Naval Sea Cadets?

Discussion in 'Service Academy Parents' started by MMMom, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. MMMom

    MMMom Member

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    DS is a junior, high GPA in all AP/Honors classes, will be a 4 year varsity athlete, 10 year club swim team, 10 year community swim team, high school team captain, officer positions in both NHS and school's largest service organization (1500 members), lifeguard, very good SAT scores, will likely be attending Boy's State this summer, has been to USNA Swim Camp and applying to USNA Summer Seminar and USGCA AIM programs.

    I'm just noticing some info on the boards that mention the Naval Sea Cadets, and upon doing some research find that there is a local unit in our town. Does anyone have any experience with this program or know if it will help his applications for USNA, USCGA and USMMA if he were to pursue it at this point?
     
  2. kpmom2013

    kpmom2013 Member

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    Our DS (NROTC scholarship recipient to TAMU, nominated to USNA, USMA, and USMMA, and appointed to USMMA) was a Sea Cadet since age 10. My DD (junior in high school) is currently Leading Petty Officer of our local Sea Cadet unit and is a Chief Petty Officer select. It is a terrific program with lots of leadership opportunities. I do not think it had a big impact on admission, but I know it made plebe life easier for our DS because he was already well versed with Naval customs and coutesies. It also solidified his desire to serve and gave him something to talk about during the interview processes. Starting as a junior is late, but I'm sure your DS would get something out of the program, especially by attending Recruit Training this summer. However, I would not pursue this activity (or any other) just to have another item for the resume. Feel free to pm me with any specific questions about the program.
     
  3. MMMom

    MMMom Member

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    Thanks so much for the info... it is probably too late for him to start and get much out of it. So wish we had known about it a few years ago, as it sounds like something he would have really enjoyed.
     
  4. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    I agree - joining at this point could be seen as "resume padding" and probably wouldn't add much to his (already impressive) EC list.

    :cool:
     
  5. sprog

    sprog Member

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    It seems as if his EC and leadership credentials are already very strong.

    I wouldn't worry too much about not doing Sea Cadets (the same could be said of JROTC). USNA or USCGA will teach him how to be in the military. If you have done it for several years, it's a good EC, but there is no need to add it just to try and impress the SAs. In the end, a single year of Sea Cadets probably won't mean a whole lot (especially if there is no leadership position obtained in that organization). Take the advice for what it's worth. If he really wants to do it, however, there is no reason not to.

    If it were me, I'd just try to enjoy what remaining time I had as a civilian high school kid. The resume is already looking pretty good, and he will have plenty of time to be in a military environment once he hits the SA.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
  6. MMMom

    MMMom Member

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    Thanks again for the feedback... I think his resume is shaping up nicely, but reading on here about so many who are 3q'd with noms who do NOT get appointments makes you wonder what that magic combination is to get an appointment. I know there are thousands of other kids about there who are just as strong, and while I know he could get into any number of great schools with his credentials, he has his heart set on USNA or USCGA. We are just trying to help him focus on the things he CAN control and not worry about the things he can't...
     
  7. sprog

    sprog Member

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    There is no magic formula.

    I'm sure your son is a strong contender, but in the end, admission to one of the SAs is a tough competition. There may be a formula for what weight is given to class rank/standardized tests, etc.; however, there are a hell of a lot of subjective factors that play into the mix. You've heard/read it all before, no doubt.

    There is all sorts of debate on here as to what the "actual" acceptance rates are at these places (i.e. do you include all who opened a file, all who are 3Q with nom? etc.). Suffice it to say, no matter how you add up the numbers, there are more kids who do not get in than who do. It's cliched to say, but the only thing you can control is your own record. Looks like you are fully aware of that. Good grades, good test scores, leadership, and sports/ECs are the way to do that. From what I've read above, your son is in as strong a shape as any to compete.

    We all had our hearts set on certain schools when going through the admissions process. It doesn't always work out the way we want it to. A good plan B is essential. Unfortunately, for kids who have been successful in high school, the college admissions process can be one of the first exposures to a real disappointment that they ever have. Being told "no" sucks, and there is no way around it.

    I have done college fairs as an alumni representative for VMI. VMI was not my first choice school as a high school senior, although it grew to be the place I belonged. When I was applying in the mid '90s, I did not get into USMA despite having what I thought was a strong record. It absolutely pissed me off. I am upfront about this when I counsel kids about VMI, and I always tell them that if they want to be active duty officers, especially if they want a career in the services, the best bet to to consider an SA as a first choice. Do the best you can to make your record strong and never self-eliminate from consideration. (the last bit is just general advice, as I'm sure it doesn't apply to the OP).

    More than you asked for, I'm sure. Nothing you haven't heard already, I'm sure. Nonetheless, all that is important is that your son knows he did the best he could and that no magic bullet is going to swing him into the admit pile.

    He sounds like a strong candidate, and I'm hopeful he gets an appointment.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
  8. MMMom

    MMMom Member

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    Awesome advice Sprog... he IS lucky that he has a school counselor who is married to a West Point grad and who has already helped several kids gain successful appointments to the SA's. Really, for a 17 year old kid coming from a non-SA family, that is like GOLD. She is helping him to stay on track and is so encouraging and supportive. They are driving the boat, and I'm just along for the ride!
     

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