How many first gen./not-English-at-home mids from USNA.... How do I finish that?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by ESLGuy, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. ESLGuy

    ESLGuy Member

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    Well, how many midshipmen that were first generation American, or didn't speak English at home (or both) accomplished something.... Something like becoming the CNO, or being in charge of the Pacific Fleet, etc? I'm guilty of bringing this up before, but all the candidates I hear about are Americans that speak English at home. Sure, their skin color might be different, but they are "real" Americans. I was born in the USA, but I don't feel like an American, yet I dont even get minority status. I'm first gen and my family doesn't speak English at home. I was told the background checks on my parents would be more extensive, haha.

    Now, I have heard that there are some mids that fit my description, but do they go on to have average careers, or do they accomplish something above ordinary? Most of the "great" Naval Officers I have heard about are true Americans. I didn't find any examples of those that aren't. The reason I want to go to USNA is because I have been told they do the best job of preparing officers for the fleet, and I want to make the Navy my career. I know they don't descriminate, but when I look at the statistics I'm not reassured. *sigh* If only I had been a 5th gen American...
     
  2. esu8

    esu8 Member

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    2nd Generation

    Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz was a second generation American who was raised by his German born Grandfather. I don't know what language they spoke at their home in Texas
     
  3. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    Do you really feel that what language your family speaks at home and the fact that you're a first generation American will hinder you from doing well in the Navy? I don't know why what language you speak or whether you're a first generation American or a 5th generation American would have an impact on what you accomplish in the military.
     
  4. ESLGuy

    ESLGuy Member

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    Well, I was going off statistics and history. Hopefully it won't. It shouldn't, but most Admirals tend to not be first gen. In theory, it shouldn't change anything, but the statistics... They don't seem to back that up? Well, we can only do our best, right?
     
  5. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    I think it's more of just a coincidence that more non first generations become Admirals more than first generations because of the ratio...way more non first generation Americans in the Navy, but that doesn't mean you can't be one. :thumb:

    I thought of an example...sort of...not of an officer in the Navy, but an enlisted Marine. Sgt. Michael Strank, one of the men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima. He wasn't even first generation, he was actually born in Czecho-Slovakia, immigrated to America, and enlisted in the Marines before WWII even started. He was involved in Battle of Bougainville and Iwo Jima, and was considered a real leader by his men, he was highly respected. Of course, the flag raising photograph was what really made him famous and remembered by civilians (he had already been KIA by the time the photo became famous though), but his fellow Marines respected and admired him before that. He was said to have been a "Marine's Marine", one of those guys who put others before himself and tried to get his men home safely.

    Sorry for the long winded mini bio, but I thought you might like that even though he wasn't some high ranking officer. :thumb:
     
  6. Jason922

    Jason922 Future USNA Candidate '20

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    Exactly. The percentage of white/caucasian people in the Navy are dominant, and thats why most fleet admirals/admirals are white. It can differ individually.
     
  7. esu8

    esu8 Member

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    1st Generation

    Secretary Leon Panetta is a first generation American. Mom and dad i believe to have been Italian. Again I don't know what language they spoke at home. Army but we won't hold it against him. I don't know what rank he rose to while in the Army.
     
  8. ESLGuy

    ESLGuy Member

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    I like the story about the Marine the most. I like stories like that, even when the hero isn't an admiral, etc.
     
  9. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    I think rather than concentrating on the past you need to consider that our society is in a state of transition and the Armed Forces also are in transition - especially in the last few years. There are certain to be growing pains along the way, and many of the old timers are skeptical about some of the changes and their long-term viability, BUT things are changing! Your future is going to be much different from what was the norm when I served my ten years, but you will find that your performance will be more of a determinant than your being a first generation American. Candidly, and I hate to open this potential can of worms, the fact that the services are tracking first generation Americans shows a focus upon that demographic that wasn't there until fairly recently.
    If you truly are interested in becoming a midshipman and officer in the Naval Services, focus upon becoming the best candidate you can be - it will get you farther in the long run. Best wishes to you!
     
