NAPS

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by stretch95, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. stretch95

    stretch95 Member

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    I am wondering if there are any members that have been offered appointment to the Naval Academy Prep School Class of 2013? Also, are there any NAPSters that could give me some advice because I was offered appointment to NAPS
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    A current NAPSter on this site has said he/she will answer questions. You might want to search on this forum and the Prep School forum (can't recall where he posted) to get the contact info.
     
  3. CaptainBlack

    CaptainBlack Member

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    I was accepted NAPS
     
  4. pilot2b

    pilot2b Candidate Appointee

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    I'm a current NAPSter. Feel free to pm me anytime.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    If the questions about NAPS would be of general interest, you may want to consider posting them here so that others can get the benefit of the info.
     
  6. SAMom

    SAMom Member

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    My Son was accepted to NAPS and my daughter has been to NAPS so ask away..
     
  7. stretch95

    stretch95 Member

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    Thanks to all of you who have helped and I wish the NAPS appointees the best of luck. I have been doing a lot of thinking and I've decided that NAPS and USNA (the officer route) is not what I really want to do. I want to be a Navy SEAL and just that. I know that officers do not remain what they call "operational" long in the SEAL teams and I want to be an enlisted man. I will just take a year off after I graduate high school to train and then enlist when I turn 18.
     
  8. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

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    With all due respect, watching the incredible odds of this one, imho,you're nuts. And you're entitled to be "nuts." Yours is your life to mess up. Throwing away a once-in-a-lifetime gift of a freebie ticket to NAPS may haunt you for the rest of your days. This one is prime for regret. Don't make this decision frivolously or in the fog of youth. Things change ... especially for SEAL wannabes. We've all made dumb mistakes, and that's the reason that the famous line in Forrest Gump became so "famous." It struck a ton of nerves when Gump waxed, "Stupid is as stupid does."

    My counsel is "don't."

    You asked for none, and you'll get no applause from me. :thumbdown: Be thankful I'm not your old man. :eek:
     
  9. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I can only say that you should give this some thought.

    I take it you've read "No Easy Day." I don't dispute the accuracy of that book -- I'm not in a position to do so.

    However, you don't just enlist and become a SEAL. You enlist and then apply to be a SEAL. And then, if selected, you get through the training. You may be one of those who makes it. However, consider your future if you don't.

    If you do NAPS and then USNA and then want to be a SEAL, you will get a lot of help and prep along the way that will help you be successful. And, along THAT way, you may find that there's something else that calls you, like being a pilot or a ship driver or sub driver or Marine. And you will have the benefit of a terrific college education that will hold you in good stead whatever you choose to do.

    Before you turn down NAPS, I STRONGLY encourage you to talk to a number of folks. There are SEALs at USNA -- ask to speak with one of them. Consider your future if you don't get selected for SEALs as an enlisted. Then what?

    As WP says, you have a TERRIFIC opportunity at your doorstep. My STRONG recommendation is to try NAPS. If, after a year, you still want to be enlisted, you can do so. There is no requirement to attend USNA after NAPS. But you may find that you really want to be an officer -- and a SEAL. Give yourself a chance. It's only one year.
     
  10. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    Agree with usna1985 and (surprisingly) WP.

    NAPS is a great opportunity and there's no follow-on obligation to USNA. You're talking about taking a year off before enlisting anyway. Make NAPS that year. NAPS isn't that bad as far as restrictions go. Work out a ton (you'll be surrounded by motivators, priors, and recruited athletes) and do some soul searching. If you decide the officer path isn't for you, then hey, whatever, you gave it a go.

    Something else to consider is that they may not be hurting for SEALs right now. It's not like they always need a constant steady flow of dudes to had to BUD/S; it depends on the manning requirements of the Navy. Obviously the Navy and the SEAL program are both very different, but there are actually waiting periods to enlist in the Marine Corps for certain MOSs right now (notably 03XX, infantry). There's the possibility that you could walk into the recruiter's office and be told there's a significant wait before you can ship.

    If you're really committed to the SEAL thing, the Naval Academy will hook you up if they decide you're worth it and get selected. Last I heard, no one from my class who graduated and reported to BUD/S had dropped out yet (the overwhelming majority have started training). On average, supposedly Academy guys have something like an 80% success rate at BUD/S.
    The SEALs (or, more accurately, the SEAL) on the yard do everything possible to set those guys up for success when they're selected. I know one guy who, before he reported to BUD/S, was attached to the SEAL officer on the yard. His entire job over the summer was working out and prepping for BUD/S. I was talking to his wife the other day and he apparently describes BUD/S as "not that bad," in part because of the training he got at, and after, USNA.
     
  11. stretch95

    stretch95 Member

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    It's just not for me. I'm not going to rob someone of an opportunity. I know about this whole process. I know guys in the teams & the officer route isn't what i want. I know how much the odds are stacked against me already (nobody needs to tell me that). But I do also know that i'm not one of those wannabes who watched Act of Valor or put a book down & decided he wanted to be a SEAL. I've wanted this since 6th grade & I've been preparing myself mentally &physically.
     
  12. pilot2b

    pilot2b Candidate Appointee

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    Either route you go you're taking a slot that somebody else could have potentially filled. At least take the advice of those above and try and contact a SEAL, preferably one who is an academy grad.
     
