hearing loss

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by z1colt45, Jan 7, 2008.

  1. z1colt45

    z1colt45 New Member

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    I went to see the audiologist friday (4 Jan 08) for my hearing test and he failed my left ear for some frequency loss. He told me he would withhold my test results until I saw a ear, nose and throat doctor. I went and and saw the ENT today and he diagnosed me with otosclerosis and a 25-30% hearing loss in my left ear. I go back to the ENT on Thursday for a more comprehensive hearing test and further diagnosis. He told me upfront today that surgery would be the best option for the route i was going (ROTC). My question is that will this much of a hearing loss and the otosclerosis be a disqualifier for DODMERB? Or can the surgery waive that? Help me out please.
     
  2. RetNavyHM

    RetNavyHM USN (RET)

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    At this point in time you will have 2 possible disqualifications. The one I am sure of is for the osteosclerosis, the second that is possible is for hearing loss greater than the standards.

    If you undergo surgery, that will be also be a disqualification, but if it does take care of the osteosclerosis and improves your hearing to within limits it could possibly help in the waiver process.

    There is an item that you failed to mention in your post, the first is when are you applying to ROTC? This year? Next year?

    If you are applying for this year, I highly doubt you would be able to receive a waiver even if you underwent the surgery right now. If you were applying for next year, then the chances of a waiver would be higher.

    The number of disqualifications that you receive would not be the issue, the issue would be the medical conditions. So in your case, if you had the surgery, you would possibly have 3 disqualifications, but its the underlying condition that is the issue.

    I'm not 100% confidant that even if you underwent the surgery that you would be able to get a waiver. I am certain that with out the surgery that it would be VERY difficult to get a waiver.

    I am not here to make medical decisions for any one, or to advise anyone on what medical decisions they need to make. In your case I would sit down with your physician and go over ALL the options you have, to include the benefits and risks associated with having the surgery and not having the surgery. Have your parents there as well. Go into the meeting not looking at just ROTC, but at the rest of your life. This is something that could affect your quality of living. Make sure that your quality of living is taken care of before you look at what you want to do with that life.

    If you have any other questions please feel free to let me know.
     

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