How many actual "plates" did your eye color test have?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Maximus, Jul 25, 2008.

  1. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    My son just mentioned to me that he did not have 14 plates in his eye test and it was either 6 or 8 plates. How do they calculate that and is that how it's done? I'm talking about the PIP (Ishihara test)
     
  2. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    I will double check. The one that we use is 14
     
  3. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    Thanks, I've checked all over the web and the test is supposed to be the 14 plate test. My S says 8 plates maximum were shown to him.
     
  4. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    It may be that at eight plates he had already missed too many to pass the test. With the color plates you can miss 2 before failing, so if at 8 plates he had already missed 2 the tech may have simply stopped and reported the failure. They probably should have completed the test for completeness sake.
     
  5. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    I've thought of that too or maybe each plate is actually 2 plates (both eyes) and the first plate is the example test.
    They clearly wrote pass 2 and failed 12.

    This again is the classic example of never even suspecting a color deficiency as none has been a problem in the past or detected. From what we (wife has perfect color vision, I'm iffy) observe is he sees color normally except for the Ishahara test obviously...lol. Oh well, time will tell and it is what it is.
     
  6. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    I have actually administered the ishihara numerous times.... there are fourteen plates: the first plate is a green/orange plate that anybody who can see somewhere around 20/200 can read at the proper distance. This one is basically to ferret out people who may be trying to "fool the doctor." (Had a couple of those who were not so interested in being in the Navy anymore). From there it goes through 13 other plates that are variations of different color combinations with the last two being numbers on a gray background that most people easily get. Usually we flip through the book twice, once for each eye to make sure there aren't any discrepancies; however, I'm not sure the proper protocol for the DODMERB exam. They may just do it once with both eyes open.

    It is sometimes amazing at the various health conditions that can be discovered at a dodmerb exam. Sometimes it is the first full, in depth, physical exam a child has received looking for certain things. I don't know many routine physical exams that include hearing tests and color vision tests. There can even sometimes be things that don't show up on a DODMERB exam that are found once in service. Within the past several years I took care of a guy who had a pretty incredible heart defect that had gone unfound for over 20 years until he was admitted to the hospital for a completely different problem.

    Hopefully he will do well on the Farnswerth and this will be one little speed bump on the way. Don't feel alone in the situation though, there are many more in the same boat I'm sure.
     
  7. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    My son read your post, and said he did not have any plates that were with a gray background. Of that he is positive but...who knows, he may be color blind.

    I'll keep everyone here posted as we progress. My son and I both agree that being truly color blind should keep you off the bridge of a ship navigating. We do however disagree that if you want the Marine option, you should still be allowed to attend the United States Naval Academy.
     
  8. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    As stated previously, the Marine option is a viable one. The Office of Admissions isbest suited to provided the most current and correct information as to how that option works.:thumb:
     

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