  13. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

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    You nailed it Pilot2b. Either way, someone wins. And misses.

    I could be off the mark, but I'm guessing that there is far more here than the eye can read, and a candid insight in the comment ...
    He's persuaded me he's 100% correct in this candid self-assessment. As to his magnanimous motivation, it's rare we see such selfless concern for others.

    In any case, the really good news here is that however it's been reached, his decision might be a good one for all concerned.

    Best wishes in your next steps. Let us know how it works out. :thumb:
     
  14. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    OP, it's your decision.

    Just ask yourself this question . . . "What if I don't become a SEAL?"

    For whatever reason. I know you believe you will but, what if you don't? What's your Plan B?

    Those of us a bit older than you know how important it is always to have a Plan B in life because life tends to throw you curves at the most unexpected times and in the most unexpected ways. It happens. Desire and motiviation carry you a long way but not always over the finish line. So do consider what you will do if you enlist and becoming a SEAL doesn't work out. Lots of great options -- be sure you have one or more in mind.:thumb:
     
  15. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    I am with the OP on this one. While I agree with the other posters that he is throwing a chest of gold coins off the bridge by not taking the offered NAPS/Academy route, he doesn't want it. I agree this decision is raw immaturity and he will regret it in the future but he doesn't want it. He does not want to lead SEAL teams. He does not want to plan operations, he does not want the responsibility of the success of his mission, the responsibility for the safety of his men, the responsibility of the training, the responsibility for the wisdom of the plan, nor the increased pay or the recognition of the teams achievements. He doesn't want the chance to command. So, why send him not-motivated on that path? Give his slot to a young man who does want to be an officer and lead SEALS. He wishes to take orders rather than form them so what's to say? Enlist on your 18th birthday and good luck.
     
  16. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

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    Agreed. In fact it seems we're all in 100% agreement on this one now. NAPS isn't for OP. OP's not for NAPS.

    And it's best this was determined prior to consuming a spot and chance of a lifetime that someone else will be thrilled to have.

    Think of it maybe like a donated kidney to one he'll never know but will be forever grateful.
     
  17. GoSox

    GoSox Member

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    Not sure why people are taking additional parting shots at this kid -- you gave your advice, he didn't take it. He's been honest about his reasons, and I've met some SEALs who followed similar paths -- it may work out for him although, as most of you have correctly noted, the odds are relatively slim. But he'll grow up, may get a shot at his dream, and he might even be able to re-apply and get NAPs down the road from the Fleet if the SEALs doesn't work out.

    Good luck stretch95 -- if you give the Navy your best whatever comes, you can be proud of your choices whether you get Plan A, B, or X, Y, or Z.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  18. stretch95

    stretch95 Member

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    GoSox,

    Thank you very much &you you understand where i am coming from & not taking shots at me. I guess the majority of the people who offered their unimportant comments do not know the difference between a SEAL officer & an enlisted SEAL. Whatever their cases may be, i really do not care

    Spud

    You can chastise me for this, that, & the other but the point is this. I know SEALs who are officers & those who are enlisted men &i they both tell me that if I am serious about this thing & operational if i ever get the chance to become a SEAL, then enlisted is the way to go. I could care less about the responsibility because it is going to be there always whether you are enlisted or not & in regards to "responsibility of success" they are called SEAL [TEAMS] for a reason. They win together & they lose together.Enlisted men hold just as much responsibility of success as officers do.

    Yes i am young & i know some of you senior people think this decision is "immature" but i am the only person who is going to live with this. I've talked to TRULY experienced people regarding this matter & my decision is based on that & what i want. Thank you all
     
  19. Rebel91

    Rebel91 Member

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    Easiest Day?

    Stretch - nothing wrong with YOUR decision, it sounds as though you have thought it through and know your goals. As far as plan B, C...Z, don't sweat it. I have deployed with many SEALs and the guys who are successful in BUDS never thought about a "Plan B" while they were going through training --they were solely focused on reaching their goal of getting the Trident.

    SEALs don't quit, regardless of obstables, so never, ever quit once you get there. Swim, run, and do CrossFit 2x day for the next year (with an occassional day of rest). Discipline yourself to a strict nutritional diet, consider a paleo program. Swim and run again, even if you think you are extremely fit.

    There is absolutely NOTHING wrong about being an enlisted soldier, sailor, airman or Marine. They are the heroes who make our country great. 90% of USNA or NAPS guys will never try and/or could never make it through BUDS, I seriously hope you accomplish your goal and serve our country with honor.
     
  20. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Stretch --

    If you've not already done so, I suggest you contact your local recruiter. He/she can give you all of your options -- including how to go about becoming a SEAL.

    I would note that having a Plan B does NOT mean you expect to fail. In the military, it's not uncommon not to achieve your desired goal for reasons having nothing to do with desire, effort and/or ability -- most often medical.

    By way of example, when I was on AD, our squadron's flight surgeon originally joined the USN to be an F-14 pilot. Halfway through flight school, his eyes deteriorated (in the days before PRK) and his dream of being a pilot was dashed. He still had his service obligation so, b/c he was already an MD, he became a flight surgeon. I don't think he ever "planned" on his Plan B but it became his reality.

    So discuss with your recruiter all of your options, including SEALs. And best of luck to you!
     

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