Medical Disenrollment

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by jwestman1, Oct 6, 2014.

  1. jwestman1

    jwestman1 Member

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    Alright, so I know there probably won't be definite answers but I'm just coming here for some advice/ideas before I deal with this this week in real life. I am a 4 year AROTC scholarship cadet, and I've loved the program. I've been happy with my decision and looking forward to my future plans of being an officer. I'm a team leader, good grades, and 300+ apft. I passed my dodmerb, and was honest on every part. Now over the past semester and the beginning of this one, I've been having depression/anxiety issues (almost lead me to dropping the program last spring and lead to a bad gpa and an extremely rough semester). The college counselor suggests I make an appointment to look into medication. I know if I do this I will be medically disqualified. I don't want that to happen at all, but I also know that I need to make my health a priority. If I was medically disenrolled, what would my possible consequences look like? Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Jcc123

    Jcc123 Member

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    Don't take this as gospel, but medical disenrollment typically does not involve repayment of scholarship funds.
     
  3. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    Before you move forward with medication, have you spoken with your cadre, parents, leaders in religious or community organizations you are a part of, or any other counselors?

    Taking medication will have serious effects on your future as far as your plans in the military go, it would be wise to discuss this with others who may be able to offer better advice than us, since we have no clue on your exact circumstances, and could possibly help you with your problems more than medicine. Especially since your college counselor is most likely not familiar with what can medically DQ you, your cadre may be able to provide alternative options that keep you qualified and on track to commission.

    When it comes to you leaving ROTC, that should be discussed with your cadre, not us. We can only speculate on your situation, they will be the ones with the best knowledge and guidance.
     
  4. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    The college counselor is most likely not an MD. I don't believe that simply seeking a private medical evaluation will make you disqualified. Perhaps medication isn't required? It may be something else entirely. I disagree with informing ANYONE in the military until AFTER you see a doc. Once you know what you're actually dealing with by all means consult those whose opinions you value. Good Luck!
     
  5. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    My advice about talking with cadre is not about informing them of the possibility of leaving the program. It's about meeting with more than one source (in this case a school counselor) to get advice and guidance from people this person may trust. Some people trust their leadership, others feel comfortable talking with members of the clergy, and others may trust their city league basketball coach. Whoever it is, in this case I would seek advice from more than just a school counselor on an issue that may alter an entire career path. It's not abnormal for soldiers to bring their issues to their leadership for advice or guidance....that's part of their job. Some people are able to talk out their issues and find ways to deal with them without ever having to consult with the medical side.

    In addition to that, when it comes to people seeking counseling, you'd probably be surprised how many of the cadre have probably met with a counselor at some point in time for their own needs.
     
  6. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    Dealing with Anxiety/Stress and also Depression is increasingly a problem in our fast paced, crowded and competitive society (compared to fifty years ago, and compared to most agrarian lifestyles).

    Now, let's ask how people in general deal with it. Among the options:

    - avoid situations that give rise to anxiety/stress
    - avoid situations that lead to feelings of depression and engage in activities that uplift your spirit.
    - self medicate with marijuana or other federal non-legal drugs
    - self medicate with alcohol... this is legal assuming you're 21, and is a big one now and over the past decades. You know the familiar movie scene..., you get on a plane, you're anxious, and you down a couple of drinks and everything's fine. Or you're nervous is a social situation and drink to lose that anxiety.
    - Engage in spiritual anxiety-reducing and depression-reducing disciplines like prayer, meditation
    - Get into psychological therapy, church counseling, and/or get into a peer support group without the use of medication

    Bottom line is that ingesting the medications a psychiatrist or doctor (psychologist and LCSW's are not allowed to prescribe medication) would prescribe is but one of many strategies people use to deal with anxiety and stress. And should probably be a step taken if other steps prove to be unsuccessful.

    Oh, and yeah, a prescription for any psychopharmacologic medication leads to an AROTC medical separation from the program.

    Take your time and step carefully before you do something that removes the Army as a career choice (and probably FBI, CIA, and other jobs that require security clearances.

    P.S. It isn't the appointment with a psychiatrist that leads to disenrollment... is the the diagnosis the Psychiatrist determines... whether you follow medical advice to take the recommended medication isn't relevant. It is the diagnosis itself, which is, per your AROTC Scholarship Cadet Contract, a "change in medical condition" that you are obligated to report to cadre.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2014

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