Scholarship: Fulbright, Marshall, Mitchell, Rhodes, Gates-Cambridge, Rotary, Hertz, Churchill, East-West, and Lincoln Lab, National GEM Consortium, Naval Postrgraduate, and St. Andrew’s Society Fellowships/Scholarships are the opportunities for which USMA cadets currently compete. West Point selects cadets in their first semester, junior year to compete for the Marshall, Mitchell, Gates-Cambridge, St. Andrew's Society, and Rhodes Scholarships. Any cadet may apply and compete for the other scholarships listed. Some scholarships allow you to select university, some are for a specific university. For more info, check out AR 621-7 or the page below out, and If you have any questions about this option, PM me: http://www.usma.edu/excellence/sitepages/scholarships.aspx.

    2) Compete for Medical School: For my class, 20 slots were available for cadets to attend medical school immediately after graduation. To be selected, the cadet must have completed certain med-school track courses and complete an interview. The cadet must then successfully apply to a medical school of their choice, which is not usually a problem.

    3) Compete for Law School: I’m afraid I’m out of my depth here. I’m told this exists, but have never participated myself, known anyone who participated, or heard much about it.


    Most officers do not attend school after graduation. Broadly (with some gross generalization) there are three avenues to attend graduate school—usually 5-8 years after graduation.

    1) Army-Funded: AR 621-1 and AR 614-130 govern officer selection for fully-funded graduate school. The only guaranteed way to go to graduate school is to be selected as an instructor or TAC at USMA. Studying at foreign universities is not authorized.

    2) Olmstead Scholarship: Earn a graduate degree (24 mos) overseas.

    3) Pay for it yourself: The Army will not allow officers to ‘take time off” to go to grad school if it is self-funded. Officers who pay for grad school out-of-pocket do so concurrent with regularly serving on active duty. I suppose this is also an option immediately after graduation, though with BOLC, Ranger, etc., it’s probably not a realistic option.

    All of the six above options that are funded by the Army or a scholarship incur a three-to-one Additional Service Obligation (ADSO). This means that for every one day spent at graduate school, the officer adds three days to his or her service obligation. Big-picture, this comes out roughly six additional years’ service for a 24-mos degree program.

    In a previous post, you mentioned a Graduate School ADSO (GRADSO), which allows cadets to trade an additional three years of service for guaranteed Army grad school funding. This option is currently not offered. If it is offered again in the future, know that the graduate school funding is not usable immediately after graduation. It is generally used at the senior captain mark.
     
  18. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Like to clarify few things

    Not immediately after gradation

    Funded Legal Education Program Now Accepting Applications

    http://www.army.mil/article/65885/Funded_Legal_Education_Program_Now_Accepting_Applications/

    This program is open to commissioned officers in the rank of second lieutenant through captain. Applicants must have at least two but not more than six years of total active Federal service at the time legal training begins.


    There are other "guaranteed" way to go to graduate school other than being an instructor or TAC. Certain functional areas require graduate degrees.


    With part time or online degree programs, it's an option. But probably hard to do during "BOLC, Ranger." Some or at least one Captains Career Course (Engineer and University of Missouri) have partnerships with local universities to give Army officers credits for their maters degree program. Unless your parents are rich, paying for grad school out-of-pocket won't be easy. You can use Federal Tuition Assistance, but when you use it you incur certain ADOS.
     
  19. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    And we can't forget the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill.
     
  20. Coltron

    Coltron Candidate

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    Thank you everyone who responded with positive information regarding Graduate school. It had really helped me understand the process.
     

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