Mistake accepting appointment?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by HiMyNameisNick, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. HiMyNameisNick

    HiMyNameisNick Member

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    I am a current college freshman. Applied to USNA for 2nd time and got in. I was accepted because I am a college programmer in nrotc (meaning I will not commission unless I pick up a scholarship)

    I accepted USNA's appointment, because it seemed unlikely I would get NROTC scholarship. 1 month later, I get NROTC scholarship. I am talking to many Navy and USMC officers and they all agree I would be better off doing NROTC (marine option).

    Am I locked into UNSA because I signed the acceptance of the appointment? I know it's possible to still not go to USNA, but does signing that letter disqualify me from getting the NROTC scholarship?

    I emailed USNA, just looking to see if anyone else has been through this before.

    Also, I have not yet decided if I will do USNA or NROTC, I just want to know if it is possible to do so. I feel like there is going to be an issue since I already signed USNA paperwork.
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    You can always back out of a USNA appointment. They can't force you to show up. However, in fairness to all, you should make your final decision by May 1 so that slot you don't select (either ROTC or USNA) can be provided to others.

    No one here can tell you what is the right choice for you. Both are great options. If you're happy with your civilian school and NROTC, then you might be best off staying where you are. If you will always wonder, always wish you'd gone to USNA or want the immersed military lifestyle . . . well, as I said, it's your decision. And a great choice you have!:smile:
     
  3. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

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    Nick, First of all, congratulations! You have some great choices!

    pros for ROTC:
    - You will commission a year sooner than if you now go to USNA
    - If you want USMC and your scholarship is Marine option, going this route definitely gets you the service selection you want. At USNA, as you probably know from this board, most Mids get their first choice, but going USMC would not be guaranteed.
    - If you like the typical college lifestyle, go ROTC

    pros for USNA:
    - Educational opportunities are awfully hard to beat. Since you will already have done one year of college, chances are good that during Firstie year you could either start a Master's degree or do research in your major
    - Academic support system is tremendous
    - Great opportunity to interact with many officers and senior enlisted personnel
    - Not sure what summer training is available through your ROTC unit, but many opportunities are available through USNA
     
  4. rkrosnar

    rkrosnar Member

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    Nick,

    First, congratulations. You have made an excellent choice, to accept the appointment. While, you you may like the college experience. There is nothing like the academies. There are things you think you can't do and then do them. You will do more in a week, than a regular college student does more in a month. Plus great education. But either you choose, you can't lose.

    Thank you for serving the greatest country in the world the United States of America.

    God Bless and God Speed,

    RGK
     
  5. MIDNDAD

    MIDNDAD Member

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    DD is Marine. Couple of reasons to select the Academy Option:

    1. Academy grads do not go to OCS while NROTC Marine Officer candidates do. The wash out rate at OCS is very high. Your entire military career could come to a halt at OCS. Both OCS and USNA grads go through TBS.

    2. The Maine Corps is downsizing, which is public knowledge. In 2011 & 2012 the maximum number of Midshipman were selected for the Marine Corps option. ( It's approximately 270 ). If that trend holds true for 2013 it means the Marines are giving a preference to USNA grads and scaling back the numbers from the NROTC side. I have not seen or heard anything offical on this but in times of cutbacks the numbers are interesting.

    3. USNA has started a Cyber Warfare program in 2012. If you are a computer geek that should have your interest.


    You have options in front of you and they are all good. Choose what you believe is best for you and best of luck with your future.
     
  6. Contrails

    Contrails Member

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    Nick, would you mind sharing what the officers are saying regarding NROTC being a better option than USNA? I've been rejected this year and may be in your shoes the same time next year.
     
  7. HiMyNameisNick

    HiMyNameisNick Member

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    staying NROTC:
    -commission in 3 years instead of 4
    -less hazing/bull **** to distract me from my schoolwork
    -more specific USMC training
    -guaranteed marine corps
    -learn how to deal with real world problems (helps relate to for enlisted better)
    -after 5 years of service, were you got your undergrad degree will not matter
    -less student cynicism
    -more opportunities for research and internships
    -more 1 on1 interaction with officers and enlisted

    I have determined the education, military experience, and price to be equal for either choice, so basically the best thing about the academy seems like the brand name. Th prestige of the academy is pretty cool, but in reality that doesn't actually help too much, especially in the marine corps.
     