  10. SR-71

    SR-71 Member

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    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  11. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    I'm a first generation American. Spoke Chinese at home. Doesn't really affect me here, other than my language validation.

    I won't say there's a significant population of first generation mids here, but don't feel like you'll be at a disadvantage or won't be able to mesh with the group or something. There's international mids and foreign exchange cadets too. We're all good people here.

    Making Admiral isn't easy. I'd say it's less a function of ethnic background and more a matter of very few people making it in the first place. First generation Americans that decide to join the military are few in number to begin with.
     
  12. esu8

    esu8 Member

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    Home Run

    SR-71 I think you hit this one out of the ball park. American exceptionalism.:thumb: Great job! I hope this helps Matas.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  13. mulan50

    mulan50 Member

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    Matas - I am not understanding where you are coming from. You were born in USA, right?You were educated here, obviously speaking English language in school right? So why would you think unless I am misunderstanding that you might get minority status? Lots of people are 1st generation so why would you feel not as an American because your parents don't speak English.? Makes no sense, you were born here, lived as a citizen since birth, you are American.
     
  14. Gaia_CKJ

    Gaia_CKJ Member

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    Just to name a few of the recent admirals:

    Admiral Eleanor Valentin - Commander of the Navy’s Medicine Support Command, the first female to hold the position.

    Rear Admiral Victorino Mercado - graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in May 1983 with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics/Computer Science. He often visits USNA and my daughter met him last year.

    Rear Admiral Eleanor Mariano - the first woman to be the director of the White House Medical Unit. She served as a physician to former President George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

    Rear Admiral Raquel Cruz Bono and her brother Rear Admiral Anatolio B. “AB” Cruz III - brother and sister team made history in the United States Navy, when they became the first and only siblings of Filipino descent to hold flag-officer ranks simultaneously.

    These are just some of them and there are many more. I believe it's not about race, but it's what the military currently needs and what you have to offer. It's true that there might be some people that will play the "race game", but this is true everywhere you go. There will always be some people that will use that as an excuse and it's up to the individual to rise to the top.
     
  15. GoSox

    GoSox Member

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    You seem a little bit focused on this "first generation" American question (to be fair, you suggest as much in your first post). As I recall, you're a 10th grader and you are trying to pull up your math grade after a rocky semester.

    It's good to aim high, but remember that a journey of 10,000 miles starts with one step, or [plug in about 100 additional cliches to that effect]. Work on your math, keep your overall grades up, and practice for SATs and/or ACTs a lot (this summer is not too early to start), because you'll need to get into to USNA or a NROTC program before you can worry about making admiral.
     
  16. ESLGuy

    ESLGuy Member

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    Thanks for all the replies, they were definitely interesting.

    Also, GoSox, my friend that was accepted to NAPS last year got a 31 on the ACT. He took regular Geometry sophomore year and got "a high A." I took honors for 1 semester, now I'm taking regular Geometry. I have the same teacher he had and I have a 100%. If I do better in that class than him, and study just as hard for the ACT I should do even better, haha. I'll look into practicing for the ACT/SAT as a sophomore.
     
  17. GoSox

    GoSox Member

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    Great -- excellent attitude, and that 100% average sounds promising. One bad grade one semester shouldn't hold you back if you keep working hard. Good luck on your quest!
     
  18. AbigailPR2017

    AbigailPR2017 Member

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    I don't know what ethnicity you claim, but I'm from Puerto Rico and I can assure you that the reason why the 1st gens that are ESL (english as a second language) don't get accepted are because of language barriers. They usually have low SAT/ACT english/reading scores and that is what holds them back; however, judging from your posts it seems like you are fluent in english [or using an AWESOME translator :)]. The academies look for diversity in their candidates, so you definitely have that going for you, plus you're bilingual, which is also a plus!

    So no worries, just work hard and keep up the great work :)
     
  19. ESLGuy

    ESLGuy Member

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    Well, I do know English as a second language, but I never thought it was like that for most first generation Americans? That's all interesting to know, thanks agin.
     

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