How to prepare for ROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by cgchris99, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. cgchris99

    cgchris99 Member

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    My son got the dreaded QNV so he decided to accept his AFROTC scholarship.

    Can anyone provide us with the physical requirements are for AFROTC?
    From what I've read, he needs to be able to max all the physical tests.

    What other things could he be studying over the summer to help him prepare for the fall?

    Should he contact the detachment now?

    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I am assuming that you will be joining the AFA reapplying club.

    The PFA/PFT is different than the AFA CFA.

    Spend the summer doing the CFA in their precise order, and in all types of weather and different hours. In other words do it when it is 95 degrees at 6 pm. do it at 6 am (ROTC hours). If he does that he will ace the PFA. No waivering here...if there is 2 minutes rest between push ups and sit ups after the run, you do the 2 minutes. I don't recall the order, but you get my drift. Also no short cuts on the push-ups or sit ups, ROTC will not count a sit up if it is not to the reg.

    There is nothing to study.

    Yes, contact the det ASAP.

    The fact is there is a AFROTC nom too. If you don't talk to them, but your child comes to them in mid-Sept and it is due 1st October, the Commander is not going to be thrilled.

    By approaching the commander now, they will be able to watch them and have a stronger packet for the ROTC nom.

    Remember some dets, like our DS's could have 50 cadets. They show up the last week of August, and it is highly unlikely that 3 weeks later they can put a face with a name for the new cadets.

    CoC's do not harbinger any resentment if the cadet opts to apply for the AFA. They try to do everything in their power to mentor them.

    If you go down the path that telling the det this is your goal, you will only do detriment to yourself. It is a fallacy that CoC's don't support cadets who want to try the AFA route.

    I have stated before our DS opted ROTC over the AFA and his CoC gave their word they would support him if he decided that he chose the wrong path. We met/told the CoC Feb. He kept his word. Our DS elected to stay. He is a C300 (jr) and in the past 3 yrs they have had 3 cadets out of 3 get that support.

    Trust them.

    No officer likes to be blind sided if they have to write a rec short notice. Not contacting them now = blind siding in the fall.
     
  3. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    Just as Pima said, make sure you work on form. It's always bad when folks show up and did 2 million pushups on their PFT with PE Coach for their scholarship and when they take their PFT to activate the scholarship, end up knocking out about 30 or 40, because they came face to face with a standard. ROTC Cadre will uphold that standard. It happens.

    If you get bored over the summer you could look over AF rank structure and basic customs and courtesies, but I wouldn't suggest wasting a summer away with all of that.
     
  4. Mattsmom2015

    Mattsmom2015 Member

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    Pima, cg and I are Matt's parents. At this point we do not know if he will be reapplying to the AFA. We are looking for information strictly concerning the AFROTC now. I pretty much expect that DS will throw himself into his studies and the ROTC and not give the Academy another thought. If you remember from a PM I sent you a couple of weeks back he is very strong academically. For him to "give up" a year of school does not seem like something he would do. I assume he would rather keep on track and graduate with the class of 2015 just like he should whether it be from the USAFA or MSOE.

    So that said, where can we find information on what he should be planning for over the summer. Any books to read or websites to go to?

    We really do appreciate all of the information gathered from this forum!:smile:
     
  5. gojack

    gojack ....

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    We just got back from a day long visit at my sons ROTC.
    I was asking the same question...
    Their only advice was;
    1) Stay out of trouble (Stressed emphatically)
    2) Get in the best shape of his life
    3) *Enjoy his last summer of freedom
    4) Show up for fall classes fit, healthy, rested - with a positive attitude

    *If completely bored, pick up one of the officer handbooks and read it over.

    AF Physical Fitness Test Here
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2011
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    There is no book that I could rec.

    I would say this, the one thing I think is great regarding our DS's det is they have a mentor program.

    POCs (C300) are assigned C100 cadets. They are with them (100's) until they become a 300, at that point the 300 is graduating.

    Good ones really care. Believe it or not the good ones lurk on here.

    It is important to understand the promotion system. They have a vested interest in the success of younger cadets.

    As others have stated for C100 being in shape is a big issue. Otherwise there really isn't anything else you can do.

    Sorry, there is one more thing....don't be an arse! Don't walk in believing that you were in JROTC or CAP makes you the be all. Don't walk in and ask if PT is optional.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 28, 2011
  7. gojack

    gojack ....

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    I think it was intended as meaningless, harmless busywork.
    Something to keep a restless teenager occupied and out of trouble -
    which was their primary concern.
     
  8. Mattsmom2015

    Mattsmom2015 Member

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    Actually our primary concern is to have him be as prepared as he possibly can when he gets to ROTC this fall. He is not a restless teenager that needs to be kept out of trouble, actually quite the opposite.
     

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