Medicial Evaluation Question

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Adm22064, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. Adm22064

    Adm22064 New Member

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    Hello,

    This is my first post so hopefully the thread is in the right place. I will be transferring to Virginia Tech as a junior and will be joining ROTC. I have a few question about the DoDMERB exam that I will have to go through.

    I loss the tip of my non-dominant thumb at the finger nail when I was young, but still have full function/feel and I am able to pick up a sewing pin/pencil/etc. More specifically, I still have majority of my distal phalanx and I did not lose up to the interphalangeal joint. So it functions just like my other thumb. If I'm joining the Army, does DoDMERB follow the Army's Standards of Medical Fitness (40-501)? If so, I have done a little research and found the following in the standards. I bolded the parts that I thought were most important. Since I did not lose up to or greater than the inter. joint and I am able to pass the other tests, I shouldn't be referred to an MEB. That being said, do you guys think I will be DQ'd? Should I get documentation of my thumb from a doctor before the DodMERB exam so it might expedite the process (I've heard that getting a waiver may take many months, how would this affect my chances of ROTC?). I'd like to get other people's opinion on this matter. Thanks!

    (5) Fingers and thumb (726.4): Inability to clench fist, pick up a pin, grasp an object, or touch tips of at least three
    fingers with thumb.

    b. Hand and fingers.
    (1) Current absence of the distal phalanx of either thumb (885) does not meet the standard

    The causes for referral to an MEB are as follows (see also para 3–14):

    a. Amputation.
    (1) For purposes of this regulation, upper extremity amputation is defined as the loss of part or parts of an upper
    extremity equal to or greater than--
    (a) A thumb proximal to the interphalangeal joint
     
  2. Adm22064

    Adm22064 New Member

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    By joining the Army, I meant Army ROTC.
     
  3. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Bravo for researching the recondite Army fitness standards.

    Based on what you have said, it would not seem that your condition should trigger a DQ. However, to protect yourself from what is often a cursory examination, you may want to print off and highlight that portion of the standards, bring it to the exam, and politely suggest that your thumb be tested. Explain that you want to demonstrate that your thumb does in fact meet the standards. It's possible the doctor will not have run across this since medical school.
     

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