  8. usnabgo08

    usnabgo08 USNA 2008/BGO

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    Disclaimer: I am not trying to convince/endorse NROTC over USNA (or vice versa), but rather amplify some of the assumptions/preceptions/myths.

    "In his narrative, The World of Epictetus, on why he succeeded in enduring the horrors of prison camp, Admiral Stockdale gives considerable credit to the teachings of the Stoic philosopher Epictetus, but also to his plebe year at Annapolis, which he says helped pull him through those 8 years in a prison camp." (http://www.louispojman.com/Moral_Saints_Heros.pdf)

    I think this is enough said, there is value to having a plebe year at USNA, even as it has been watered down and given that not everyone will find themselves as a POW.

    I wouldn't necessarily say this is true. Semper Fi Society at USNA was pretty active when I was there and the Marines on the Yard do make training opportunities available to the Brigade. I heard of a recent weekend FEX to MCB Quantico. I am pretty sure Hurricane 12 could amplify the types of USMC activities available to MIDN.

    I believe the acceptance rate for USMC billets is normally pretty high (i.e. those who request and subsequently selected for first choice). As stated before in previous posts, if you put forth the effort/motivation and can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that you have a vested interest to be a Marine, you will be selected. In extenuating circumstances, some of those selected for USMC might be drafted into another service selection, but I'd argue an overwhelming amount of MIDN who want to be Marines will become Marines.

    Real world problems -- as in paying bills or dealing with someone involved in an alcohol related incident or family issue? If talking about the earlier, that is true MIDN don't have to have manage a budget (for the most part), however, for the later parts, MIDN are people and do have issues similar to those of Enlisted and Officers (i.e. from alcohol incidents to death of family members). They must deal with these problems within their chain of command and one-on-one with the individual, as well.

    This is very true (though, I don't think anyone can quanity the number of years), but past performance (as an officer, not MIDN) is an indicator on future performance (statutory boards for promotion are based off of fitness/performance reports)

    Likely to be true!

    I'm not sure what NROTC offers but there are a number of robust research and internship programs (as well as graduate level programs) at USNA. Every summer many MIDN participate in these programs.

    The Navy SEL program, while I was a MIDN, was lacking interaction with the Brigade. HOWEVER, the Marine Officers and Enlisted always made themselves available, very approachable, were extremely dedicated to "bringing up" MIDN that wanted to be Marines -- the only requirement was that you showed an interest. You could find Marine GySgts out and about (especially when PT was involved) within their companies and battalions. Unless things have changed, the Marines clearly (IMHO) embarassed the Chief Petty Officer Mess when it came to interaction with MIDN.
     
  9. mdrob214

    mdrob214 Member

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    ^^^^
    I am NOT an academy alum from any of the services and am not Navy (USAF ROTC grad, still wondering why DD opted for USNA ??, but her choice).

    With regards to the any "advice" given regarding perception about value be careful. Look only at the facts. The 3 instead of 4 years is true. All of the other items in that list are merely perceptions of the person giving the advice.

    - Guarantee? Really? They said that? My freshman year I was guaranteed a pilot/nav spot. Guess what. The needs of the AF changed and the reduced how many they awarded. I wasn't top 25% so I didn't get it. NOTHING is guaranteed.

    - Regarding the real world problems, opportunities, and cynicism. All of that purely depends on the person. I know/knew plenty of cynical cadets and ROTC midshipmen. The SAs don't have a lock on that. And you only get opportunities if YOU make them, ROTC or otherwise.

    Bottomline - if you WANT it, then all the BS/Hazing/whatever is worth it. That is YOUR decision. All ROTC and USNA offer is two distinct paths to becoming an officer. Neither is any better or worse than the other except to the person who has to make the choice. Focus on facts from other people and what you want for the perceptions.
     
  10. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    For most people, the choice comes down to this:

    Do you want a mostly civilian college experience with some military thrown in or do you want an almost 100% military experience?

    Both will make you a fine officer (TBS will take care of that for the USMC:biggrin:).

    But the way you spend your four years will differ significantly. As others have said, there's not a "right" or "wrong" way, nor a better/worse one. It depends on what YOU want.

    One last point FWIW . . . I've known several mids who started USNA with one or even two years of civilian college under their belts. They have universally said that prior college experience helped them at USNA from an academic and maturity standpoint and definitely was not a "waste."
     

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